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Auteur Viricel, A.; Simon-Bouhet, B.; Ceyrac, L.; Dulau-Drouot, V.; Berggren, P.; Amir, O.A.; Jiddawi, N.S.; Mongin, P.; Kiszka, J.J. doi  openurl
  Titre Habitat availability and geographic isolation as potential drivers of population structure in an oceanic dolphin in the Southwest Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Biol.  
  Volume (down) 163 Numéro 10 Pages 219  
  Mots-Clés biologically meaningful; bottle-nosed dolphins; genetic differentiation; marine populations; megaptera-novaeangliae; microsatellite loci; mozambique channel; spinner dolphins; stenella-longirostris; tursiops-truncatus  
  Résumé Delphinid populations show highly variable patterns of genetic diversity and population structure. Previous studies indicate that habitat discontinuities and geographic isolation are major drivers of population division in cetaceans. Spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) are distributed in all tropical oceans, but they are particularly common around islands and atolls. This species occurs in shallow waters at daytime to rest and socialise, and feeds on offshore mesopelagic prey overnight. Here, we investigated the genetic population structure of spinner dolphins in the Southwest Indian Ocean along a west-east geographic gradient, from eastern Africa to the Mascarene archipelago. We combined analyses of 12 microsatellite loci, mtDNA control region sequences, and sighting data to assess genetic differentiation and characterise habitat preferences of these populations. Significant genetic structure among the three sampled sites (Zanzibar, Mayotte and La Reunion) was observed using both types of molecular markers. Overall, our results indicate that geographic isolation and potentially other factors, such as shallow-water habitats to rest and socialise, may be important drivers of the genetic population structure of insular spinner dolphins in this region.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0025-3162 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1700  
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Auteur ARNAUD-HAOND, S.; MOALIC, Y.; HERNANDEZ-GARCIA, E.; EGUILUZ, V.M.; ALBERTO, F.; SERRAO, E.A.; DUARTE, C.M. url  openurl
  Titre Disentangling the Influence of Mutation and Migration in Clonal Seagrasses Using the Genetic Diversity Spectrum for Microsatellites Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal Of Heredity  
  Volume (down) 105 Numéro 4 Pages 532-541  
  Mots-Clés clonality; genetic divergence; Genetic Diversity Spectrum; microsatellites; Seagrass; stepwise mutation  
  Résumé The recurrent lack of isolation by distance reported at regional scale in seagrass species was recently suggested to stem from stochastic events of large-scale dispersal. We explored the usefulness of phylogenetic information contained in microsatellite loci to test this hypothesis by using the Genetic Diversity Spectrum (GDS) on databases containing, respectively, 7 and 9 microsatellites genotypes for 1541 sampling units of Posidonia oceanica and 1647 of Cymodocea nodosa. The simultaneous increase of microsatellite and geographic distances that emerges reveals a coherent pattern of isolation by distance in contrast to the chaotic pattern previously described using allele frequencies, in particular, for the long-lived P. oceanica. These results suggest that the lack of isolation by distance, rather than the resulting from rare events of large-scale dispersal, reflects at least for some species a stronger influence of mutation over migration at the scale of the distribution range. The global distribution of genetic polymorphism may, therefore, result predominantly from ancient events of step-by-step (re)colonization followed by local recruitment and clonal growth, rather than contemporary gene flow. The analysis of GDS appears useful to unravel the evolutionary forces influencing the dynamics and evolution at distinct temporal and spatial scales by accounting for phylogenetic information borne by microsatellites, under an appropriate mutation model. This finding adds nuance to the generalization of the influence of large-scale dispersal on the dynamics of seagrasses.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0022-1503 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1138  
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Auteur Genovesi, B.; Berrebi, P.; Nagai, S.; Reynaud, N.; Wang, J.; Masseret, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Geographic structure evidenced in the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium pacificum Litaker (A. catenella – group IV (Whedon & Kofoid) Balech) along Japanese and Chinese coastal waters Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Pollution Bulletin  
  Volume (down) 98 Numéro 1–2 Pages 95-105  
  Mots-Clés Alexandrium pacificum (A. catenella – group IV); Harmful algal blooms; Invasive species distribution; Microsatellites markers; Temperate Asian coasts; Toxic dinoflagellate  
  Résumé Abstract

The intra-specific diversity and genetic structure within the Alexandrium pacificum Litaker (A. catenella – Group IV) populations along the Temperate Asian coasts, were studied among individuals isolated from Japan to China. The UPGMA dendrogram and FCA revealed the existence of 3 clusters. Assignment analysis suggested the occurrence of gene flows between the Japanese Pacific coast (cluster-1) and the Chinese Zhejiang coast (cluster-2). Human transportations are suspected to explain the lack of genetic difference between several pairs of distant Japanese samples, hardly explained by a natural dispersal mechanism. The genetic isolation of the population established in the Sea of Japan (cluster-3) suggested the existence of a strong ecological and geographical barrier. Along the Pacific coasts, the South–North current allows limited exchanges between Chinese and Japanese populations. The relationships between Temperate Asian and Mediterranean individuals suggested different scenario of large-scale dispersal mechanisms.
 
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0025-326x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1352  
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Auteur Laporte, M.; Shao, Z.; Berrebi, P.; Laabir, M.; Abadie, E.; Faivre, N.; Rieuvilleneuve, F.; Masseret, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Isolation of 12 microsatellite markers following a pyrosequencing procedure and cross-priming in two invasive cryptic species, Alexandrium catenella (group IV) and A. tamarense (group III) (Dinophyceae) Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Pollution Bulletin  
  Volume (down) 83 Numéro 1 Pages 302-305  
  Mots-Clés Alexandrium; Biogeography; Invasive species; Microsatellite markers; dinophyceae; phytoplankton  
  Résumé Alexandrium catenella (group IV) and Alexandrium tamarense (group III) (Dinophyceae) are two cryptic invasive phytoplankton species belonging to the A. tamarense species complex. Their worldwide spread is favored by the human activities, transportation and climate change. In order to describe their diversity in the Mediterranean Sea and understand their settlements and maintenances in this area, new microsatellite markers were developed based on Thau lagoon (France) samples of A. catenella and A. tamarense strains. In this study twelve new microsatellite markers are proposed. Five of these microsatellite markers show amplifications on A. tamarense and ten on A. catenella. Three of these 12 microsatellite markers allowed amplifications on both cryptic species. Finally, the haplotypic diversity ranged from 0.000 to 0.791 and 0.000 to 0.942 for A. catenella and A. tamarense respectively.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0025-326x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 668  
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Auteur Pirog, A.; Jaquemet, S.; Soria, M.; Magalon, H. doi  openurl
  Titre First evidence of multiple paternity in the bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas) Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Freshw. Res.  
  Volume (down) 68 Numéro 1 Pages 195-201  
  Mots-Clés brown smoothhound shark; convenience polyandry; genetic benefits; hammerhead shark; mating-behavior; microsatellite; microsatellite null alleles; mustelus-henlei; paternity test; polyandry; population sizes; triaenodon-obesus; whitetip reef shark  
  Résumé The present study assessed the occurrence of multiple paternity in four litters of bull shark Carcharhinus leucas (n = 5, 8, 9 and 11 embryos) sampled at Reunion Island in the Western Indian Ocean. Using 21 microsatellite loci, we revealed that two litters were generated from two sires each, demonstrating for the first time multiple paternity for this species. We also reported a high paternal skew (10 : 1 in Litter 1 and 7 : 1 in Litter 3), which may be because of post-copulatory or post-zygotic selection processes. These results contribute to a better understanding of the reproductive behaviour of the bull shark, which remains poorly documented. The present study must be expanded to assess the frequency of multiple paternity in this species, and to test for genetic or cryptic benefits (convenience polyandry), which is important for long-term conservation and management plans.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1323-1650 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2073  
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