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Auteur Moffitt, E.A.; Botsford, L.W.; Kaplan, D.; O'Farrell, M.R. url  openurl
  Titre Marine reserve networks for species that move within a home range Type Article scientifique
  Année 2009 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecological Applications  
  Volume (down) 19 Numéro 7 Pages 1835-1847  
  Mots-Clés adult movement; dispersal per recruit; fisheries; home range; marine; marine reserves; protected areas; spillover; sustainability; yield  
  Résumé Marine reserves are expected to benefit a wide range of species, but most models used to evaluate their effects assume that adults are sedentary, thereby potentially overestimating population persistence. Many nearshore marine organisms move within a home range as adults, and there is a need to understand the effects of this type of movement on reserve performance. We incorporated movement within a home range into a spatially explicit marine reserve model in order to assess the combined effects of adult and larval movement on persistence and yield in a general, strategic framework. We describe how the capacity of a population to persist decreased with increasing home range size in a manner that depended on whether the sedentary case was maintained by self persistence or network persistence. Self persistence declined gradually with increasing home range and larval dispersal distance, while network persistence decreased sharply to 0 above a threshold home range and was less dependent on larval dispersal distance. The maximum home range size protected by a reserve network increased with the fraction of coastline in reserves and decreasing exploitation rates outside reserves. Spillover due to movement within a home range contributed to yield moderately under certain conditions, although yield contributions were generally not as large as those from spillover due to larval dispersal. Our results indicate that, for species exhibiting home range behavior, persistence in a network of marine reserves may be more predictable than previously anticipated from models based solely on larval dispersal, in part due to better knowledge of home range sizes. Including movement within a home range can change persistence results significantly from those assuming that adults are sedentary; hence it is an important consideration in reserve design.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 34  
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Auteur Lagabrielle, E.; Allibert, A.; Kiszka, J.J.; Loiseau, N.; Kilfoil, J.P.; Lemahieu, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Environmental and anthropogenic factors affecting the increasing occurrence of shark-human interactions around a fast-developing Indian Ocean island Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci Rep  
  Volume (down) 8 Numéro Pages 3676  
  Mots-Clés coral-reefs; south-africa; florida; western-australia; carcharhinus-leucas; movement patterns; attack; bull shark; la reunion; reunion-island  
  Résumé Understanding the environmental drivers of interactions between predators and humans is critical for public safety and management purposes. In the marine environment, this issue is exemplified by shark-human interactions. The annual shark bite incidence rate (SBIR) in La Reunion (Indian Ocean) is among the highest in the world (up to 1 event per 24,000 hours of surfing) and has experienced a 23-fold increase over the 2005-2016 period. Since 1988, 86% of shark bite events on ocean-users involved surfers off the leeward coast, where 96% of surfing activities took place. We modeled the SBIR as a function of environmental variables, including benthic substrate, sea temperature and period of day. The SBIR peaked in winter, during the afternoon and dramatically increased on coral substrate since the mid-2000s. Seasonal patterns of increasing SBIR followed similar fluctuations of large coastal shark occurrences (particularly the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas), consistent with the hypothesis that higher shark presence may result in an increasing likelihood of shark bite events. Potential contributing factors and adaptation of ocean-users to the increasing shark bite hazard are discussed. This interdisciplinary research contributes to a better understanding of shark-human interactions. The modeling method is relevant for wildlife hazard management in general.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2314  
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Auteur Heerah, K.; Cox, S.L.; Blevin, P.; Guinet, C.; Charrassin, J.-B. doi  openurl
  Titre Validation of Dive Foraging Indices Using Archived and Transmitted Acceleration Data: The Case of the Weddell Seal Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Frontiers In Ecology And Evolution  
  Volume (down) 7 Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés diving behavior; foraging; biologging; accelerometers; movement ecology; satellite relayed data logger; sea-ice  
  Résumé Dive data collected from archival and satellite tags can provide valuable information on foraging activity via the characterization of movement patterns (e.g., wiggles, hunting time). However, a lack of validation limits interpretation of what these metrics truly represent in terms of behavior and how predators interact with prey. Head-mounted accelerometers have proven to be effective for detecting prey catch attempt (PrCA) behaviors, and thus can provide a more direct measure of foraging activity. However, device retrieval is typically required to access the high-resolution data they record, restricting use to animals returning to predictable locations. In this study, we present and validate data obtained from newly developed satellite-relay data tags, capable of remotely transmitting summaries of tri-axial accelerometer measurements. We then use these summaries to assess foraging metrics generated from dive data only. Tags were deployed on four female Weddell seals in November 2014 at Dumont d'Urville, and successfully acquired data over similar to 2 months. Retrieved archival data for one individual, and transmitted data for four individuals were used to (1) compare and validate abstracted accelerometer transmissions against outputs from established processing procedures, and (2) assess the validity of previously developed dive foraging indices, calculated solely from time-depth measurements. We found transmitted estimates of PrCA behaviors were generally comparable to those obtained from archival processing, although a small but consistent over-estimation was noted. Following this, dive foraging segments were identified either from (1) sinuosity in the trajectories of high-resolution depth archives, or (2) vertical speeds between low resolution transmissions of key depth inflection points along a dive profile. In both cases, more than 93% of the estimated PrCA behaviors (from either abstracted transmissions or archival processing) fell into inferred dive foraging segments (i.e., “hunting” segments), suggesting the two methods provide a reliable indicator of foraging effort. The validation of transmitted acceleration data and foraging indices derived fromtime-depth recordings for Weddell seals offers new avenues for the study of foraging activity and dive energetics. This is especially pertinent for species from which tag retrieval is challenging, but also for the post-processing of the numerous low-resolution dive datasets already available.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2296-701x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2590  
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Auteur Pirog, A.; Jaquemet, S.; Blaison, A.; Soria, M.; Magalon, H. doi  openurl
  Titre Isolation and characterization of eight microsatellite loci from Galeocerdo cuvier (tiger shark) and cross-amplification in Carcharhinus leucas, Carcharhinus brevipinna, Carcharhinus plumbeus and Sphyrna lewini Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée PeerJ  
  Volume (down) 4 Numéro Pages e2041  
  Mots-Clés age; bull; Carcharhiniform; Control region; growth; hawaiian waters; markers; microsatellites; movements; patterns; Population Genetics; software; western north-atlantic  
  Résumé The tiger shark Galeocerdo cuvier (Carcharhinidae) is a large elasmobranch suspected to have, as other apex predators, a keystone function in marine ecosystems and is currently considered Near Threatened (Red list IUCN). Knowledge on its ecology, which is crucial to design proper conservation and management plans, is very scarce. Here we describe the isolation of eight polymorphic microsatellite loci using 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing of enriched DNA libraries. Their characteristics were tested on a population of tiger shark (n = 101) from Reunion Island (South-Western Indian Ocean). All loci were polymorphic with a number of alleles ranging from two to eight. No null alleles were detected and no linkage disequilibrium was detected after Bonferroni correction. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.03 to 0.76 and from 0.03 to 0.77, respectively. No locus deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and the global F-IS of the population was of 0.04(NS). Some of the eight loci developed here successfully cross-amplified in the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas (one locus), the spinner shark Carcharhinus brevi pi n n a (four loci), the sandbar shark Carcharhinus plumbeus (five loci) and the scalloped hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini (two loci). We also designed primers to amplify and sequence a mitochondrial marker, the control region. We sequenced 862 bp and found a low genetic diversity, with four polymorphic sites, a haplotype diversity of 0.15 and a nucleotide diversity of 2 x 10(-4).  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1651  
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Auteur Thorne, L.H.; Hazen, E.L.; Bograd, S.J.; Foley, D.G.; Conners, M.G.; Kappes, M.A.; Kim, H.M.; Costa, D.P.; Tremblay, Y.; Shaffer, S.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Foraging behavior links climate variability and reproduction in North Pacific albatrosses Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Movement Ecology  
  Volume (down) 3 Numéro 1 Pages 27  
  Mots-Clés Albatross; Climate; Environmental variability; Movement; Reproductive success  
  Résumé Climate-driven environmental change in the North Pacific has been well documented, with marked effects on the habitat and foraging behavior of marine predators. However, the mechanistic linkages connecting climate-driven changes in behavior to predator populations are not well understood. We evaluated the effects of climate-driven environmental variability on the reproductive success and foraging behavior of Laysan and Black-footed albatrosses breeding in the Northwest Hawaiian Islands during both brooding and incubating periods. We assessed foraging trip metrics and reproductive success using data collected from 2002–2012 and 1981–2012, respectively, relative to variability in the location of the Transition Zone Chlorophyll Front (TZCF, an important foraging region for albatrosses), sea surface temperature (SST), Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI), and the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation index (NPGO).  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2051-3933 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1462  
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