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Auteur Thiebault, A.; Tremblay, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Splitting animal trajectories into fine-scale behaviorally consistent movement units: breaking points relate to external stimuli in a foraging seabird Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Behav Ecol Sociobiol  
  Volume 67 Numéro 6 Pages 1013-1026  
  Mots-Clés Animal behavior; Biologging; Gps; Movement ecology; Segmentation  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 263  
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Auteur Lagabrielle, E.; Allibert, A.; Kiszka, J.J.; Loiseau, N.; Kilfoil, J.P.; Lemahieu, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Environmental and anthropogenic factors affecting the increasing occurrence of shark-human interactions around a fast-developing Indian Ocean island Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Sci Rep  
  Volume 8 Numéro Pages 3676  
  Mots-Clés coral-reefs; south-africa; florida; western-australia; carcharhinus-leucas; movement patterns; attack; bull shark; la reunion; reunion-island  
  Résumé Understanding the environmental drivers of interactions between predators and humans is critical for public safety and management purposes. In the marine environment, this issue is exemplified by shark-human interactions. The annual shark bite incidence rate (SBIR) in La Reunion (Indian Ocean) is among the highest in the world (up to 1 event per 24,000 hours of surfing) and has experienced a 23-fold increase over the 2005-2016 period. Since 1988, 86% of shark bite events on ocean-users involved surfers off the leeward coast, where 96% of surfing activities took place. We modeled the SBIR as a function of environmental variables, including benthic substrate, sea temperature and period of day. The SBIR peaked in winter, during the afternoon and dramatically increased on coral substrate since the mid-2000s. Seasonal patterns of increasing SBIR followed similar fluctuations of large coastal shark occurrences (particularly the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas), consistent with the hypothesis that higher shark presence may result in an increasing likelihood of shark bite events. Potential contributing factors and adaptation of ocean-users to the increasing shark bite hazard are discussed. This interdisciplinary research contributes to a better understanding of shark-human interactions. The modeling method is relevant for wildlife hazard management in general.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2314  
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Auteur Drouineau, H.; Lobry, J.; Bez, N.; Travers-Trolet, M.; Vermard, Y.; Gascuel, D. doi  openurl
  Titre The need for a protean fisheries science to address the degradation of exploited aquatic ecosystems Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Aquat. Living Resour.  
  Volume 29 Numéro 2 Pages Unsp-E201  
  Mots-Clés climate-change; eafm; Ecology; Fisheries management; fisheries science; individual-based model; Management strategy evaluation; marine ecosystems; marine resources; models; Movement; ocean; Sustainability; uncertainty; vms data  
  Résumé In this introductory paper we highlight key questions that were discussed during the symposium on “Status, functioning and shifts in marine ecosystems” organized by the Association Francaise d'Halieutique (French Association for Fisheries Sciences, Montpellier, France, July 2015). This symposium illustrated that fisheries science is now working at multiple scales and on all dimensions of socio-ecosystems (ecological, political, sociological, and economic), with a great diversity of approaches and taking into account different levels of complexity while acknowledging diverse sources of uncertainty. We argue that we should go one step further and call for a protean fisheries science to address the deteriorated states of aquatic ecosystems caused by anthropogenic pressures. Protean science is constantly evolving to meet emerging issues, while improving its coherence and integration capacity in its complexity. This science must be nourished by multiple approaches and be capable of addressing all organizational scales, from individual fish or fishermen up to the entire ecosystem, include society, its economy and the services it derives from aquatic systems. Such a protean science is required to address the complexity of ecosystem functioning and of the impacts of anthropogenic pressures.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  ISSN 0990-7440 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2066  
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Auteur Coz, R.; Ouisse, V.; Artero, C.; Carpentier, A.; Crave, A.; Feunteun, E.; Olivier, J.M.; Perrin, B.; Ysnel, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Development of a new standardised method for sustainable monitoring of the vulnerable pink sea fan Eunicella verrucosa Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Marine Biology  
  Volume 159 Numéro 6 Pages 1375-1388  
  Mots-Clés atlantic canada; cavolini coelenterata octocorallia; channel; gonadal development; gorgonian paramuricea-clavata; marine invertebrate; mediterranean-sea; modular growth; movement; northeast; singularis esper; water  
  Résumé The aim of this survey was to test a standardised method to follow the demographic evolution of a dense aggregative 'forest' population of the temperate gorgonian Eunicella verrucosa (Octocorallia, Gorgoniidae) using in situ photographic recordings. Distribution, density, growth and demographic evolution of the colonies was compared along two parallel transects. Computer treatment allowed the estimation of the total branch fan surface area, and the individual growth of tagged colonies was determined by measuring the increase in this surface area, using consecutive photographs taken at two-year intervals. To integrate the potential bias of branch overlapping, we proposed a correction factor between the in situ photographic surface area and the surface area of the gorgonian calculated from ex situ photographic surface area with all branches deployed. The surface-frequency distribution of colonies was converted to estimated-age-frequency distribution using an estimated growth curve based on the net growth rate. The technique used revealed significant differences in population structure and the dynamics of gorgonian colonies, as the two transects appeared to be influenced by different environmental conditions. The recruitment also seemed to vary according to year and transect, resulting in different densities. Our work showed clear results in characterising the variations of gorgonian demographic evolution at a small spatial scale; thus, it is assumed that this method could be a sustainable tool for coastal environmental managers.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0025-3162 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 539  
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Auteur Moffitt, E.A.; Botsford, L.W.; Kaplan, D.; O'Farrell, M.R. url  openurl
  Titre Marine reserve networks for species that move within a home range Type Article scientifique
  Année 2009 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Ecological Applications  
  Volume 19 Numéro 7 Pages 1835-1847  
  Mots-Clés adult movement; dispersal per recruit; fisheries; home range; marine; marine reserves; protected areas; spillover; sustainability; yield  
  Résumé Marine reserves are expected to benefit a wide range of species, but most models used to evaluate their effects assume that adults are sedentary, thereby potentially overestimating population persistence. Many nearshore marine organisms move within a home range as adults, and there is a need to understand the effects of this type of movement on reserve performance. We incorporated movement within a home range into a spatially explicit marine reserve model in order to assess the combined effects of adult and larval movement on persistence and yield in a general, strategic framework. We describe how the capacity of a population to persist decreased with increasing home range size in a manner that depended on whether the sedentary case was maintained by self persistence or network persistence. Self persistence declined gradually with increasing home range and larval dispersal distance, while network persistence decreased sharply to 0 above a threshold home range and was less dependent on larval dispersal distance. The maximum home range size protected by a reserve network increased with the fraction of coastline in reserves and decreasing exploitation rates outside reserves. Spillover due to movement within a home range contributed to yield moderately under certain conditions, although yield contributions were generally not as large as those from spillover due to larval dispersal. Our results indicate that, for species exhibiting home range behavior, persistence in a network of marine reserves may be more predictable than previously anticipated from models based solely on larval dispersal, in part due to better knowledge of home range sizes. Including movement within a home range can change persistence results significantly from those assuming that adults are sedentary; hence it is an important consideration in reserve design.  
  Adresse  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 34  
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