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Auteur Thiebault, A.; Tremblay, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Splitting animal trajectories into fine-scale behaviorally consistent movement units: breaking points relate to external stimuli in a foraging seabird Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Behav Ecol Sociobiol  
  Volume 67 Numéro 6 Pages 1013-1026  
  Mots-Clés Animal behavior; Biologging; Gps; Movement ecology; Segmentation  
  Résumé  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel (up) LL @ pixluser @ collection 263  
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Auteur Moffitt, E.A.; Botsford, L.W.; Kaplan, D.; O'Farrell, M.R. url  openurl
  Titre Marine reserve networks for species that move within a home range Type Article scientifique
  Année 2009 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecological Applications  
  Volume 19 Numéro 7 Pages 1835-1847  
  Mots-Clés adult movement; dispersal per recruit; fisheries; home range; marine; marine reserves; protected areas; spillover; sustainability; yield  
  Résumé Marine reserves are expected to benefit a wide range of species, but most models used to evaluate their effects assume that adults are sedentary, thereby potentially overestimating population persistence. Many nearshore marine organisms move within a home range as adults, and there is a need to understand the effects of this type of movement on reserve performance. We incorporated movement within a home range into a spatially explicit marine reserve model in order to assess the combined effects of adult and larval movement on persistence and yield in a general, strategic framework. We describe how the capacity of a population to persist decreased with increasing home range size in a manner that depended on whether the sedentary case was maintained by self persistence or network persistence. Self persistence declined gradually with increasing home range and larval dispersal distance, while network persistence decreased sharply to 0 above a threshold home range and was less dependent on larval dispersal distance. The maximum home range size protected by a reserve network increased with the fraction of coastline in reserves and decreasing exploitation rates outside reserves. Spillover due to movement within a home range contributed to yield moderately under certain conditions, although yield contributions were generally not as large as those from spillover due to larval dispersal. Our results indicate that, for species exhibiting home range behavior, persistence in a network of marine reserves may be more predictable than previously anticipated from models based solely on larval dispersal, in part due to better knowledge of home range sizes. Including movement within a home range can change persistence results significantly from those assuming that adults are sedentary; hence it is an important consideration in reserve design.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
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  ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel (up) LL @ pixluser @ collection 34  
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Auteur Fablet, R.; Chaigneau, A.; Bertrand, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Multiscale analysis of geometric planar deformations : application to wild animal electronic tracking and satellite ocean observation data Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ieee Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing  
  Volume 52 Numéro 6 Pages 3627-3636  
  Mots-Clés Animal movements; geophysical fields; multiscale geometry; planar curve; trajectory analysis; wavelet analysis  
  Résumé The development of animal tracking technologies (including GPS and ARGOS satellite systems) and the increasing resolution of remote-sensing observations call for tools extracting and describing the geometric patterns along a track or within an image over a wide range of spatial scales. Whereas shape analysis has largely been addressed over the last decades, the multiscale analysis of the geometry of opened planar curves has received little attention. We here show that classical multiscale techniques cannot properly address this issue and propose an original wavelet-based scheme. To highlight the generic nature of our multiscale wavelet technique, we report applications to two different observation data sets, namely, wild animal movement paths recorded by electronic tags and satellite observations of sea-surface geophysical fields.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0196-2892 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel (up) LL @ pixluser @ collection 328  
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Auteur Boyd, C.; Punt, A.E.; Weimerskirch, H.; Bertrand, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Movement models provide insights into variation in the foraging effort of central place foragers Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecological Modelling  
  Volume 286 Numéro Pages 13-25  
  Mots-Clés Animal movement; Foraging ecology; Hidden Markov model; Provisioning theory; Seabirds; Sula variegata  
  Résumé Ecology and conservation depend on an understanding of how animals adjust their behaviour patterns in response to changes in their environment. Central place foragers (CPFs) are well-suited for developing ecological models of adaptive processes because their objective functions and operational constraints can be reasonably inferred. Central place foraging and provisioning theory provide the theoretical framework for this analysis. Analysis of CPF time allocation and energy budgets can provide insights into their strategies for responding to environmental variation. However, until recently, suitable high-resolution data on the behaviour of seabirds and other CPFs at sea have not been available. Previous studies of breeding seabirds have investigated variation in foraging trip duration and colony attendance, but few studies have analyzed variation in time allocation within foraging trips. Here, we develop a conceptual energy-based model for analysing variation in the time allocation of CPFs during foraging trips, and apply it to the movement patterns of Peruvian boobies (Sula variegata). Foraging trips of Peruvian boobies, recorded using high-resolution global positioning systems (GPS), were first partitioned into movement modes consistent with travel and foraging behaviours using a hidden Markov model (HMM) adapted to account for gaps in the GPS tracks associated with diving behaviour. Analysis of the HMM results based on the conceptual model indicated that differences in foraging effort between two treatments were best explained by a combination of differences in travel time and in time spent searching for prey. The conceptual model provides the basis for an integrated approach to analysis of variation in foraging strategies in which identification of various behaviours is coupled with assessments of time and energy budgets. This integrated approach can contribute to greater understanding of the processes determining foraging strategies and the limits to these strategies in the context of competition for resources and global climate change.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3800 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel (up) LL @ pixluser @ collection 355  
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Auteur Gruss, A.; Kaplan, D.; Guenette, S.; Roberts, C.M.; Botsford, L.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Consequences of adult and juvenile movement for marine protected areas Type Article scientifique
  Année 2011 Publication Revue Abrégée Biological Conservation  
  Volume 144 Numéro Pages 692-702  
  Mots-Clés areas; Density-dependent; Density-independent; Dynamic; marine; movement; (MPAs); MPAs; protected; Spillover; Targeted  
  Résumé Adult and juvenile mobility has a considerable influence on the functioning of marine protected areas. It is recognized that adult and juvenile movement reduces the core benefits of protected areas, namely protecting the full age-structure of marine populations, while at the same time perhaps improving fisheries yield over the no-reserve situation through export of individuals from protected areas. Nevertheless, the study of the consequences of movement on protected area functioning is unbalanced. Significant attention has been paid to the influence of certain movement patterns, such as diffusive movement and home ranges, while the impacts of others, such as density-dependent movements and ontogenetic migrations, have been relatively ignored. Here we review the diversity of density-independent and density-dependent movement patterns, as well as what is currently known about their consequences for the conservation and fisheries effects of marine protected areas. We highlight a number of 'partially addressed' issues in marine protected area research, such as the effects of reserves targeting specific life phases, and a number of essentially unstudied issues, such as density-dependent movements, nomadism, ontogenetic migrations, behavioral polymorphism and 'dynamic' reserves that adjust location as a realtime response to habitat changes. Assessing these issues will be essential to creating effective marine protected area networks for mobile species and accurately assessing reserve impacts on these species.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel (up) LL @ pixluser @ collection 141  
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