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Auteur Sirot, C.; Gronkjaer, P.; Pedersen, J.B.; Panfili, J.; Zetina-Rejon, M.; Tripp-Valdez, A.; Ramos-Miranda, J.; Flores-Hernandez, D.; Sosa-Lopez, A.; Darnaude, A.M. doi  openurl
  Titre Using otolith organic matter to detect diet shifts in Bardiella chrysoura, during a period of environmental changes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.  
  Volume 575 Numéro Pages (down) 137-152  
  Mots-Clés aquatic ecosystems; Bairdiella chrysoura; climate-change; Coastal ecosystem; fish otoliths; food-web; movement patterns; prey availability; Stable isotope analysis; stable-isotope analysis; survival; temporal-changes; terminos lagoon; Trophic ecology; Trophic interactions  
  Résumé Accurate knowledge on fish trophic ecology and its modifications is crucial for understanding the impact of global change on ecosystems. In this context, we investigated the value of the delta C-13 and delta N-15 of otolith soluble organic matter (SOM) for identifying temporal diet shifts in American silver perch Bairdiella chrysoura over a 30-yr period characterized by strong changes in its population size and habitats within the Terminos Lagoon (Mexico). We first compared the otolith SOM isotopic signatures from present-clay adults to those of muscle and the main local prey. Our results suggest that otolith SOM can be confidently extracted and analyzed for both present and past otoliths of this species. The mean otolith SOM signatures obtained (-15.92 +/- 1.35%, for delta C-13 and 9.38 +/- 0.93%, for delta N-15) were consistent with those of the diet as 85% of the individual signatures were included within the prey isotopic niche area. Moreover, this study supports a trophic enrichment factor between diet and otolith (TEFdiet-otolith) close to 0 for delta N-15, while for delta C-13, the TEFololith-muscle of +0.02% warrants further investigation. Then, we compared past and contemporary otolith SOM signatures to investigate temporal diet shifts in B. chrysoura. This showed that 613C and delta N-15 differed significantly between the past and present period even if the temporal shift remained relatively small (respectively +1.17%, and 0.55%). The present study substantiates the use of otolith SOM delta C-13 and delta N-15 as a proxy of fish present and past trophic position, opening the possibility for major progress in studies of temporal changes in food web ecology.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2172  
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Auteur Sardenne, F.; Diaha, N.'G.C.; Amande, M.J.; Zudaire, I.; Couturier, L.I.E.; Metral, L.; Le Grand, F.; Bodin, N. doi  openurl
  Titre Seasonal habitat and length influence on the trophic niche of co-occurring tropical tunas in the eastern Atlantic Ocean Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci.  
  Volume 76 Numéro 1 Pages (down) 69-80  
  Mots-Clés lipids; top predators; pacific-ocean; thunnus-albacares; stable-isotope analyses; western; vertical movements; bigeye tuna; vinciguerria-nimbaria; yellowfin tuna  
  Résumé In the Gulf of Guinea, bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus; BET) and yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares; YFT) are an important part of commercial fisheries and play a prominent ecological role as top predators. Using fatty acid profiles and carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes, we examined their trophic niche partitioning in this understudied region. Trophic niche overlap was high (> 70%), similar to percentages in other ocean basins. BET occupied a higher trophic position than YFT and fed on deeper prey (high delta N-15 values and high proportions of monounsaturated fatty acids). The trophic position of YFT decreased slightly in the last 15 years (delta N-15 values decreased by similar to 0.5 parts per thousand), suggesting a change in epipelagic communities, as observed in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Ontogenic changes were limited to BET. For both species, the dietary proportion of the diatom marker 20:5(n-3) increased in the seasonal upwelling area, highlighting the influence of seasonal habitat on the diet of tuna. The relatively lipid-rich muscle (similar to 6% dry mass) of Atlantic tropical tuna suggests a richer diet in this region than that of Indian Ocean tropical tuna and (or) differences in energy allocation strategies.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0706-652x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2483  
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Auteur Thorne, L.H.; Hazen, E.L.; Bograd, S.J.; Foley, D.G.; Conners, M.G.; Kappes, M.A.; Kim, H.M.; Costa, D.P.; Tremblay, Y.; Shaffer, S.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Foraging behavior links climate variability and reproduction in North Pacific albatrosses Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Movement Ecology  
  Volume 3 Numéro 1 Pages (down) 27  
  Mots-Clés Albatross; Climate; Environmental variability; Movement; Reproductive success  
  Résumé Climate-driven environmental change in the North Pacific has been well documented, with marked effects on the habitat and foraging behavior of marine predators. However, the mechanistic linkages connecting climate-driven changes in behavior to predator populations are not well understood. We evaluated the effects of climate-driven environmental variability on the reproductive success and foraging behavior of Laysan and Black-footed albatrosses breeding in the Northwest Hawaiian Islands during both brooding and incubating periods. We assessed foraging trip metrics and reproductive success using data collected from 2002–2012 and 1981–2012, respectively, relative to variability in the location of the Transition Zone Chlorophyll Front (TZCF, an important foraging region for albatrosses), sea surface temperature (SST), Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI), and the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation index (NPGO).  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2051-3933 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1462  
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Auteur Boyd, C.; Punt, A.E.; Weimerskirch, H.; Bertrand, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Movement models provide insights into variation in the foraging effort of central place foragers Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecological Modelling  
  Volume 286 Numéro Pages (down) 13-25  
  Mots-Clés Animal movement; Foraging ecology; Hidden Markov model; Provisioning theory; Seabirds; Sula variegata  
  Résumé Ecology and conservation depend on an understanding of how animals adjust their behaviour patterns in response to changes in their environment. Central place foragers (CPFs) are well-suited for developing ecological models of adaptive processes because their objective functions and operational constraints can be reasonably inferred. Central place foraging and provisioning theory provide the theoretical framework for this analysis. Analysis of CPF time allocation and energy budgets can provide insights into their strategies for responding to environmental variation. However, until recently, suitable high-resolution data on the behaviour of seabirds and other CPFs at sea have not been available. Previous studies of breeding seabirds have investigated variation in foraging trip duration and colony attendance, but few studies have analyzed variation in time allocation within foraging trips. Here, we develop a conceptual energy-based model for analysing variation in the time allocation of CPFs during foraging trips, and apply it to the movement patterns of Peruvian boobies (Sula variegata). Foraging trips of Peruvian boobies, recorded using high-resolution global positioning systems (GPS), were first partitioned into movement modes consistent with travel and foraging behaviours using a hidden Markov model (HMM) adapted to account for gaps in the GPS tracks associated with diving behaviour. Analysis of the HMM results based on the conceptual model indicated that differences in foraging effort between two treatments were best explained by a combination of differences in travel time and in time spent searching for prey. The conceptual model provides the basis for an integrated approach to analysis of variation in foraging strategies in which identification of various behaviours is coupled with assessments of time and energy budgets. This integrated approach can contribute to greater understanding of the processes determining foraging strategies and the limits to these strategies in the context of competition for resources and global climate change.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3800 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 355  
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Auteur Bouyoucos, I.A.; Romaine, M.; Azoulai, L.; Eustache, K.; Mourier, J.; Rummer, J.L.; Planes, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Home range of newborn blacktip reef sharks (Carcharhinus melanopterus), as estimated using mark-recapture and acoustic telemetry Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Coral Reefs  
  Volume Numéro Pages (down)  
  Mots-Clés Elasmobranch; French Polynesia; habitat use; Kernel utilization density; Marine protected area; Minimum convex polygon; movements; Shark nursery area; space  
  Résumé Sharks play important functional roles in coral reef ecosystems. Studying reef shark populations' spatial ecology also contributes important data for effective conservation planning. The purpose of this study was to define the home range of neonatal blacktip reef sharks (Carcharhinus melanopterus) around Moorea, French Polynesia, and compare estimates using both mark-recapture surveys and active acoustic telemetry. Mark-recapture surveys produced a minimum convex polygon (MCP) of 0.07 km(2) that was significantly larger than the MCP derived from acoustic telemetry (0.02 km(2)). Acoustic telemetry produced 50 and 95% kernel utilization densities that were smaller (0.02 km(2)) and larger (0.14 km(2)) than home range estimates from mark-recapture surveys, respectively. Home range estimates from this study are the smallest that have been documented for neonatal blacktip reef sharks, possibly owing to the study sites' proximity to deep channels. Mark-recapture and active acoustic telemetry are complementary approaches worthy of consideration where passive telemetry is impractical.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0722-4028 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000538953900001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2818  
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