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Auteur Kadar, J.; Ladds, M.; Mourier, J.; Day, J.; Brown, C. doi  openurl
  Titre Acoustic accelerometry reveals diel activity patterns in premigratory Port Jackson sharks Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Evol.  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés (up) accelerometer; activity budgets; activity pattern; behavior; diel cycle; habitat; heterodontus-portusjacksoni; lobsters; migratory restlessness; movement; Port Jackson shark; reef sharks; regression; root mean square acceleration; vertical migrations; wild  
  Résumé Distinguishing the factors that influence activity within a species advances understanding of their behavior and ecology. Continuous observation in the marine environment is not feasible but biotelemetry devices provide an opportunity for detailed analysis of movements and activity patterns. This study investigated the detail that calibration of accelerometers measuring root mean square (RMS) acceleration with video footage can add to understanding the activity patterns of male and female Port Jackson sharks (Heterodontus portusjacksoni) in a captive environment. Linear regression was used to relate RMS acceleration output to time-matched behavior captured on video to quantify diel activity patterns. To validate captive data, diel patterns from captive sharks were compared with diel movement data from free-ranging sharks using passive acoustic tracking. The RMS acceleration data showed captive sharks exhibited nocturnal diel patterns peaking during the late evening before midnight and decreasing before sunrise. Correlation analysis revealed that captive animals displayed similar activity patterns to free-ranging sharks. The timing of wild shark departures for migration in the late breeding season corresponded with elevated diel activity at night within the captive individuals, suggesting a form of migratory restlessness in captivity. By directly relating RMS acceleration output to activity level, we show that sex, time of day, and sex-specific seasonal behavior all influenced activity levels. This study contributes to a growing body of evidence that RMS acceleration data are a promising method to determine activity patterns of cryptic marine animals and can provide more detailed information when validated in captivity.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000478172800001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2623  
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Auteur Suquet, M.; Cosson, J.; Donval, A.; Labbe, C.; Boulais, M.; Haffray, P.; Bernard, I.; Fauvel, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Marathon vs sprint racers: an adaptation of sperm characteristics to the reproductive strategy of Pacific oyster, turbot and seabass Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Appl. Ichthyol.  
  Volume 28 Numéro 6 Pages 956-960  
  Mots-Clés (up) activation; crassostrea-gigas; fertilization; marine fish; motility; movement; pecten-maximus; respiration; scophthalmus-maximus; spermatozoa  
  Résumé This work assesses the present knowledge on Pacific oyster sperm biology in comparison to two marine fish species (turbot and seabass) whose sperm characteristics are well described. Sperm morphology mainly differs by the presence of an acrosome in Pacific oyster which is absent in both fish species. In turbot as in Pacific oyster, a sperm maturation process along the genital tract is observed. Sperm motility is triggered by changes in osmolality for seabass and turbot and in pH for Pacific oyster. However, complementary factors are involved to maintain sperm immotile in the genital tract. Sperm movement duration is very long in Pacific oyster (2024 h), compared to turbot (35 min) and seabass (4050 s). A high capacity of ATP regeneration is observed in Pacific oyster sperm, sustained by the limited changes in its morphology observed at the end of the swimming phase. Then, the total distance covered by spermatozoa is very different among the studied species (seabass: 2 mm, turbot: 12 mm, Pacific oyster: 1 m). Considering the main characteristics of sperm movement, the three studied species can be separated in two groups: the sprint racer group (seabass: high velocity and short distance covered) and the marathonian racer one (Pacific oyster: low velocity but covering long distances). To an intermediate extent, turbot sperm belongs to the sprint racer group. Then, the two different sperm movement strategies observed in the three species, are compensated by the behaviour of the breeders.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0175-8659 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 701  
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Auteur Moffitt, E.A.; Botsford, L.W.; Kaplan, D.; O'Farrell, M.R. url  openurl
  Titre Marine reserve networks for species that move within a home range Type Article scientifique
  Année 2009 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecological Applications  
  Volume 19 Numéro 7 Pages 1835-1847  
  Mots-Clés (up) adult movement; dispersal per recruit; fisheries; home range; marine; marine reserves; protected areas; spillover; sustainability; yield  
  Résumé Marine reserves are expected to benefit a wide range of species, but most models used to evaluate their effects assume that adults are sedentary, thereby potentially overestimating population persistence. Many nearshore marine organisms move within a home range as adults, and there is a need to understand the effects of this type of movement on reserve performance. We incorporated movement within a home range into a spatially explicit marine reserve model in order to assess the combined effects of adult and larval movement on persistence and yield in a general, strategic framework. We describe how the capacity of a population to persist decreased with increasing home range size in a manner that depended on whether the sedentary case was maintained by self persistence or network persistence. Self persistence declined gradually with increasing home range and larval dispersal distance, while network persistence decreased sharply to 0 above a threshold home range and was less dependent on larval dispersal distance. The maximum home range size protected by a reserve network increased with the fraction of coastline in reserves and decreasing exploitation rates outside reserves. Spillover due to movement within a home range contributed to yield moderately under certain conditions, although yield contributions were generally not as large as those from spillover due to larval dispersal. Our results indicate that, for species exhibiting home range behavior, persistence in a network of marine reserves may be more predictable than previously anticipated from models based solely on larval dispersal, in part due to better knowledge of home range sizes. Including movement within a home range can change persistence results significantly from those assuming that adults are sedentary; hence it is an important consideration in reserve design.  
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  ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 34  
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Auteur Pirog, A.; Jaquemet, S.; Blaison, A.; Soria, M.; Magalon, H. doi  openurl
  Titre Isolation and characterization of eight microsatellite loci from Galeocerdo cuvier (tiger shark) and cross-amplification in Carcharhinus leucas, Carcharhinus brevipinna, Carcharhinus plumbeus and Sphyrna lewini Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée PeerJ  
  Volume 4 Numéro Pages e2041  
  Mots-Clés (up) age; bull; Carcharhiniform; Control region; growth; hawaiian waters; markers; microsatellites; movements; patterns; Population Genetics; software; western north-atlantic  
  Résumé The tiger shark Galeocerdo cuvier (Carcharhinidae) is a large elasmobranch suspected to have, as other apex predators, a keystone function in marine ecosystems and is currently considered Near Threatened (Red list IUCN). Knowledge on its ecology, which is crucial to design proper conservation and management plans, is very scarce. Here we describe the isolation of eight polymorphic microsatellite loci using 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing of enriched DNA libraries. Their characteristics were tested on a population of tiger shark (n = 101) from Reunion Island (South-Western Indian Ocean). All loci were polymorphic with a number of alleles ranging from two to eight. No null alleles were detected and no linkage disequilibrium was detected after Bonferroni correction. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.03 to 0.76 and from 0.03 to 0.77, respectively. No locus deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and the global F-IS of the population was of 0.04(NS). Some of the eight loci developed here successfully cross-amplified in the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas (one locus), the spinner shark Carcharhinus brevi pi n n a (four loci), the sandbar shark Carcharhinus plumbeus (five loci) and the scalloped hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini (two loci). We also designed primers to amplify and sequence a mitochondrial marker, the control region. We sequenced 862 bp and found a low genetic diversity, with four polymorphic sites, a haplotype diversity of 0.15 and a nucleotide diversity of 2 x 10(-4).  
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  ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1651  
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Auteur Carpentier, A.S.; Berthe, C.; Ender, I.; Jaine, F.R.A.; Mourier, J.; Stevens, G.; De Rosemont, M.; Clua, E. doi  openurl
  Titre Preliminary insights into the population characteristics and distribution of reef (Mobula alfredi) and oceanic (M. birostris) manta rays in French Polynesia Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Coral Reefs  
  Volume 38 Numéro 6 Pages 1197-1210  
  Mots-Clés (up) aggregation; australia; bottle-nosed dolphins; california; Citizen science; conservation; Ecotourism management; habitat use; identification; marine park; movements; sharks; Site fidelity; Spatial connectivity; Sympatry  
  Résumé In French Polynesia, both currently recognized manta ray species, Mobula alfredi and M. birostris, are observed. Despite being an important cultural asset and generating significant economic benefits through manta ray watching tourism, published data on the ecology and threats to these species in the region are scarce. Based on an 18-year dataset of sighting records collected by citizen scientists and during two scientific expeditions, this study provides the first insights into the population characteristics and regional distribution of the two manta ray species in French Polynesia. A total of 1347 manta ray photographs (1337 for M. alfredi and 10 for M. birostris) were examined for the period January 2001-December 2017, with photo-identification techniques leading to the successful identification of 317 individual M. alfredi and 10 individual M. birostris throughout the Society, Tuamotu and Marquesas Islands. We provide the first confirmation of sympatric distribution of both species in the Society Islands. Our results highlight strong and long-term site fidelity of M. alfredi individuals to certain aggregation sites (> 9 years for 16 individuals) and reveal some degree of connectivity between populations, with 10 individuals recorded moving between islands located up to 50 km apart. Analysis of photographs of individuals bearing sub-lethal injuries (n = 68) suggests that M. alfredi are more likely to be injured at inhabited islands (Maupiti or Bora Bora; 75% of all injured individuals) than at uninhabited islands, with 75% of injuries related to boat propeller strikes and fishing gear entanglements. Our findings emphasize the need for further research to allow for a comprehensive evaluation of population structure, size and threats to manta rays in this region.  
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  ISSN 0722-4028 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes WOS:000496024100010 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2658  
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