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Auteur Sirot, C.; Gronkjaer, P.; Pedersen, J.B.; Panfili, J.; Zetina-Rejon, M.; Tripp-Valdez, A.; Ramos-Miranda, J.; Flores-Hernandez, D.; Sosa-Lopez, A.; Darnaude, A.M. doi  openurl
  Titre Using otolith organic matter to detect diet shifts in Bardiella chrysoura, during a period of environmental changes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.  
  Volume 575 Numéro Pages 137-152  
  Mots-Clés aquatic ecosystems; Bairdiella chrysoura; climate-change; Coastal ecosystem; fish otoliths; food-web; movement patterns; prey availability; Stable isotope analysis; stable-isotope analysis; survival; temporal-changes; terminos lagoon; Trophic ecology; Trophic interactions  
  Résumé Accurate knowledge on fish trophic ecology and its modifications is crucial for understanding the impact of global change on ecosystems. In this context, we investigated the value of the delta C-13 and delta N-15 of otolith soluble organic matter (SOM) for identifying temporal diet shifts in American silver perch Bairdiella chrysoura over a 30-yr period characterized by strong changes in its population size and habitats within the Terminos Lagoon (Mexico). We first compared the otolith SOM isotopic signatures from present-clay adults to those of muscle and the main local prey. Our results suggest that otolith SOM can be confidently extracted and analyzed for both present and past otoliths of this species. The mean otolith SOM signatures obtained (-15.92 +/- 1.35%, for delta C-13 and 9.38 +/- 0.93%, for delta N-15) were consistent with those of the diet as 85% of the individual signatures were included within the prey isotopic niche area. Moreover, this study supports a trophic enrichment factor between diet and otolith (TEFdiet-otolith) close to 0 for delta N-15, while for delta C-13, the TEFololith-muscle of +0.02% warrants further investigation. Then, we compared past and contemporary otolith SOM signatures to investigate temporal diet shifts in B. chrysoura. This showed that 613C and delta N-15 differed significantly between the past and present period even if the temporal shift remained relatively small (respectively +1.17%, and 0.55%). The present study substantiates the use of otolith SOM delta C-13 and delta N-15 as a proxy of fish present and past trophic position, opening the possibility for major progress in studies of temporal changes in food web ecology.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2172  
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Auteur Coz, R.; Ouisse, V.; Artero, C.; Carpentier, A.; Crave, A.; Feunteun, E.; Olivier, J.M.; Perrin, B.; Ysnel, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Development of a new standardised method for sustainable monitoring of the vulnerable pink sea fan Eunicella verrucosa Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Marine Biology  
  Volume 159 Numéro 6 Pages 1375-1388  
  Mots-Clés atlantic canada; cavolini coelenterata octocorallia; channel; gonadal development; gorgonian paramuricea-clavata; marine invertebrate; mediterranean-sea; modular growth; movement; northeast; singularis esper; water  
  Résumé The aim of this survey was to test a standardised method to follow the demographic evolution of a dense aggregative 'forest' population of the temperate gorgonian Eunicella verrucosa (Octocorallia, Gorgoniidae) using in situ photographic recordings. Distribution, density, growth and demographic evolution of the colonies was compared along two parallel transects. Computer treatment allowed the estimation of the total branch fan surface area, and the individual growth of tagged colonies was determined by measuring the increase in this surface area, using consecutive photographs taken at two-year intervals. To integrate the potential bias of branch overlapping, we proposed a correction factor between the in situ photographic surface area and the surface area of the gorgonian calculated from ex situ photographic surface area with all branches deployed. The surface-frequency distribution of colonies was converted to estimated-age-frequency distribution using an estimated growth curve based on the net growth rate. The technique used revealed significant differences in population structure and the dynamics of gorgonian colonies, as the two transects appeared to be influenced by different environmental conditions. The recruitment also seemed to vary according to year and transect, resulting in different densities. Our work showed clear results in characterising the variations of gorgonian demographic evolution at a small spatial scale; thus, it is assumed that this method could be a sustainable tool for coastal environmental managers.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0025-3162 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 539  
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Auteur Thorne, L.H.; Hazen, E.L.; Bograd, S.J.; Foley, D.G.; Conners, M.G.; Kappes, M.A.; Kim, H.M.; Costa, D.P.; Tremblay, Y.; Shaffer, S.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Foraging behavior links climate variability and reproduction in North Pacific albatrosses Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Movement Ecology  
  Volume 3 Numéro 1 Pages 27  
  Mots-Clés Albatross; Climate; Environmental variability; Movement; Reproductive success  
  Résumé Climate-driven environmental change in the North Pacific has been well documented, with marked effects on the habitat and foraging behavior of marine predators. However, the mechanistic linkages connecting climate-driven changes in behavior to predator populations are not well understood. We evaluated the effects of climate-driven environmental variability on the reproductive success and foraging behavior of Laysan and Black-footed albatrosses breeding in the Northwest Hawaiian Islands during both brooding and incubating periods. We assessed foraging trip metrics and reproductive success using data collected from 2002–2012 and 1981–2012, respectively, relative to variability in the location of the Transition Zone Chlorophyll Front (TZCF, an important foraging region for albatrosses), sea surface temperature (SST), Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI), and the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation index (NPGO).  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2051-3933 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1462  
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Auteur Queiroz, N.; Humphries, N.E.; Couto, A.; Vedor, M.; da Costa, I.; Sequeira, A.M.M.; Mucientes, G.; Santos, A.M.; Abascal, F.J.; Abercrombie, D.L.; Abrantes, K.; Acuna-Marrero, D.; Afonso, A.S.; Afonso, P.; Anders, D.; Araujo, G.; Arauz, R.; Bach, P.; Barnett, A.; Bernal, D.; Berumen, M.L.; Lion, S.B.; Bezerra, N.P.A.; Blaison, A.V.; Block, B.A.; Bond, M.E.; Bonfil, R.; Bradford, R.W.; Braun, C.D.; Brooks, E.J.; Brooks, A.; Brown, J.; Bruce, B.D.; Byrne, M.E.; Campana, S.E.; Carlisle, A.B.; Chapman, D.D.; Chapple, T.K.; Chisholm, J.; Clarke, C.R.; Clua, E.G.; Cochran, J.E.M.; Crochelet, E.C.; Dagorn, L.; Daly, R.; Cortes, D.D.; Doyle, T.K.; Drew, M.; Duffy, C.A.J.; Erikson, T.; Espinoza, E.; Ferreira, L.C.; Ferretti, F.; Filmalter, J.D.; Fischer, G.C.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Fontes, J.; Forget, F.; Fowler, M.; Francis, M.P.; Gallagher, A.J.; Gennari, E.; Goldsworthy, S.D.; Gollock, M.J.; Green, J.R.; Gustafson, J.A.; Guttridge, T.L.; Guzman, H.M.; Hammerschlag, N.; Harman, L.; Hazin, F.H.V.; Heard, M.; Hearn, A.R.; Holdsworth, J.C.; Holmes, B.J.; Howey, L.A.; Hoyos, M.; Hueter, R.E.; Hussey, N.E.; Huveneers, C.; Irion, D.T.; Jacoby, D.M.P.; Jewell, O.J.D.; Johnson, R.; Jordan, L.K.B.; Jorgensen, S.J.; Joyce, W.; Daly, C.A.K.; Ketchum, J.T.; Klimley, A.P.; Kock, A.A.; Koen, P.; Ladino, F.; Lana, F.O.; Lea, J.S.E.; Llewellyn, F.; Lyon, W.S.; MacDonnell, A.; Macena, B.C.L.; Marshall, H.; McAllister, J.D.; McAuley, R.; Meyer, M.A.; Morris, J.J.; Nelson, E.R.; Papastamatiou, Y.P.; Patterson, T.A.; Penaherrera-Palma, C.; Pepperell, J.G.; Pierce, S.J.; Poisson, F.; Quintero, L.M.; Richardson, A.J.; Rogers, P.J.; Rohner, C.A.; Rowat, D.R.L.; Samoilys, M.; Semmens, J.M.; Sheaves, M.; Shillinger, G.; Shivji, M.; Singh, S.; Skomal, G.B.; Smale, M.J.; Snyders, L.B.; Soler, G.; Soria, M.; Stehfest, K.M.; Stevens, J.D.; Thorrold, S.R.; Tolotti, M.T.; Towner, A.; Travassos, P.; Tyminski, J.P.; Vandeperre, F.; Vaudo, J.J.; Watanabe, Y.Y.; Weber, S.B.; Wetherbee, B.M.; White, T.D.; Williams, S.; Zarate, P.M.; Harcourt, R.; Hays, G.C.; Meekan, M.G.; Thums, M.; Irigoien, X.; Eguiluz, V.M.; Duarte, C.M.; Sousa, L.L.; Simpson, S.J.; Southall, E.J.; Sims, D.W. doi  openurl
  Titre Global spatial risk assessment of sharks under the footprint of fisheries Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Nature  
  Volume 572 Numéro 7770 Pages 461-+  
  Mots-Clés bycatch; conservation; geolocation; improving light; model; movements; patterns; pelagic sharks; temperature; tracking  
  Résumé Effective ocean management and the conservation of highly migratory species depend on resolving the overlap between animal movements and distributions, and fishing effort. However, this information is lacking at a global scale. Here we show, using a big-data approach that combines satellite-tracked movements of pelagic sharks and global fishing fleets, that 24% of the mean monthly space used by sharks falls under the footprint of pelagic longline fisheries. Space-use hotspots of commercially valuable sharks and of internationally protected species had the highest overlap with longlines (up to 76% and 64%, respectively), and were also associated with significant increases in fishing effort. We conclude that pelagic sharks have limited spatial refuge from current levels of fishing effort in marine areas beyond national jurisdictions (the high seas). Our results demonstrate an urgent need for conservation and management measures at high-seas hotspots of shark space use, and highlight the potential of simultaneous satellite surveillance of megafauna and fishers as a tool for near-real-time, dynamic management.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000482219600033 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2614  
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Auteur Pirog, A.; Jaquemet, S.; Blaison, A.; Soria, M.; Magalon, H. doi  openurl
  Titre Isolation and characterization of eight microsatellite loci from Galeocerdo cuvier (tiger shark) and cross-amplification in Carcharhinus leucas, Carcharhinus brevipinna, Carcharhinus plumbeus and Sphyrna lewini Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) PeerJ  
  Volume 4 Numéro Pages e2041  
  Mots-Clés age; bull; Carcharhiniform; Control region; growth; hawaiian waters; markers; microsatellites; movements; patterns; Population Genetics; software; western north-atlantic  
  Résumé The tiger shark Galeocerdo cuvier (Carcharhinidae) is a large elasmobranch suspected to have, as other apex predators, a keystone function in marine ecosystems and is currently considered Near Threatened (Red list IUCN). Knowledge on its ecology, which is crucial to design proper conservation and management plans, is very scarce. Here we describe the isolation of eight polymorphic microsatellite loci using 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing of enriched DNA libraries. Their characteristics were tested on a population of tiger shark (n = 101) from Reunion Island (South-Western Indian Ocean). All loci were polymorphic with a number of alleles ranging from two to eight. No null alleles were detected and no linkage disequilibrium was detected after Bonferroni correction. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.03 to 0.76 and from 0.03 to 0.77, respectively. No locus deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and the global F-IS of the population was of 0.04(NS). Some of the eight loci developed here successfully cross-amplified in the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas (one locus), the spinner shark Carcharhinus brevi pi n n a (four loci), the sandbar shark Carcharhinus plumbeus (five loci) and the scalloped hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini (two loci). We also designed primers to amplify and sequence a mitochondrial marker, the control region. We sequenced 862 bp and found a low genetic diversity, with four polymorphic sites, a haplotype diversity of 0.15 and a nucleotide diversity of 2 x 10(-4).  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1651  
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