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Auteur Carpentier, A.S.; Berthe, C.; Ender, I.; Jaine, F.R.A.; Mourier, J.; Stevens, G.; De Rosemont, M.; Clua, E. doi  openurl
  Titre Preliminary insights into the population characteristics and distribution of reef (Mobula alfredi) and oceanic (M. birostris) manta rays in French Polynesia Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Coral Reefs  
  Volume 38 Numéro 6 Pages 1197-1210  
  Mots-Clés aggregation; australia; bottle-nosed dolphins; california; Citizen science; conservation; Ecotourism management; habitat use; identification; marine park; movements; sharks; Site fidelity; Spatial connectivity; Sympatry  
  Résumé In French Polynesia, both currently recognized manta ray species, Mobula alfredi and M. birostris, are observed. Despite being an important cultural asset and generating significant economic benefits through manta ray watching tourism, published data on the ecology and threats to these species in the region are scarce. Based on an 18-year dataset of sighting records collected by citizen scientists and during two scientific expeditions, this study provides the first insights into the population characteristics and regional distribution of the two manta ray species in French Polynesia. A total of 1347 manta ray photographs (1337 for M. alfredi and 10 for M. birostris) were examined for the period January 2001-December 2017, with photo-identification techniques leading to the successful identification of 317 individual M. alfredi and 10 individual M. birostris throughout the Society, Tuamotu and Marquesas Islands. We provide the first confirmation of sympatric distribution of both species in the Society Islands. Our results highlight strong and long-term site fidelity of M. alfredi individuals to certain aggregation sites (> 9 years for 16 individuals) and reveal some degree of connectivity between populations, with 10 individuals recorded moving between islands located up to 50 km apart. Analysis of photographs of individuals bearing sub-lethal injuries (n = 68) suggests that M. alfredi are more likely to be injured at inhabited islands (Maupiti or Bora Bora; 75% of all injured individuals) than at uninhabited islands, with 75% of injuries related to boat propeller strikes and fishing gear entanglements. Our findings emphasize the need for further research to allow for a comprehensive evaluation of population structure, size and threats to manta rays in this region.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0722-4028 ISBN Médium (up)  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000496024100010 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2658  
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Auteur van Gils, J.A.; van der Geest, M.; De Meulenaer, B.; Gillis, H.; Piersma, T.; Folmer, E.O. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Moving on with foraging theory: incorporating movement decisions into the functional response of a gregarious shorebird Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Animal Ecology  
  Volume 84 Numéro Pages 554-564  
  Mots-Clés competition continuous-time Markov chain cryptic interference diet distribution habitat choice intake rate movement ecology predation toxic prey SPATIAL-DISTRIBUTION RED KNOTS MODELING INTERFERENCE CRYPTIC INTERFERENCE STOCHASTIC VERSION BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY MULTISTATE MODELS BANC-DARGUIN GROUP-SIZE PREY Ecology Zoology  
  Résumé 1. Models relating intake rate to food abundance and competitor density (generalized functional response models) can predict forager distributions and movements between patches, but we lack understanding of how distributions and small-scale movements by the foragers themselves affect intake rates. Using a state-of-the-art approach based on continuous-time Markov chain dynamics, we add realism to classic functional response models by acknowledging that the chances to encounter food and competitors are influenced by movement decisions, and, vice versa, that movement decisions are influenced by these encounters. We used a multi-state modelling framework to construct a stochastic functional response model in which foragers alternate between three behavioural states: searching, handling and moving. Using behavioural observations on a molluscivore migrant shorebird (red knot, Calidris canutus canutus), at its main wintering area (Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania), we estimated transition rates between foraging states as a function of conspecific densities and densities of the two main bivalve prey. Intake rate decreased with conspecific density. This interference effect was not due to decreased searching efficiency, but resulted from time lost to avoidance movements. Red knots showed a strong functional response to one prey (Dosinia isocardia), but a weak response to the other prey (Loripes lucinalis). This corroborates predictions from a recently developed optimal diet model that accounts for the mildly toxic effects due to consuming Loripes. Using model averaging across the most plausible multi-state models, the fully parameterized functional response model was then used to predict intake rate for an independent data set on habitat choice by red knot. Comparison of the sites selected by red knots with random sampling sites showed that the birds fed at sites with higher than average Loripes and Dosinia densities, that is sites for which we predicted higher than average intake rates. We discuss the limitations of Holling's classic functional response model which ignores movement and the limitations of contemporary movement ecological theory that ignores consumer-resource interactions. With the rapid advancement of technologies to track movements of individual foragers at fine spatial scales, the time is ripe to integrate descriptive tracking studies with stochastic movement-based functional response models.  
  Adresse [van Gils, Jan A.; van der Geest, Matthijs; De Meulenaer, Brecht; Gillis, Hanneke; Piersma, Theunis; Folmer, Eelke O.] NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Dept Marine Ecol, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands. [van der Geest, Matthijs; Piersma, Theunis] Univ Groningen, Anim Ecol Grp, Ctr Ecol & Evolutionary Studies CEES, Chair Global Flyway Ecol, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands. van Gils, JA (reprint author), NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Dept Marine Ecol, POB 59, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands. Jan.van.Gils@nioz.nl  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0021-8790 ISBN Médium (up)  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes ISI Document Delivery No.: CB9RB Times Cited: 0 Cited Reference Count: 61 van Gils, Jan A. van der Geest, Matthijs De Meulenaer, Brecht Gillis, Hanneke Piersma, Theunis Folmer, Eelke O. NWO WOTRO [W.01.65.221.00]; NWO [R 84-639]; NWO VIDI [864.09.002] We thank Parc National du Banc d'Arguin (PNBA) for their hospitality, the hosting of our presence and the permission to work in and from the Iwik scientific station. Lemhaba ould Yarba made the logistic arrangements. Joop van Eerbeek, Erik J. Jansen, Han Olff and El-Hacen Mohamed El-Hacen helped collecting and sorting benthos samples. Valuable comments on the manuscript were given by Allert Bijleveld, Jaap van der Meer, Ola Olsson, Thomas Oudman, Isabel M. Smallegange, an anonymous referee and by the 'literature club' of the Centre for Integrative Ecology during JAvG's sabbatical at Deakin University. Dick Visser polished the figures. This work is supported by an NWO WOTRO Integrated Programme grant (W.01.65.221.00) to TP, an NWO travel grant (R 84-639) to EOF, and an NWO VIDI grant (864.09.002) to JAvG. 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL HOBOKEN J ANIM ECOL Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ 1412 collection 1383  
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Auteur Bonnin, L.; Robbins, W.D.; Boussarie, G.; Kiszka, J.J.; Dagorn, L.; Mouillot, D.; Vigliola, L. doi  openurl
  Titre Repeated long-range migrations of adult males in a common Indo-Pacific reef shark Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Coral Reefs  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés carcharhinus-amblyrhynchos; carcharias; fidelity; Male-biased dispersal; Migration; movements; New Caledonia; patterns; philopatry; population; Reef shark; residency; site; Telemetry; white sharks  
  Résumé The grey reef shark, Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos, is one of the most abundant coral reef sharks throughout the Indo-Pacific. However, this species has been critically impacted across its range, with well-documented population declines of > 90% attributed to human activities. A key knowledge gap in the successful implementation of grey reef shark conservation plans is the understanding of large-scale movement patterns, along with the associated biological and ecological drivers. To address this shortfall, we acoustically monitored 147 adult and juvenile grey reef sharks of all sexes for more than 2 yr across the New Caledonian archipelago, West Pacific. Here, we document multiple adult males undertaking return journeys of up to nearly 700 km in consecutive years. This constitutes the first evidence of repeated long-range migrations for this species. Although only a limited number of adult males were definitively tracked undertaking migrations, similar timing in changes in the detection patterns of a further 13 animals, mostly adult males, suggests this behavior may be more common than previously thought. The paucity of evidence for juvenile migrations and timing of adult movements suggest that mating is the motivation behind these migrations. Our results have important implications for management, given the potential of mature individuals to recurrently travel outside managed or protected areas. Future management of this species clearly needs to consider the importance of large-scale migratory behaviors when developing management plans.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0722-4028 ISBN Médium (up)  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000496832900001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2670  
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Auteur Mourier, J.; Ballesta, L.; Clua, E.; Planes, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Visitation patterns of camouflage groupers Epinephelus polyphekadion at a spawning aggregation in Fakarava inferred by acoustic telemetry Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Coral Reefs  
  Volume 38 Numéro 5 Pages 909-916  
  Mots-Clés brown-marbled grouper; Conservation; dynamics; Epinephelus polyphekadion; Fakarava; French Polynesia; movement; Reproduction; Serranidae: Epinephelinae; snapper  
  Résumé Many species of groupers form transient fish spawning aggregations (FSAs) that are both spatially and temporally predictable, making them highly vulnerable to fishing. Consequently, many known aggregations have disappeared, making the collection of additional baseline data imperative to inform management actions and decisions that have the capacity to protect these important areas in the long term. Using acoustic telemetry and underwater observations, we document the spatio-temporal dynamics of the camouflage grouper Epinephelus polyphekadion at a FSA in Fakarava, French Polynesia. We show that grouper arrival at the aggregation site started 2 weeks before the full moon with a core area density that increased from 0.13 to 1.25 fish m(-2) during the observation period. Following reproduction, almost all camouflage groupers left the FSA site within 48 h. Among 30 tagged groupers in 2011 and despite a relatively low receiver coverage in the pass, 30% returned to the FSA the following year confirming patterns of FSA site fidelity of the species found in previous studies at other locations. Our results confirm that the current management procedures protecting the FSA under the UNESCO biosphere reserve are critical in maintaining the functional role of the FSA by ensuring the persistence and sustainability of large and healthy populations of groupers and sharks.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0722-4028 ISBN Médium (up)  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000510855000003 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2739  
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Auteur Rouyer, T.; Bonhommeau, S.; Giordano, N.; Giordano, F.; Ellul, S.; Ellul, G.; Deguara, S.; Wendling, B.; Bernard, S.; Kerzerho, V. doi  openurl
  Titre Tagging Atlantic bluefin tuna from a Mediterranean spawning ground using a purse seiner Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Fish Res.  
  Volume 226 Numéro Pages 105522  
  Mots-Clés Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean stock; Electronic tagging; Large Atlantic bluefin tuna; migration; Migrations; movements; population-structure; Purse seine; thermal biology; thunnus-thynnus  
  Résumé Atlantic bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus, is as an emblematic and commercially valuable large pelagic species. In the past ten years, the purse seine fishery in the Mediterranean represents more than 50 % of the catch. Nowadays, purse seines target large fish and operate during the spawning season in the spawning grounds. Electronic tagging has shed a considerable amount of light on the ecology and behaviour of bluefin tuna over the past twenty years. However, such technique has rarely been applied on large bluefin tunas caught by the Mediterranean purse seine fishery despite its major importance. The logistical constraints related to this specific fishery, combined with the timing of migration of the fish and the requirements related to the handling of big fish have made adequate tagging from purse seines complex. Here we detail such an operation, designed to bridge the knowledge gap on the migratory behaviour of tunas targeted by the purse seine fishery. Three large bluefin tunas from the same school were tagged during the fishing operation of a French purse seine, resulting in a different migration pattern than previous deployments. The fish were tagged onboard in less than 2 min and efficiently, avoiding any subsequent mortality. These results contrast with those from tagging operations carried out in the Northwest Mediterranean, which underlies the importance of tagging operations from purse seines to obtain unbiased description of the movements of the eastern Atlantic bluefin tuna stock in the context of its management.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium (up)  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000525305200010 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2771  
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