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Auteur (up) Cruaud, P.; Decker, C.; Olu, K.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Papot, C.; Le Baut, J.; Vigneron, A.; Khripounoff, A.; Gayet, N.; Cathalot, C.; Caprais, J.-C.; Pignet, P.; Godfroy, A.; Cambon-Bonavita, M.-A. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecophysiological differences between vesicomyid species and metabolic capabilities of their symbionts influence distribution patterns of the deep-sea clams Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Evol. Persp.  
  Volume 40 Numéro 3 Pages e12541  
  Mots-Clés calyptogena-magnifica; chemoautotrophic bacteria; cold seeps; community structure; deep-sea ecosystems; evolutionary relationships; guaymas basin; Guaymas Basin; gulf-of-california; hydrothermal vent clam; macrofaunal communities; marine ecology; pliocardinae bivalve; sulfide-rich sediments; sulfur storage; vesicomyid movements  
  Résumé This study provides an analysis of vesicomyid bivalve-symbiont community distribution across cold seep and hydrothermal vent areas in the Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California, Mexico). Using a combination of morphological and molecular approaches including fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and electronic microscopy observations, vesicomyid clam species and their associated symbionts were characterized and results were analyzed in light of geochemical conditions and other on-site observations. A greater diversity of vesicomyids was found at cold seep areas, where three different species were present (Phreagena soyoae [syn. kilmeri], Archivesica gigas, and Calyptogena pacifica). In contrast, A. gigas was the only species sampled across the hydrothermal vent area. The same haplotype of A. gigas was found in both hydrothermal vent and cold seep areas, highlighting possible contemporary exchanges among neighboring vents and seeps. In either ecosystem, molecular characterization of the symbionts confirmed the specificity between symbionts and hosts and supported the hypothesis of a predominantly vertical transmission. In addition, patterns of clams could reflect potential niche preferences for each species. The occurrence of numerous traces of vesicomyid movements on sediments in the sites colonized by A. gigas seemed to indicate that this species might have a better ability to move. Furthermore, variation in gill sulfur content could reveal a higher plasticity and sulfur storage capacity in A. gigas. Thus, the distribution of vesicomyid species across the chemosynthetic areas of the Guaymas Basin could be explained by differences in biological traits of the vesicomyid species that would allow A. gigas to more easily exploit transient and punctual sources of available sulfide than P. soyoae.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0173-9565 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000472949800006 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2605  
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Auteur (up) Dalleau, M.; Kramer-Schadt, S.; Gangat, Y.; Bourjea, J.; Lajoie, G.; Grimm, V. doi  openurl
  Titre Modeling the emergence of migratory corridors and foraging hot spots of the green sea turtle Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Evol.  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés aldabra atoll; chelonia-mydas; connectivity; corridors; individual-based model; leatherback turtles; marine turtles; migration; movement; penghu archipelago; population-dynamics; remigration intervals; satellite-tracking; sea turtle; wan-an island  
  Résumé Environmental factors shape the spatial distribution and dynamics of populations. Understanding how these factors interact with movement behavior is critical for efficient conservation, in particular for migratory species. Adult female green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, migrate between foraging and nesting sites that are generally separated by thousands of kilometers. As an emblematic endangered species, green turtles have been intensively studied, with a focus on nesting, migration, and foraging. Nevertheless, few attempts integrated these behaviors and their trade-offs by considering the spatial configurations of foraging and nesting grounds as well as environmental heterogeneity like oceanic currents and food distribution. We developed an individual-based model to investigate the impact of local environmental conditions on emerging migratory corridors and reproductive output and to thereby identify conservation priority sites. The model integrates movement, nesting, and foraging behavior. Despite being largely conceptual, the model captured realistic movement patterns which confirm field studies. The spatial distribution of migratory corridors and foraging hot spots was mostly constrained by features of the regional landscape, such as nesting site locations, distribution of feeding patches, and oceanic currents. These constraints also explained the mixing patterns in regional forager communities. By implementing alternative decision strategies of the turtles, we found that foraging site fidelity and nesting investment, two characteristics of green turtles' biology, are favorable strategies under unpredictable environmental conditions affecting their habitats. Based on our results, we propose specific guidelines for the regional conservation of green turtles as well as future research suggestions advancing spatial ecology of sea turtles. Being implemented in an easy to learn open-source software, our model can coevolve with the collection and analysis of new data on energy budget and movement into a generic tool for sea turtle research and conservation. Our modeling approach could also be useful for supporting the conservation of other migratory marine animals.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000481747800001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2621  
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Auteur (up) Drouineau, H.; Lobry, J.; Bez, N.; Travers-Trolet, M.; Vermard, Y.; Gascuel, D. doi  openurl
  Titre The need for a protean fisheries science to address the degradation of exploited aquatic ecosystems Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquat. Living Resour.  
  Volume 29 Numéro 2 Pages Unsp-E201  
  Mots-Clés climate-change; eafm; Ecology; Fisheries management; fisheries science; individual-based model; Management strategy evaluation; marine ecosystems; marine resources; models; Movement; ocean; Sustainability; uncertainty; vms data  
  Résumé In this introductory paper we highlight key questions that were discussed during the symposium on “Status, functioning and shifts in marine ecosystems” organized by the Association Francaise d'Halieutique (French Association for Fisheries Sciences, Montpellier, France, July 2015). This symposium illustrated that fisheries science is now working at multiple scales and on all dimensions of socio-ecosystems (ecological, political, sociological, and economic), with a great diversity of approaches and taking into account different levels of complexity while acknowledging diverse sources of uncertainty. We argue that we should go one step further and call for a protean fisheries science to address the deteriorated states of aquatic ecosystems caused by anthropogenic pressures. Protean science is constantly evolving to meet emerging issues, while improving its coherence and integration capacity in its complexity. This science must be nourished by multiple approaches and be capable of addressing all organizational scales, from individual fish or fishermen up to the entire ecosystem, include society, its economy and the services it derives from aquatic systems. Such a protean science is required to address the complexity of ecosystem functioning and of the impacts of anthropogenic pressures.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0990-7440 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2066  
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Auteur (up) Fablet, R.; Chaigneau, A.; Bertrand, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Multiscale analysis of geometric planar deformations : application to wild animal electronic tracking and satellite ocean observation data Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ieee Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing  
  Volume 52 Numéro 6 Pages 3627-3636  
  Mots-Clés Animal movements; geophysical fields; multiscale geometry; planar curve; trajectory analysis; wavelet analysis  
  Résumé The development of animal tracking technologies (including GPS and ARGOS satellite systems) and the increasing resolution of remote-sensing observations call for tools extracting and describing the geometric patterns along a track or within an image over a wide range of spatial scales. Whereas shape analysis has largely been addressed over the last decades, the multiscale analysis of the geometry of opened planar curves has received little attention. We here show that classical multiscale techniques cannot properly address this issue and propose an original wavelet-based scheme. To highlight the generic nature of our multiscale wavelet technique, we report applications to two different observation data sets, namely, wild animal movement paths recorded by electronic tags and satellite observations of sea-surface geophysical fields.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0196-2892 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 328  
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Auteur (up) Gruss, A.; Kaplan, D.; Guenette, S.; Roberts, C.M.; Botsford, L.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Consequences of adult and juvenile movement for marine protected areas Type Article scientifique
  Année 2011 Publication Revue Abrégée Biological Conservation  
  Volume 144 Numéro Pages 692-702  
  Mots-Clés areas; Density-dependent; Density-independent; Dynamic; marine; movement; (MPAs); MPAs; protected; Spillover; Targeted  
  Résumé Adult and juvenile mobility has a considerable influence on the functioning of marine protected areas. It is recognized that adult and juvenile movement reduces the core benefits of protected areas, namely protecting the full age-structure of marine populations, while at the same time perhaps improving fisheries yield over the no-reserve situation through export of individuals from protected areas. Nevertheless, the study of the consequences of movement on protected area functioning is unbalanced. Significant attention has been paid to the influence of certain movement patterns, such as diffusive movement and home ranges, while the impacts of others, such as density-dependent movements and ontogenetic migrations, have been relatively ignored. Here we review the diversity of density-independent and density-dependent movement patterns, as well as what is currently known about their consequences for the conservation and fisheries effects of marine protected areas. We highlight a number of 'partially addressed' issues in marine protected area research, such as the effects of reserves targeting specific life phases, and a number of essentially unstudied issues, such as density-dependent movements, nomadism, ontogenetic migrations, behavioral polymorphism and 'dynamic' reserves that adjust location as a realtime response to habitat changes. Assessing these issues will be essential to creating effective marine protected area networks for mobile species and accurately assessing reserve impacts on these species.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 141  
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