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Auteur Bouyoucos, I.A.; Romaine, M.; Azoulai, L.; Eustache, K.; Mourier, J.; Rummer, J.L.; Planes, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Home range of newborn blacktip reef sharks (Carcharhinus melanopterus), as estimated using mark-recapture and acoustic telemetry Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Coral Reefs  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés Elasmobranch; French Polynesia; habitat use; Kernel utilization density; Marine protected area; Minimum convex polygon; movements; Shark nursery area; space  
  Résumé (up) Sharks play important functional roles in coral reef ecosystems. Studying reef shark populations' spatial ecology also contributes important data for effective conservation planning. The purpose of this study was to define the home range of neonatal blacktip reef sharks (Carcharhinus melanopterus) around Moorea, French Polynesia, and compare estimates using both mark-recapture surveys and active acoustic telemetry. Mark-recapture surveys produced a minimum convex polygon (MCP) of 0.07 km(2) that was significantly larger than the MCP derived from acoustic telemetry (0.02 km(2)). Acoustic telemetry produced 50 and 95% kernel utilization densities that were smaller (0.02 km(2)) and larger (0.14 km(2)) than home range estimates from mark-recapture surveys, respectively. Home range estimates from this study are the smallest that have been documented for neonatal blacktip reef sharks, possibly owing to the study sites' proximity to deep channels. Mark-recapture and active acoustic telemetry are complementary approaches worthy of consideration where passive telemetry is impractical.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0722-4028 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000538953900001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2818  
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Auteur Courbin, N.; Besnard, A.; Peron, C.; Saraux, C.; Fort, J.; Perret, S.; Tornos, J.; Gremillet, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Short-term prey field lability constrains individual specialisation in resource selection and foraging site fidelity in a marine predator Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Lett.  
  Volume 21 Numéro 7 Pages 1043-1054  
  Mots-Clés behavior; Behavioural consistency; Calonectris diomedea; diet; ecology; foraging site fidelity; gannets; habitat selection; mediterranean sea; models; movement; resource selection; Scopoli's shearwater; seabirds; strategies; temporal resource dynamic; Western Mediterranean  
  Résumé (up) Spatio-temporally stable prey distributions coupled with individual foraging site fidelity are predicted to favour individual resource specialisation. Conversely, predators coping with dynamic prey distributions should diversify their individual diet and/or shift foraging areas to increase net intake. We studied individual specialisation in Scopoli's shearwaters (Calonectris diomedea) from the highly dynamic Western Mediterranean, using daily prey distributions together with resource selection, site fidelity and trophic-level analyses. As hypothesised, we found dietary diversification, low foraging site fidelity and almost no individual specialisation in resource selection. Crucially, shearwaters switched daily foraging tactics, selecting areas with contrasting prey of varying trophic levels. Overall, information use and plastic resource selection of individuals with reduced short-term foraging site fidelity allow predators to overcome prey field lability. Our study is an essential step towards a better understanding of individual responses to enhanced environmental stochasticity driven by global changes, and of pathways favouring population persistence.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2380  
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Auteur Coz, R.; Ouisse, V.; Artero, C.; Carpentier, A.; Crave, A.; Feunteun, E.; Olivier, J.M.; Perrin, B.; Ysnel, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Development of a new standardised method for sustainable monitoring of the vulnerable pink sea fan Eunicella verrucosa Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Biology  
  Volume 159 Numéro 6 Pages 1375-1388  
  Mots-Clés atlantic canada; cavolini coelenterata octocorallia; channel; gonadal development; gorgonian paramuricea-clavata; marine invertebrate; mediterranean-sea; modular growth; movement; northeast; singularis esper; water  
  Résumé (up) The aim of this survey was to test a standardised method to follow the demographic evolution of a dense aggregative 'forest' population of the temperate gorgonian Eunicella verrucosa (Octocorallia, Gorgoniidae) using in situ photographic recordings. Distribution, density, growth and demographic evolution of the colonies was compared along two parallel transects. Computer treatment allowed the estimation of the total branch fan surface area, and the individual growth of tagged colonies was determined by measuring the increase in this surface area, using consecutive photographs taken at two-year intervals. To integrate the potential bias of branch overlapping, we proposed a correction factor between the in situ photographic surface area and the surface area of the gorgonian calculated from ex situ photographic surface area with all branches deployed. The surface-frequency distribution of colonies was converted to estimated-age-frequency distribution using an estimated growth curve based on the net growth rate. The technique used revealed significant differences in population structure and the dynamics of gorgonian colonies, as the two transects appeared to be influenced by different environmental conditions. The recruitment also seemed to vary according to year and transect, resulting in different densities. Our work showed clear results in characterising the variations of gorgonian demographic evolution at a small spatial scale; thus, it is assumed that this method could be a sustainable tool for coastal environmental managers.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0025-3162 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 539  
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Auteur Fablet, R.; Chaigneau, A.; Bertrand, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Multiscale analysis of geometric planar deformations : application to wild animal electronic tracking and satellite ocean observation data Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ieee Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing  
  Volume 52 Numéro 6 Pages 3627-3636  
  Mots-Clés Animal movements; geophysical fields; multiscale geometry; planar curve; trajectory analysis; wavelet analysis  
  Résumé (up) The development of animal tracking technologies (including GPS and ARGOS satellite systems) and the increasing resolution of remote-sensing observations call for tools extracting and describing the geometric patterns along a track or within an image over a wide range of spatial scales. Whereas shape analysis has largely been addressed over the last decades, the multiscale analysis of the geometry of opened planar curves has received little attention. We here show that classical multiscale techniques cannot properly address this issue and propose an original wavelet-based scheme. To highlight the generic nature of our multiscale wavelet technique, we report applications to two different observation data sets, namely, wild animal movement paths recorded by electronic tags and satellite observations of sea-surface geophysical fields.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0196-2892 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 328  
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Auteur Bonnin, L.; Robbins, W.D.; Boussarie, G.; Kiszka, J.J.; Dagorn, L.; Mouillot, D.; Vigliola, L. doi  openurl
  Titre Repeated long-range migrations of adult males in a common Indo-Pacific reef shark Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Coral Reefs  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés carcharhinus-amblyrhynchos; carcharias; fidelity; Male-biased dispersal; Migration; movements; New Caledonia; patterns; philopatry; population; Reef shark; residency; site; Telemetry; white sharks  
  Résumé (up) The grey reef shark, Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos, is one of the most abundant coral reef sharks throughout the Indo-Pacific. However, this species has been critically impacted across its range, with well-documented population declines of > 90% attributed to human activities. A key knowledge gap in the successful implementation of grey reef shark conservation plans is the understanding of large-scale movement patterns, along with the associated biological and ecological drivers. To address this shortfall, we acoustically monitored 147 adult and juvenile grey reef sharks of all sexes for more than 2 yr across the New Caledonian archipelago, West Pacific. Here, we document multiple adult males undertaking return journeys of up to nearly 700 km in consecutive years. This constitutes the first evidence of repeated long-range migrations for this species. Although only a limited number of adult males were definitively tracked undertaking migrations, similar timing in changes in the detection patterns of a further 13 animals, mostly adult males, suggests this behavior may be more common than previously thought. The paucity of evidence for juvenile migrations and timing of adult movements suggest that mating is the motivation behind these migrations. Our results have important implications for management, given the potential of mature individuals to recurrently travel outside managed or protected areas. Future management of this species clearly needs to consider the importance of large-scale migratory behaviors when developing management plans.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0722-4028 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000496832900001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2670  
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