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Auteur Moffitt, E.A.; Botsford, L.W.; Kaplan, D.; O'Farrell, M.R. url  openurl
  Titre Marine reserve networks for species that move within a home range Type Article scientifique
  Année 2009 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecological Applications  
  Volume 19 Numéro 7 Pages 1835-1847  
  Mots-Clés adult movement; dispersal per recruit; fisheries; home range; marine; marine reserves; protected areas; spillover; sustainability; yield  
  Résumé Marine reserves are expected to benefit a wide range of species, but most models used to evaluate their effects assume that adults are sedentary, thereby potentially overestimating population persistence. Many nearshore marine organisms move within a home range as adults, and there is a need to understand the effects of this type of movement on reserve performance. We incorporated movement within a home range into a spatially explicit marine reserve model in order to assess the combined effects of adult and larval movement on persistence and yield in a general, strategic framework. We describe how the capacity of a population to persist decreased with increasing home range size in a manner that depended on whether the sedentary case was maintained by self persistence or network persistence. Self persistence declined gradually with increasing home range and larval dispersal distance, while network persistence decreased sharply to 0 above a threshold home range and was less dependent on larval dispersal distance. The maximum home range size protected by a reserve network increased with the fraction of coastline in reserves and decreasing exploitation rates outside reserves. Spillover due to movement within a home range contributed to yield moderately under certain conditions, although yield contributions were generally not as large as those from spillover due to larval dispersal. Our results indicate that, for species exhibiting home range behavior, persistence in a network of marine reserves may be more predictable than previously anticipated from models based solely on larval dispersal, in part due to better knowledge of home range sizes. Including movement within a home range can change persistence results significantly from those assuming that adults are sedentary; hence it is an important consideration in reserve design.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN (up) 1051-0761 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 34  
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Auteur Husson, B.; Certain, G.; Filin, A.; Planque, B. doi  openurl
  Titre Suitable habitats of fish species in the Barents Sea Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Fish Oceanogr.  
  Volume 29 Numéro 6 Pages 526-540  
  Mots-Clés climate change; climate-change; demersal fish; distribution models; distributions; ecology; environmental gradients; environmental niche; generalized additive models; habitat suitability models; limiting factors; marine fish; movement; quantile regression; spatial-distribution; species distribution  
  Résumé Many marine species exhibit poleward migrations following climate change. The Barents Sea, a doorstep to the fast-warming Arctic, is experiencing large scale changes in its environment and its communities. Tracking and anticipating changes for management and conservation purposes at the scale of the ecosystem necessitate quantitative knowledge on individual species distribution drivers. This paper aims at identifying the factors controlling demersal habitats in the Barents Sea, investigating for which species we can predict current and future habitats and inferring those most likely to respond to climate change. We used non-linear quantile regressions (QGAM) to model the upper quantile of the biomass response of 33 fish species to 10 environmental gradients and revealed three environmental niche typologies. Four main predictors seem to be limiting species habitat: bottom and surface temperature, salinity, and depth. We highlighted three cases of present and future habitat predictability: (a) Habitats of widespread species are not likely to be limited by the existing conditions within the Barents Sea. (b) Habitats limited by a single factor are predictable and could shift if impacted by climate change. If the factor is depth, the habitat may stagnate or shrink if the environment becomes unsuitable. (c) Habitats limited by several factors are also predictable but need to be predicted from QGAM applied on projected environmental maps. These modeled suitable habitats can serve as input to species distribution forecasts and end-to-end models, and inform fisheries and conservation management.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN (up) 1054-6006 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000562423700001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2867  
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Auteur Courbin, N.; Besnard, A.; Peron, C.; Saraux, C.; Fort, J.; Perret, S.; Tornos, J.; Gremillet, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Short-term prey field lability constrains individual specialisation in resource selection and foraging site fidelity in a marine predator Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Lett.  
  Volume 21 Numéro 7 Pages 1043-1054  
  Mots-Clés behavior; Behavioural consistency; Calonectris diomedea; diet; ecology; foraging site fidelity; gannets; habitat selection; mediterranean sea; models; movement; resource selection; Scopoli's shearwater; seabirds; strategies; temporal resource dynamic; Western Mediterranean  
  Résumé Spatio-temporally stable prey distributions coupled with individual foraging site fidelity are predicted to favour individual resource specialisation. Conversely, predators coping with dynamic prey distributions should diversify their individual diet and/or shift foraging areas to increase net intake. We studied individual specialisation in Scopoli's shearwaters (Calonectris diomedea) from the highly dynamic Western Mediterranean, using daily prey distributions together with resource selection, site fidelity and trophic-level analyses. As hypothesised, we found dietary diversification, low foraging site fidelity and almost no individual specialisation in resource selection. Crucially, shearwaters switched daily foraging tactics, selecting areas with contrasting prey of varying trophic levels. Overall, information use and plastic resource selection of individuals with reduced short-term foraging site fidelity allow predators to overcome prey field lability. Our study is an essential step towards a better understanding of individual responses to enhanced environmental stochasticity driven by global changes, and of pathways favouring population persistence.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN (up) 1461-023x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2380  
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Auteur Lagabrielle, E.; Allibert, A.; Kiszka, J.J.; Loiseau, N.; Kilfoil, J.P.; Lemahieu, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Environmental and anthropogenic factors affecting the increasing occurrence of shark-human interactions around a fast-developing Indian Ocean island Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci Rep  
  Volume 8 Numéro Pages 3676  
  Mots-Clés coral-reefs; south-africa; florida; western-australia; carcharhinus-leucas; movement patterns; attack; bull shark; la reunion; reunion-island  
  Résumé Understanding the environmental drivers of interactions between predators and humans is critical for public safety and management purposes. In the marine environment, this issue is exemplified by shark-human interactions. The annual shark bite incidence rate (SBIR) in La Reunion (Indian Ocean) is among the highest in the world (up to 1 event per 24,000 hours of surfing) and has experienced a 23-fold increase over the 2005-2016 period. Since 1988, 86% of shark bite events on ocean-users involved surfers off the leeward coast, where 96% of surfing activities took place. We modeled the SBIR as a function of environmental variables, including benthic substrate, sea temperature and period of day. The SBIR peaked in winter, during the afternoon and dramatically increased on coral substrate since the mid-2000s. Seasonal patterns of increasing SBIR followed similar fluctuations of large coastal shark occurrences (particularly the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas), consistent with the hypothesis that higher shark presence may result in an increasing likelihood of shark bite events. Potential contributing factors and adaptation of ocean-users to the increasing shark bite hazard are discussed. This interdisciplinary research contributes to a better understanding of shark-human interactions. The modeling method is relevant for wildlife hazard management in general.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN (up) 2045-2322 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2314  
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Auteur Dalleau, M.; Kramer-Schadt, S.; Gangat, Y.; Bourjea, J.; Lajoie, G.; Grimm, V. doi  openurl
  Titre Modeling the emergence of migratory corridors and foraging hot spots of the green sea turtle Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Evol.  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés aldabra atoll; chelonia-mydas; connectivity; corridors; individual-based model; leatherback turtles; marine turtles; migration; movement; penghu archipelago; population-dynamics; remigration intervals; satellite-tracking; sea turtle; wan-an island  
  Résumé Environmental factors shape the spatial distribution and dynamics of populations. Understanding how these factors interact with movement behavior is critical for efficient conservation, in particular for migratory species. Adult female green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, migrate between foraging and nesting sites that are generally separated by thousands of kilometers. As an emblematic endangered species, green turtles have been intensively studied, with a focus on nesting, migration, and foraging. Nevertheless, few attempts integrated these behaviors and their trade-offs by considering the spatial configurations of foraging and nesting grounds as well as environmental heterogeneity like oceanic currents and food distribution. We developed an individual-based model to investigate the impact of local environmental conditions on emerging migratory corridors and reproductive output and to thereby identify conservation priority sites. The model integrates movement, nesting, and foraging behavior. Despite being largely conceptual, the model captured realistic movement patterns which confirm field studies. The spatial distribution of migratory corridors and foraging hot spots was mostly constrained by features of the regional landscape, such as nesting site locations, distribution of feeding patches, and oceanic currents. These constraints also explained the mixing patterns in regional forager communities. By implementing alternative decision strategies of the turtles, we found that foraging site fidelity and nesting investment, two characteristics of green turtles' biology, are favorable strategies under unpredictable environmental conditions affecting their habitats. Based on our results, we propose specific guidelines for the regional conservation of green turtles as well as future research suggestions advancing spatial ecology of sea turtles. Being implemented in an easy to learn open-source software, our model can coevolve with the collection and analysis of new data on energy budget and movement into a generic tool for sea turtle research and conservation. Our modeling approach could also be useful for supporting the conservation of other migratory marine animals.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN (up) 2045-7758 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000481747800001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2621  
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