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Auteur Rouyer, T.; Bonhommeau, S.; Giordano, N.; Giordano, F.; Ellul, S.; Ellul, G.; Deguara, S.; Wendling, B.; Bernard, S.; Kerzerho, V. doi  openurl
  Titre Tagging Atlantic bluefin tuna from a Mediterranean spawning ground using a purse seiner Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Fish Res.  
  Volume 226 Numéro Pages 105522  
  Mots-Clés Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean stock; Electronic tagging; Large Atlantic bluefin tuna; migration; Migrations; movements; population-structure; Purse seine; thermal biology; thunnus-thynnus  
  Résumé Atlantic bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus, is as an emblematic and commercially valuable large pelagic species. In the past ten years, the purse seine fishery in the Mediterranean represents more than 50 % of the catch. Nowadays, purse seines target large fish and operate during the spawning season in the spawning grounds. Electronic tagging has shed a considerable amount of light on the ecology and behaviour of bluefin tuna over the past twenty years. However, such technique has rarely been applied on large bluefin tunas caught by the Mediterranean purse seine fishery despite its major importance. The logistical constraints related to this specific fishery, combined with the timing of migration of the fish and the requirements related to the handling of big fish have made adequate tagging from purse seines complex. Here we detail such an operation, designed to bridge the knowledge gap on the migratory behaviour of tunas targeted by the purse seine fishery. Three large bluefin tunas from the same school were tagged during the fishing operation of a French purse seine, resulting in a different migration pattern than previous deployments. The fish were tagged onboard in less than 2 min and efficiently, avoiding any subsequent mortality. These results contrast with those from tagging operations carried out in the Northwest Mediterranean, which underlies the importance of tagging operations from purse seines to obtain unbiased description of the movements of the eastern Atlantic bluefin tuna stock in the context of its management.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000525305200010 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2771  
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Auteur Travassos Tolotti, M.; Forget, F.; Capello, M.; Filmalter, J.D.; Hutchinson, M.; Itano, D.; Holland, K.; Dagorn, L. doi  openurl
  Titre Association dynamics of tuna and purse seine bycatch species with drifting fish aggregating devices (FADs) in the tropical eastern Atlantic Ocean Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Fish Res.  
  Volume 226 Numéro Pages 105521  
  Mots-Clés Acoustic telemetry; behavior; Behavior; carcharhinus-falciformis; floating objects; Floating objects; obesus; pacific-ocean; patterns; Pelagic fish; Residence time; silky sharks; skipjack katsuwonus-pelamis; Tropical tuna; vertical movements; yellowfin thunnus-albacares  
  Résumé Several pelagic fish species are known to regularly associate with floating objects in the open ocean, including commercially valuable species. The tuna purse seine industry takes advantage of this associative behavior and has been increasingly deploying free-drifting man-made floating objects, also known as fish aggregating devices (FADs). Using passive acoustic telemetry, this study describes the associative dynamics of the main targeted tropical tuna species (Thunnus albacores, T. obelus and Katsuwonus pelamis), as well as three major bycatch species, silky shark (Carcharhinus falciformis), rainbow runner (Elagatis bipinmdata) and oceanic triggerfish (Canthidermis maculata). Short-term excursions away from the FADs were frequently performed by all tuna species as well by silky sharks. These excursions were characterized by a marked diel pattern, mainly occurring during nighttime. Rainbow runners and oceanic triggerfish were much more present at the FADs and rarely performed excursions. Average continuous residence times (CRTs) ranged from 6 days, for silky shark, up to 25 days for bigeye tuna. Similar to silky shark, average CRTs for skipjack tuna and oceanic triggerfish were less than 10 days. For yellowfin tuna and rainbow runner, CRTs averaged 19 and 16 days, respectively. Bigeye and yellowfin tuna remained associated to a single drifting FAD for a record of 55 days and 607 km traveled.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000525305200009 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2772  
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Auteur Heerah, K.; Cox, S.L.; Blevin, P.; Guinet, C.; Charrassin, J.-B. doi  openurl
  Titre Validation of Dive Foraging Indices Using Archived and Transmitted Acceleration Data: The Case of the Weddell Seal Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Frontiers In Ecology And Evolution  
  Volume 7 Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés diving behavior; foraging; biologging; accelerometers; movement ecology; satellite relayed data logger; sea-ice  
  Résumé Dive data collected from archival and satellite tags can provide valuable information on foraging activity via the characterization of movement patterns (e.g., wiggles, hunting time). However, a lack of validation limits interpretation of what these metrics truly represent in terms of behavior and how predators interact with prey. Head-mounted accelerometers have proven to be effective for detecting prey catch attempt (PrCA) behaviors, and thus can provide a more direct measure of foraging activity. However, device retrieval is typically required to access the high-resolution data they record, restricting use to animals returning to predictable locations. In this study, we present and validate data obtained from newly developed satellite-relay data tags, capable of remotely transmitting summaries of tri-axial accelerometer measurements. We then use these summaries to assess foraging metrics generated from dive data only. Tags were deployed on four female Weddell seals in November 2014 at Dumont d'Urville, and successfully acquired data over similar to 2 months. Retrieved archival data for one individual, and transmitted data for four individuals were used to (1) compare and validate abstracted accelerometer transmissions against outputs from established processing procedures, and (2) assess the validity of previously developed dive foraging indices, calculated solely from time-depth measurements. We found transmitted estimates of PrCA behaviors were generally comparable to those obtained from archival processing, although a small but consistent over-estimation was noted. Following this, dive foraging segments were identified either from (1) sinuosity in the trajectories of high-resolution depth archives, or (2) vertical speeds between low resolution transmissions of key depth inflection points along a dive profile. In both cases, more than 93% of the estimated PrCA behaviors (from either abstracted transmissions or archival processing) fell into inferred dive foraging segments (i.e., “hunting” segments), suggesting the two methods provide a reliable indicator of foraging effort. The validation of transmitted acceleration data and foraging indices derived fromtime-depth recordings for Weddell seals offers new avenues for the study of foraging activity and dive energetics. This is especially pertinent for species from which tag retrieval is challenging, but also for the post-processing of the numerous low-resolution dive datasets already available.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2296-701x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2590  
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Auteur Cruaud, P.; Decker, C.; Olu, K.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Papot, C.; Le Baut, J.; Vigneron, A.; Khripounoff, A.; Gayet, N.; Cathalot, C.; Caprais, J.-C.; Pignet, P.; Godfroy, A.; Cambon-Bonavita, M.-A. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecophysiological differences between vesicomyid species and metabolic capabilities of their symbionts influence distribution patterns of the deep-sea clams Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Evol. Persp.  
  Volume 40 Numéro 3 Pages e12541  
  Mots-Clés calyptogena-magnifica; chemoautotrophic bacteria; cold seeps; community structure; deep-sea ecosystems; evolutionary relationships; guaymas basin; Guaymas Basin; gulf-of-california; hydrothermal vent clam; macrofaunal communities; marine ecology; pliocardinae bivalve; sulfide-rich sediments; sulfur storage; vesicomyid movements  
  Résumé This study provides an analysis of vesicomyid bivalve-symbiont community distribution across cold seep and hydrothermal vent areas in the Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California, Mexico). Using a combination of morphological and molecular approaches including fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and electronic microscopy observations, vesicomyid clam species and their associated symbionts were characterized and results were analyzed in light of geochemical conditions and other on-site observations. A greater diversity of vesicomyids was found at cold seep areas, where three different species were present (Phreagena soyoae [syn. kilmeri], Archivesica gigas, and Calyptogena pacifica). In contrast, A. gigas was the only species sampled across the hydrothermal vent area. The same haplotype of A. gigas was found in both hydrothermal vent and cold seep areas, highlighting possible contemporary exchanges among neighboring vents and seeps. In either ecosystem, molecular characterization of the symbionts confirmed the specificity between symbionts and hosts and supported the hypothesis of a predominantly vertical transmission. In addition, patterns of clams could reflect potential niche preferences for each species. The occurrence of numerous traces of vesicomyid movements on sediments in the sites colonized by A. gigas seemed to indicate that this species might have a better ability to move. Furthermore, variation in gill sulfur content could reveal a higher plasticity and sulfur storage capacity in A. gigas. Thus, the distribution of vesicomyid species across the chemosynthetic areas of the Guaymas Basin could be explained by differences in biological traits of the vesicomyid species that would allow A. gigas to more easily exploit transient and punctual sources of available sulfide than P. soyoae.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0173-9565 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000472949800006 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2605  
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Auteur Queiroz, N.; Humphries, N.E.; Couto, A.; Vedor, M.; da Costa, I.; Sequeira, A.M.M.; Mucientes, G.; Santos, A.M.; Abascal, F.J.; Abercrombie, D.L.; Abrantes, K.; Acuna-Marrero, D.; Afonso, A.S.; Afonso, P.; Anders, D.; Araujo, G.; Arauz, R.; Bach, P.; Barnett, A.; Bernal, D.; Berumen, M.L.; Lion, S.B.; Bezerra, N.P.A.; Blaison, A.V.; Block, B.A.; Bond, M.E.; Bonfil, R.; Bradford, R.W.; Braun, C.D.; Brooks, E.J.; Brooks, A.; Brown, J.; Bruce, B.D.; Byrne, M.E.; Campana, S.E.; Carlisle, A.B.; Chapman, D.D.; Chapple, T.K.; Chisholm, J.; Clarke, C.R.; Clua, E.G.; Cochran, J.E.M.; Crochelet, E.C.; Dagorn, L.; Daly, R.; Cortes, D.D.; Doyle, T.K.; Drew, M.; Duffy, C.A.J.; Erikson, T.; Espinoza, E.; Ferreira, L.C.; Ferretti, F.; Filmalter, J.D.; Fischer, G.C.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Fontes, J.; Forget, F.; Fowler, M.; Francis, M.P.; Gallagher, A.J.; Gennari, E.; Goldsworthy, S.D.; Gollock, M.J.; Green, J.R.; Gustafson, J.A.; Guttridge, T.L.; Guzman, H.M.; Hammerschlag, N.; Harman, L.; Hazin, F.H.V.; Heard, M.; Hearn, A.R.; Holdsworth, J.C.; Holmes, B.J.; Howey, L.A.; Hoyos, M.; Hueter, R.E.; Hussey, N.E.; Huveneers, C.; Irion, D.T.; Jacoby, D.M.P.; Jewell, O.J.D.; Johnson, R.; Jordan, L.K.B.; Jorgensen, S.J.; Joyce, W.; Daly, C.A.K.; Ketchum, J.T.; Klimley, A.P.; Kock, A.A.; Koen, P.; Ladino, F.; Lana, F.O.; Lea, J.S.E.; Llewellyn, F.; Lyon, W.S.; MacDonnell, A.; Macena, B.C.L.; Marshall, H.; McAllister, J.D.; McAuley, R.; Meyer, M.A.; Morris, J.J.; Nelson, E.R.; Papastamatiou, Y.P.; Patterson, T.A.; Penaherrera-Palma, C.; Pepperell, J.G.; Pierce, S.J.; Poisson, F.; Quintero, L.M.; Richardson, A.J.; Rogers, P.J.; Rohner, C.A.; Rowat, D.R.L.; Samoilys, M.; Semmens, J.M.; Sheaves, M.; Shillinger, G.; Shivji, M.; Singh, S.; Skomal, G.B.; Smale, M.J.; Snyders, L.B.; Soler, G.; Soria, M.; Stehfest, K.M.; Stevens, J.D.; Thorrold, S.R.; Tolotti, M.T.; Towner, A.; Travassos, P.; Tyminski, J.P.; Vandeperre, F.; Vaudo, J.J.; Watanabe, Y.Y.; Weber, S.B.; Wetherbee, B.M.; White, T.D.; Williams, S.; Zarate, P.M.; Harcourt, R.; Hays, G.C.; Meekan, M.G.; Thums, M.; Irigoien, X.; Eguiluz, V.M.; Duarte, C.M.; Sousa, L.L.; Simpson, S.J.; Southall, E.J.; Sims, D.W. doi  openurl
  Titre Global spatial risk assessment of sharks under the footprint of fisheries Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Nature  
  Volume 572 Numéro 7770 Pages 461-+  
  Mots-Clés bycatch; conservation; geolocation; improving light; model; movements; patterns; pelagic sharks; temperature; tracking  
  Résumé Effective ocean management and the conservation of highly migratory species depend on resolving the overlap between animal movements and distributions, and fishing effort. However, this information is lacking at a global scale. Here we show, using a big-data approach that combines satellite-tracked movements of pelagic sharks and global fishing fleets, that 24% of the mean monthly space used by sharks falls under the footprint of pelagic longline fisheries. Space-use hotspots of commercially valuable sharks and of internationally protected species had the highest overlap with longlines (up to 76% and 64%, respectively), and were also associated with significant increases in fishing effort. We conclude that pelagic sharks have limited spatial refuge from current levels of fishing effort in marine areas beyond national jurisdictions (the high seas). Our results demonstrate an urgent need for conservation and management measures at high-seas hotspots of shark space use, and highlight the potential of simultaneous satellite surveillance of megafauna and fishers as a tool for near-real-time, dynamic management.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000482219600033 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2614  
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