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Auteur Sturrock, A.M.; Trueman, C.N.; Darnaude, A.M.; Hunter, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Can otolith elemental chemistry retrospectively track migrations in fully marine fishes? Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Fish Biol.  
  Volume 81 Numéro 2 Pages 766-795  
  Mots-Clés chemical fingerprint; geolocation; microchemistry; movement; natural; tag; trace metals  
  Résumé Otolith microchemistry can provide valuable information about stock structure and mixing patterns when the magnitude of environmental differences among areas is greater than the cumulative influence of any vital effects. Here, the current understanding of the underlying mechanisms governing element incorporation into the otolith is reviewed. Hard and soft acid and base (HSAB) theory is employed to explore the differences in chemical behaviours, distributions and affinities between elements. Hard acid cations (e.g. Mg2+, Li+ and Ba2+) tend to be less physiologically influenced and accepted more readily into the otolith crystal lattice but are relatively homogeneous in seawater. Soft acid cations (e.g. Zn2+ and Cu2+) on the other hand, exhibit more varied distributions in seawater, but are more likely to be bound to blood proteins and less available for uptake into the otolith. The factors influencing the geographical distribution of elements in the sea, and their incorporation into the otoliths of marine fishes are reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on examining physiological processes, including gonad development, on the uptake of elements commonly used in population studies, notably Sr. Finally, case studies are presented that either directly or indirectly compare population structuring or movements inferred by otolith elemental fingerprints with the patterns indicated by additional, alternative proxies. The main obstacle currently limiting the application of otolith elemental microchemistry to infer movements of marine fishes appears to lie in the largely homogeneous distribution of those elements most reliably measured in the otolith. Evolving technologies will improve the discriminatory power of otolith chemistry by allowing measurement of spatially explicit, low level elements; however, for the time being, the combination of otolith minor and trace element fingerprints with alternative proxies and stable isotopic ratios can greatly extend the scope of migration studies. Among the otolith elements that routinely occur above instrument detection limits, Ba, Mn and Li were deemed the most likely to prove reliable geographic markers in marine species.  
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  ISSN 0022-1112 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection (down) 462  
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Auteur Boyd, C.; Punt, A.E.; Weimerskirch, H.; Bertrand, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Movement models provide insights into variation in the foraging effort of central place foragers Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecological Modelling  
  Volume 286 Numéro Pages 13-25  
  Mots-Clés Animal movement; Foraging ecology; Hidden Markov model; Provisioning theory; Seabirds; Sula variegata  
  Résumé Ecology and conservation depend on an understanding of how animals adjust their behaviour patterns in response to changes in their environment. Central place foragers (CPFs) are well-suited for developing ecological models of adaptive processes because their objective functions and operational constraints can be reasonably inferred. Central place foraging and provisioning theory provide the theoretical framework for this analysis. Analysis of CPF time allocation and energy budgets can provide insights into their strategies for responding to environmental variation. However, until recently, suitable high-resolution data on the behaviour of seabirds and other CPFs at sea have not been available. Previous studies of breeding seabirds have investigated variation in foraging trip duration and colony attendance, but few studies have analyzed variation in time allocation within foraging trips. Here, we develop a conceptual energy-based model for analysing variation in the time allocation of CPFs during foraging trips, and apply it to the movement patterns of Peruvian boobies (Sula variegata). Foraging trips of Peruvian boobies, recorded using high-resolution global positioning systems (GPS), were first partitioned into movement modes consistent with travel and foraging behaviours using a hidden Markov model (HMM) adapted to account for gaps in the GPS tracks associated with diving behaviour. Analysis of the HMM results based on the conceptual model indicated that differences in foraging effort between two treatments were best explained by a combination of differences in travel time and in time spent searching for prey. The conceptual model provides the basis for an integrated approach to analysis of variation in foraging strategies in which identification of various behaviours is coupled with assessments of time and energy budgets. This integrated approach can contribute to greater understanding of the processes determining foraging strategies and the limits to these strategies in the context of competition for resources and global climate change.  
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  ISSN 0304-3800 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection (down) 355  
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Auteur Fablet, R.; Chaigneau, A.; Bertrand, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Multiscale analysis of geometric planar deformations : application to wild animal electronic tracking and satellite ocean observation data Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ieee Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing  
  Volume 52 Numéro 6 Pages 3627-3636  
  Mots-Clés Animal movements; geophysical fields; multiscale geometry; planar curve; trajectory analysis; wavelet analysis  
  Résumé The development of animal tracking technologies (including GPS and ARGOS satellite systems) and the increasing resolution of remote-sensing observations call for tools extracting and describing the geometric patterns along a track or within an image over a wide range of spatial scales. Whereas shape analysis has largely been addressed over the last decades, the multiscale analysis of the geometry of opened planar curves has received little attention. We here show that classical multiscale techniques cannot properly address this issue and propose an original wavelet-based scheme. To highlight the generic nature of our multiscale wavelet technique, we report applications to two different observation data sets, namely, wild animal movement paths recorded by electronic tags and satellite observations of sea-surface geophysical fields.  
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  ISSN 0196-2892 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection (down) 328  
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Auteur Thiebault, A.; Tremblay, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Splitting animal trajectories into fine-scale behaviorally consistent movement units: breaking points relate to external stimuli in a foraging seabird Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Behav Ecol Sociobiol  
  Volume 67 Numéro 6 Pages 1013-1026  
  Mots-Clés Animal behavior; Biologging; Gps; Movement ecology; Segmentation  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection (down) 263  
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Auteur Gruss, A.; Kaplan, D.; Guenette, S.; Roberts, C.M.; Botsford, L.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Consequences of adult and juvenile movement for marine protected areas Type Article scientifique
  Année 2011 Publication Revue Abrégée Biological Conservation  
  Volume 144 Numéro Pages 692-702  
  Mots-Clés areas; Density-dependent; Density-independent; Dynamic; marine; movement; (MPAs); MPAs; protected; Spillover; Targeted  
  Résumé Adult and juvenile mobility has a considerable influence on the functioning of marine protected areas. It is recognized that adult and juvenile movement reduces the core benefits of protected areas, namely protecting the full age-structure of marine populations, while at the same time perhaps improving fisheries yield over the no-reserve situation through export of individuals from protected areas. Nevertheless, the study of the consequences of movement on protected area functioning is unbalanced. Significant attention has been paid to the influence of certain movement patterns, such as diffusive movement and home ranges, while the impacts of others, such as density-dependent movements and ontogenetic migrations, have been relatively ignored. Here we review the diversity of density-independent and density-dependent movement patterns, as well as what is currently known about their consequences for the conservation and fisheries effects of marine protected areas. We highlight a number of 'partially addressed' issues in marine protected area research, such as the effects of reserves targeting specific life phases, and a number of essentially unstudied issues, such as density-dependent movements, nomadism, ontogenetic migrations, behavioral polymorphism and 'dynamic' reserves that adjust location as a realtime response to habitat changes. Assessing these issues will be essential to creating effective marine protected area networks for mobile species and accurately assessing reserve impacts on these species.  
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  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection (down) 141  
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