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Auteur Thiebault, A.; Tremblay, Y.
Titre Splitting animal trajectories into fine-scale behaviorally consistent movement units: breaking points relate to external stimuli in a foraging seabird Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Behav Ecol Sociobiol
Volume 67 Numéro 6 Pages 1013-1026
Mots-Clés Animal behavior; Biologging; Gps; Movement ecology; Segmentation
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 263
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Auteur Coz, R.; Ouisse, V.; Artero, C.; Carpentier, A.; Crave, A.; Feunteun, E.; Olivier, J.M.; Perrin, B.; Ysnel, F.
Titre Development of a new standardised method for sustainable monitoring of the vulnerable pink sea fan Eunicella verrucosa Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Biology
Volume 159 Numéro 6 Pages 1375-1388
Mots-Clés atlantic canada; cavolini coelenterata octocorallia; channel; gonadal development; gorgonian paramuricea-clavata; marine invertebrate; mediterranean-sea; modular growth; movement; northeast; singularis esper; water
Résumé The aim of this survey was to test a standardised method to follow the demographic evolution of a dense aggregative 'forest' population of the temperate gorgonian Eunicella verrucosa (Octocorallia, Gorgoniidae) using in situ photographic recordings. Distribution, density, growth and demographic evolution of the colonies was compared along two parallel transects. Computer treatment allowed the estimation of the total branch fan surface area, and the individual growth of tagged colonies was determined by measuring the increase in this surface area, using consecutive photographs taken at two-year intervals. To integrate the potential bias of branch overlapping, we proposed a correction factor between the in situ photographic surface area and the surface area of the gorgonian calculated from ex situ photographic surface area with all branches deployed. The surface-frequency distribution of colonies was converted to estimated-age-frequency distribution using an estimated growth curve based on the net growth rate. The technique used revealed significant differences in population structure and the dynamics of gorgonian colonies, as the two transects appeared to be influenced by different environmental conditions. The recruitment also seemed to vary according to year and transect, resulting in different densities. Our work showed clear results in characterising the variations of gorgonian demographic evolution at a small spatial scale; thus, it is assumed that this method could be a sustainable tool for coastal environmental managers.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0025-3162 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 539
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Auteur Suquet, M.; Cosson, J.; Donval, A.; Labbe, C.; Boulais, M.; Haffray, P.; Bernard, I.; Fauvel, C.
Titre Marathon vs sprint racers: an adaptation of sperm characteristics to the reproductive strategy of Pacific oyster, turbot and seabass Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Appl. Ichthyol.
Volume 28 Numéro 6 Pages 956-960
Mots-Clés activation; crassostrea-gigas; fertilization; marine fish; motility; movement; pecten-maximus; respiration; scophthalmus-maximus; spermatozoa
Résumé This work assesses the present knowledge on Pacific oyster sperm biology in comparison to two marine fish species (turbot and seabass) whose sperm characteristics are well described. Sperm morphology mainly differs by the presence of an acrosome in Pacific oyster which is absent in both fish species. In turbot as in Pacific oyster, a sperm maturation process along the genital tract is observed. Sperm motility is triggered by changes in osmolality for seabass and turbot and in pH for Pacific oyster. However, complementary factors are involved to maintain sperm immotile in the genital tract. Sperm movement duration is very long in Pacific oyster (2024 h), compared to turbot (35 min) and seabass (4050 s). A high capacity of ATP regeneration is observed in Pacific oyster sperm, sustained by the limited changes in its morphology observed at the end of the swimming phase. Then, the total distance covered by spermatozoa is very different among the studied species (seabass: 2 mm, turbot: 12 mm, Pacific oyster: 1 m). Considering the main characteristics of sperm movement, the three studied species can be separated in two groups: the sprint racer group (seabass: high velocity and short distance covered) and the marathonian racer one (Pacific oyster: low velocity but covering long distances). To an intermediate extent, turbot sperm belongs to the sprint racer group. Then, the two different sperm movement strategies observed in the three species, are compensated by the behaviour of the breeders.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0175-8659 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 701
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Auteur Sturrock, A.M.; Trueman, C.N.; Darnaude, A.M.; Hunter, E.
Titre Can otolith elemental chemistry retrospectively track migrations in fully marine fishes? Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Fish Biol.
Volume 81 Numéro 2 Pages 766-795
Mots-Clés chemical fingerprint; geolocation; microchemistry; movement; natural; tag; trace metals
Résumé Otolith microchemistry can provide valuable information about stock structure and mixing patterns when the magnitude of environmental differences among areas is greater than the cumulative influence of any vital effects. Here, the current understanding of the underlying mechanisms governing element incorporation into the otolith is reviewed. Hard and soft acid and base (HSAB) theory is employed to explore the differences in chemical behaviours, distributions and affinities between elements. Hard acid cations (e.g. Mg2+, Li+ and Ba2+) tend to be less physiologically influenced and accepted more readily into the otolith crystal lattice but are relatively homogeneous in seawater. Soft acid cations (e.g. Zn2+ and Cu2+) on the other hand, exhibit more varied distributions in seawater, but are more likely to be bound to blood proteins and less available for uptake into the otolith. The factors influencing the geographical distribution of elements in the sea, and their incorporation into the otoliths of marine fishes are reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on examining physiological processes, including gonad development, on the uptake of elements commonly used in population studies, notably Sr. Finally, case studies are presented that either directly or indirectly compare population structuring or movements inferred by otolith elemental fingerprints with the patterns indicated by additional, alternative proxies. The main obstacle currently limiting the application of otolith elemental microchemistry to infer movements of marine fishes appears to lie in the largely homogeneous distribution of those elements most reliably measured in the otolith. Evolving technologies will improve the discriminatory power of otolith chemistry by allowing measurement of spatially explicit, low level elements; however, for the time being, the combination of otolith minor and trace element fingerprints with alternative proxies and stable isotopic ratios can greatly extend the scope of migration studies. Among the otolith elements that routinely occur above instrument detection limits, Ba, Mn and Li were deemed the most likely to prove reliable geographic markers in marine species.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-1112 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 462
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Auteur Gruss, A.; Kaplan, D.; Guenette, S.; Roberts, C.M.; Botsford, L.W.
Titre Consequences of adult and juvenile movement for marine protected areas Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2011 Publication Revue Abrégée Biological Conservation
Volume 144 Numéro Pages 692-702
Mots-Clés areas; Density-dependent; Density-independent; Dynamic; marine; movement; (MPAs); MPAs; protected; Spillover; Targeted
Résumé Adult and juvenile mobility has a considerable influence on the functioning of marine protected areas. It is recognized that adult and juvenile movement reduces the core benefits of protected areas, namely protecting the full age-structure of marine populations, while at the same time perhaps improving fisheries yield over the no-reserve situation through export of individuals from protected areas. Nevertheless, the study of the consequences of movement on protected area functioning is unbalanced. Significant attention has been paid to the influence of certain movement patterns, such as diffusive movement and home ranges, while the impacts of others, such as density-dependent movements and ontogenetic migrations, have been relatively ignored. Here we review the diversity of density-independent and density-dependent movement patterns, as well as what is currently known about their consequences for the conservation and fisheries effects of marine protected areas. We highlight a number of 'partially addressed' issues in marine protected area research, such as the effects of reserves targeting specific life phases, and a number of essentially unstudied issues, such as density-dependent movements, nomadism, ontogenetic migrations, behavioral polymorphism and 'dynamic' reserves that adjust location as a realtime response to habitat changes. Assessing these issues will be essential to creating effective marine protected area networks for mobile species and accurately assessing reserve impacts on these species.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
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ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 141
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