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Auteur Lagabrielle, E.; Allibert, A.; Kiszka, J.J.; Loiseau, N.; Kilfoil, J.P.; Lemahieu, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Environmental and anthropogenic factors affecting the increasing occurrence of shark-human interactions around a fast-developing Indian Ocean island Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci Rep  
  Volume 8 Numéro (up) Pages 3676  
  Mots-Clés coral-reefs; south-africa; florida; western-australia; carcharhinus-leucas; movement patterns; attack; bull shark; la reunion; reunion-island  
  Résumé Understanding the environmental drivers of interactions between predators and humans is critical for public safety and management purposes. In the marine environment, this issue is exemplified by shark-human interactions. The annual shark bite incidence rate (SBIR) in La Reunion (Indian Ocean) is among the highest in the world (up to 1 event per 24,000 hours of surfing) and has experienced a 23-fold increase over the 2005-2016 period. Since 1988, 86% of shark bite events on ocean-users involved surfers off the leeward coast, where 96% of surfing activities took place. We modeled the SBIR as a function of environmental variables, including benthic substrate, sea temperature and period of day. The SBIR peaked in winter, during the afternoon and dramatically increased on coral substrate since the mid-2000s. Seasonal patterns of increasing SBIR followed similar fluctuations of large coastal shark occurrences (particularly the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas), consistent with the hypothesis that higher shark presence may result in an increasing likelihood of shark bite events. Potential contributing factors and adaptation of ocean-users to the increasing shark bite hazard are discussed. This interdisciplinary research contributes to a better understanding of shark-human interactions. The modeling method is relevant for wildlife hazard management in general.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2314  
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Auteur Boyd, C.; Punt, A.E.; Weimerskirch, H.; Bertrand, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Movement models provide insights into variation in the foraging effort of central place foragers Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecological Modelling  
  Volume 286 Numéro (up) Pages 13-25  
  Mots-Clés Animal movement; Foraging ecology; Hidden Markov model; Provisioning theory; Seabirds; Sula variegata  
  Résumé Ecology and conservation depend on an understanding of how animals adjust their behaviour patterns in response to changes in their environment. Central place foragers (CPFs) are well-suited for developing ecological models of adaptive processes because their objective functions and operational constraints can be reasonably inferred. Central place foraging and provisioning theory provide the theoretical framework for this analysis. Analysis of CPF time allocation and energy budgets can provide insights into their strategies for responding to environmental variation. However, until recently, suitable high-resolution data on the behaviour of seabirds and other CPFs at sea have not been available. Previous studies of breeding seabirds have investigated variation in foraging trip duration and colony attendance, but few studies have analyzed variation in time allocation within foraging trips. Here, we develop a conceptual energy-based model for analysing variation in the time allocation of CPFs during foraging trips, and apply it to the movement patterns of Peruvian boobies (Sula variegata). Foraging trips of Peruvian boobies, recorded using high-resolution global positioning systems (GPS), were first partitioned into movement modes consistent with travel and foraging behaviours using a hidden Markov model (HMM) adapted to account for gaps in the GPS tracks associated with diving behaviour. Analysis of the HMM results based on the conceptual model indicated that differences in foraging effort between two treatments were best explained by a combination of differences in travel time and in time spent searching for prey. The conceptual model provides the basis for an integrated approach to analysis of variation in foraging strategies in which identification of various behaviours is coupled with assessments of time and energy budgets. This integrated approach can contribute to greater understanding of the processes determining foraging strategies and the limits to these strategies in the context of competition for resources and global climate change.  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3800 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 355  
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Auteur Pirog, A.; Jaquemet, S.; Blaison, A.; Soria, M.; Magalon, H. doi  openurl
  Titre Isolation and characterization of eight microsatellite loci from Galeocerdo cuvier (tiger shark) and cross-amplification in Carcharhinus leucas, Carcharhinus brevipinna, Carcharhinus plumbeus and Sphyrna lewini Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée PeerJ  
  Volume 4 Numéro (up) Pages e2041  
  Mots-Clés age; bull; Carcharhiniform; Control region; growth; hawaiian waters; markers; microsatellites; movements; patterns; Population Genetics; software; western north-atlantic  
  Résumé The tiger shark Galeocerdo cuvier (Carcharhinidae) is a large elasmobranch suspected to have, as other apex predators, a keystone function in marine ecosystems and is currently considered Near Threatened (Red list IUCN). Knowledge on its ecology, which is crucial to design proper conservation and management plans, is very scarce. Here we describe the isolation of eight polymorphic microsatellite loci using 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing of enriched DNA libraries. Their characteristics were tested on a population of tiger shark (n = 101) from Reunion Island (South-Western Indian Ocean). All loci were polymorphic with a number of alleles ranging from two to eight. No null alleles were detected and no linkage disequilibrium was detected after Bonferroni correction. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.03 to 0.76 and from 0.03 to 0.77, respectively. No locus deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and the global F-IS of the population was of 0.04(NS). Some of the eight loci developed here successfully cross-amplified in the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas (one locus), the spinner shark Carcharhinus brevi pi n n a (four loci), the sandbar shark Carcharhinus plumbeus (five loci) and the scalloped hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini (two loci). We also designed primers to amplify and sequence a mitochondrial marker, the control region. We sequenced 862 bp and found a low genetic diversity, with four polymorphic sites, a haplotype diversity of 0.15 and a nucleotide diversity of 2 x 10(-4).  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1651  
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Auteur Sirot, C.; Gronkjaer, P.; Pedersen, J.B.; Panfili, J.; Zetina-Rejon, M.; Tripp-Valdez, A.; Ramos-Miranda, J.; Flores-Hernandez, D.; Sosa-Lopez, A.; Darnaude, A.M. doi  openurl
  Titre Using otolith organic matter to detect diet shifts in Bardiella chrysoura, during a period of environmental changes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.  
  Volume 575 Numéro (up) Pages 137-152  
  Mots-Clés aquatic ecosystems; Bairdiella chrysoura; climate-change; Coastal ecosystem; fish otoliths; food-web; movement patterns; prey availability; Stable isotope analysis; stable-isotope analysis; survival; temporal-changes; terminos lagoon; Trophic ecology; Trophic interactions  
  Résumé Accurate knowledge on fish trophic ecology and its modifications is crucial for understanding the impact of global change on ecosystems. In this context, we investigated the value of the delta C-13 and delta N-15 of otolith soluble organic matter (SOM) for identifying temporal diet shifts in American silver perch Bairdiella chrysoura over a 30-yr period characterized by strong changes in its population size and habitats within the Terminos Lagoon (Mexico). We first compared the otolith SOM isotopic signatures from present-clay adults to those of muscle and the main local prey. Our results suggest that otolith SOM can be confidently extracted and analyzed for both present and past otoliths of this species. The mean otolith SOM signatures obtained (-15.92 +/- 1.35%, for delta C-13 and 9.38 +/- 0.93%, for delta N-15) were consistent with those of the diet as 85% of the individual signatures were included within the prey isotopic niche area. Moreover, this study supports a trophic enrichment factor between diet and otolith (TEFdiet-otolith) close to 0 for delta N-15, while for delta C-13, the TEFololith-muscle of +0.02% warrants further investigation. Then, we compared past and contemporary otolith SOM signatures to investigate temporal diet shifts in B. chrysoura. This showed that 613C and delta N-15 differed significantly between the past and present period even if the temporal shift remained relatively small (respectively +1.17%, and 0.55%). The present study substantiates the use of otolith SOM delta C-13 and delta N-15 as a proxy of fish present and past trophic position, opening the possibility for major progress in studies of temporal changes in food web ecology.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2172  
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Auteur Gruss, A.; Kaplan, D.; Guenette, S.; Roberts, C.M.; Botsford, L.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Consequences of adult and juvenile movement for marine protected areas Type Article scientifique
  Année 2011 Publication Revue Abrégée Biological Conservation  
  Volume 144 Numéro (up) Pages 692-702  
  Mots-Clés areas; Density-dependent; Density-independent; Dynamic; marine; movement; (MPAs); MPAs; protected; Spillover; Targeted  
  Résumé Adult and juvenile mobility has a considerable influence on the functioning of marine protected areas. It is recognized that adult and juvenile movement reduces the core benefits of protected areas, namely protecting the full age-structure of marine populations, while at the same time perhaps improving fisheries yield over the no-reserve situation through export of individuals from protected areas. Nevertheless, the study of the consequences of movement on protected area functioning is unbalanced. Significant attention has been paid to the influence of certain movement patterns, such as diffusive movement and home ranges, while the impacts of others, such as density-dependent movements and ontogenetic migrations, have been relatively ignored. Here we review the diversity of density-independent and density-dependent movement patterns, as well as what is currently known about their consequences for the conservation and fisheries effects of marine protected areas. We highlight a number of 'partially addressed' issues in marine protected area research, such as the effects of reserves targeting specific life phases, and a number of essentially unstudied issues, such as density-dependent movements, nomadism, ontogenetic migrations, behavioral polymorphism and 'dynamic' reserves that adjust location as a realtime response to habitat changes. Assessing these issues will be essential to creating effective marine protected area networks for mobile species and accurately assessing reserve impacts on these species.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 141  
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