bascule de visibilité Search & Display Options

Tout Sélectionner    Désélectionner
 |   | 
Détails
   print
  Enregistrements Liens
Auteur Sirot, C.; Gronkjaer, P.; Pedersen, J.B.; Panfili, J.; Zetina-Rejon, M.; Tripp-Valdez, A.; Ramos-Miranda, J.; Flores-Hernandez, D.; Sosa-Lopez, A.; Darnaude, A.M. doi  openurl
  Titre Using otolith organic matter to detect diet shifts in Bardiella chrysoura, during a period of environmental changes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.  
  Volume (down) 575 Numéro Pages 137-152  
  Mots-Clés aquatic ecosystems; Bairdiella chrysoura; climate-change; Coastal ecosystem; fish otoliths; food-web; movement patterns; prey availability; Stable isotope analysis; stable-isotope analysis; survival; temporal-changes; terminos lagoon; Trophic ecology; Trophic interactions  
  Résumé Accurate knowledge on fish trophic ecology and its modifications is crucial for understanding the impact of global change on ecosystems. In this context, we investigated the value of the delta C-13 and delta N-15 of otolith soluble organic matter (SOM) for identifying temporal diet shifts in American silver perch Bairdiella chrysoura over a 30-yr period characterized by strong changes in its population size and habitats within the Terminos Lagoon (Mexico). We first compared the otolith SOM isotopic signatures from present-clay adults to those of muscle and the main local prey. Our results suggest that otolith SOM can be confidently extracted and analyzed for both present and past otoliths of this species. The mean otolith SOM signatures obtained (-15.92 +/- 1.35%, for delta C-13 and 9.38 +/- 0.93%, for delta N-15) were consistent with those of the diet as 85% of the individual signatures were included within the prey isotopic niche area. Moreover, this study supports a trophic enrichment factor between diet and otolith (TEFdiet-otolith) close to 0 for delta N-15, while for delta C-13, the TEFololith-muscle of +0.02% warrants further investigation. Then, we compared past and contemporary otolith SOM signatures to investigate temporal diet shifts in B. chrysoura. This showed that 613C and delta N-15 differed significantly between the past and present period even if the temporal shift remained relatively small (respectively +1.17%, and 0.55%). The present study substantiates the use of otolith SOM delta C-13 and delta N-15 as a proxy of fish present and past trophic position, opening the possibility for major progress in studies of temporal changes in food web ecology.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2172  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Queiroz, N.; Humphries, N.E.; Couto, A.; Vedor, M.; da Costa, I.; Sequeira, A.M.M.; Mucientes, G.; Santos, A.M.; Abascal, F.J.; Abercrombie, D.L.; Abrantes, K.; Acuna-Marrero, D.; Afonso, A.S.; Afonso, P.; Anders, D.; Araujo, G.; Arauz, R.; Bach, P.; Barnett, A.; Bernal, D.; Berumen, M.L.; Lion, S.B.; Bezerra, N.P.A.; Blaison, A.V.; Block, B.A.; Bond, M.E.; Bonfil, R.; Bradford, R.W.; Braun, C.D.; Brooks, E.J.; Brooks, A.; Brown, J.; Bruce, B.D.; Byrne, M.E.; Campana, S.E.; Carlisle, A.B.; Chapman, D.D.; Chapple, T.K.; Chisholm, J.; Clarke, C.R.; Clua, E.G.; Cochran, J.E.M.; Crochelet, E.C.; Dagorn, L.; Daly, R.; Cortes, D.D.; Doyle, T.K.; Drew, M.; Duffy, C.A.J.; Erikson, T.; Espinoza, E.; Ferreira, L.C.; Ferretti, F.; Filmalter, J.D.; Fischer, G.C.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Fontes, J.; Forget, F.; Fowler, M.; Francis, M.P.; Gallagher, A.J.; Gennari, E.; Goldsworthy, S.D.; Gollock, M.J.; Green, J.R.; Gustafson, J.A.; Guttridge, T.L.; Guzman, H.M.; Hammerschlag, N.; Harman, L.; Hazin, F.H.V.; Heard, M.; Hearn, A.R.; Holdsworth, J.C.; Holmes, B.J.; Howey, L.A.; Hoyos, M.; Hueter, R.E.; Hussey, N.E.; Huveneers, C.; Irion, D.T.; Jacoby, D.M.P.; Jewell, O.J.D.; Johnson, R.; Jordan, L.K.B.; Jorgensen, S.J.; Joyce, W.; Daly, C.A.K.; Ketchum, J.T.; Klimley, A.P.; Kock, A.A.; Koen, P.; Ladino, F.; Lana, F.O.; Lea, J.S.E.; Llewellyn, F.; Lyon, W.S.; MacDonnell, A.; Macena, B.C.L.; Marshall, H.; McAllister, J.D.; McAuley, R.; Meyer, M.A.; Morris, J.J.; Nelson, E.R.; Papastamatiou, Y.P.; Patterson, T.A.; Penaherrera-Palma, C.; Pepperell, J.G.; Pierce, S.J.; Poisson, F.; Quintero, L.M.; Richardson, A.J.; Rogers, P.J.; Rohner, C.A.; Rowat, D.R.L.; Samoilys, M.; Semmens, J.M.; Sheaves, M.; Shillinger, G.; Shivji, M.; Singh, S.; Skomal, G.B.; Smale, M.J.; Snyders, L.B.; Soler, G.; Soria, M.; Stehfest, K.M.; Stevens, J.D.; Thorrold, S.R.; Tolotti, M.T.; Towner, A.; Travassos, P.; Tyminski, J.P.; Vandeperre, F.; Vaudo, J.J.; Watanabe, Y.Y.; Weber, S.B.; Wetherbee, B.M.; White, T.D.; Williams, S.; Zarate, P.M.; Harcourt, R.; Hays, G.C.; Meekan, M.G.; Thums, M.; Irigoien, X.; Eguiluz, V.M.; Duarte, C.M.; Sousa, L.L.; Simpson, S.J.; Southall, E.J.; Sims, D.W. doi  openurl
  Titre Global spatial risk assessment of sharks under the footprint of fisheries Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Nature  
  Volume (down) 572 Numéro 7770 Pages 461-+  
  Mots-Clés bycatch; conservation; geolocation; improving light; model; movements; patterns; pelagic sharks; temperature; tracking  
  Résumé Effective ocean management and the conservation of highly migratory species depend on resolving the overlap between animal movements and distributions, and fishing effort. However, this information is lacking at a global scale. Here we show, using a big-data approach that combines satellite-tracked movements of pelagic sharks and global fishing fleets, that 24% of the mean monthly space used by sharks falls under the footprint of pelagic longline fisheries. Space-use hotspots of commercially valuable sharks and of internationally protected species had the highest overlap with longlines (up to 76% and 64%, respectively), and were also associated with significant increases in fishing effort. We conclude that pelagic sharks have limited spatial refuge from current levels of fishing effort in marine areas beyond national jurisdictions (the high seas). Our results demonstrate an urgent need for conservation and management measures at high-seas hotspots of shark space use, and highlight the potential of simultaneous satellite surveillance of megafauna and fishers as a tool for near-real-time, dynamic management.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000482219600033 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2614  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Boyd, C.; Punt, A.E.; Weimerskirch, H.; Bertrand, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Movement models provide insights into variation in the foraging effort of central place foragers Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecological Modelling  
  Volume (down) 286 Numéro Pages 13-25  
  Mots-Clés Animal movement; Foraging ecology; Hidden Markov model; Provisioning theory; Seabirds; Sula variegata  
  Résumé Ecology and conservation depend on an understanding of how animals adjust their behaviour patterns in response to changes in their environment. Central place foragers (CPFs) are well-suited for developing ecological models of adaptive processes because their objective functions and operational constraints can be reasonably inferred. Central place foraging and provisioning theory provide the theoretical framework for this analysis. Analysis of CPF time allocation and energy budgets can provide insights into their strategies for responding to environmental variation. However, until recently, suitable high-resolution data on the behaviour of seabirds and other CPFs at sea have not been available. Previous studies of breeding seabirds have investigated variation in foraging trip duration and colony attendance, but few studies have analyzed variation in time allocation within foraging trips. Here, we develop a conceptual energy-based model for analysing variation in the time allocation of CPFs during foraging trips, and apply it to the movement patterns of Peruvian boobies (Sula variegata). Foraging trips of Peruvian boobies, recorded using high-resolution global positioning systems (GPS), were first partitioned into movement modes consistent with travel and foraging behaviours using a hidden Markov model (HMM) adapted to account for gaps in the GPS tracks associated with diving behaviour. Analysis of the HMM results based on the conceptual model indicated that differences in foraging effort between two treatments were best explained by a combination of differences in travel time and in time spent searching for prey. The conceptual model provides the basis for an integrated approach to analysis of variation in foraging strategies in which identification of various behaviours is coupled with assessments of time and energy budgets. This integrated approach can contribute to greater understanding of the processes determining foraging strategies and the limits to these strategies in the context of competition for resources and global climate change.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3800 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 355  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Coz, R.; Ouisse, V.; Artero, C.; Carpentier, A.; Crave, A.; Feunteun, E.; Olivier, J.M.; Perrin, B.; Ysnel, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Development of a new standardised method for sustainable monitoring of the vulnerable pink sea fan Eunicella verrucosa Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Biology  
  Volume (down) 159 Numéro 6 Pages 1375-1388  
  Mots-Clés atlantic canada; cavolini coelenterata octocorallia; channel; gonadal development; gorgonian paramuricea-clavata; marine invertebrate; mediterranean-sea; modular growth; movement; northeast; singularis esper; water  
  Résumé The aim of this survey was to test a standardised method to follow the demographic evolution of a dense aggregative 'forest' population of the temperate gorgonian Eunicella verrucosa (Octocorallia, Gorgoniidae) using in situ photographic recordings. Distribution, density, growth and demographic evolution of the colonies was compared along two parallel transects. Computer treatment allowed the estimation of the total branch fan surface area, and the individual growth of tagged colonies was determined by measuring the increase in this surface area, using consecutive photographs taken at two-year intervals. To integrate the potential bias of branch overlapping, we proposed a correction factor between the in situ photographic surface area and the surface area of the gorgonian calculated from ex situ photographic surface area with all branches deployed. The surface-frequency distribution of colonies was converted to estimated-age-frequency distribution using an estimated growth curve based on the net growth rate. The technique used revealed significant differences in population structure and the dynamics of gorgonian colonies, as the two transects appeared to be influenced by different environmental conditions. The recruitment also seemed to vary according to year and transect, resulting in different densities. Our work showed clear results in characterising the variations of gorgonian demographic evolution at a small spatial scale; thus, it is assumed that this method could be a sustainable tool for coastal environmental managers.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0025-3162 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 539  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Gruss, A.; Kaplan, D.; Guenette, S.; Roberts, C.M.; Botsford, L.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Consequences of adult and juvenile movement for marine protected areas Type Article scientifique
  Année 2011 Publication Revue Abrégée Biological Conservation  
  Volume (down) 144 Numéro Pages 692-702  
  Mots-Clés areas; Density-dependent; Density-independent; Dynamic; marine; movement; (MPAs); MPAs; protected; Spillover; Targeted  
  Résumé Adult and juvenile mobility has a considerable influence on the functioning of marine protected areas. It is recognized that adult and juvenile movement reduces the core benefits of protected areas, namely protecting the full age-structure of marine populations, while at the same time perhaps improving fisheries yield over the no-reserve situation through export of individuals from protected areas. Nevertheless, the study of the consequences of movement on protected area functioning is unbalanced. Significant attention has been paid to the influence of certain movement patterns, such as diffusive movement and home ranges, while the impacts of others, such as density-dependent movements and ontogenetic migrations, have been relatively ignored. Here we review the diversity of density-independent and density-dependent movement patterns, as well as what is currently known about their consequences for the conservation and fisheries effects of marine protected areas. We highlight a number of 'partially addressed' issues in marine protected area research, such as the effects of reserves targeting specific life phases, and a number of essentially unstudied issues, such as density-dependent movements, nomadism, ontogenetic migrations, behavioral polymorphism and 'dynamic' reserves that adjust location as a realtime response to habitat changes. Assessing these issues will be essential to creating effective marine protected area networks for mobile species and accurately assessing reserve impacts on these species.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 141  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
Tout Sélectionner    Désélectionner
 |   | 
Détails
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: