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Auteur Dalongeville, A.; Andrello, M.; Mouillot, D.; Albouy, C.; Manel, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecological traits shape genetic diversity patterns across the Mediterranean Sea: a quantitative review on fishes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 43 Numéro 4 Pages 845-857  
  Mots-Clés atlantic bluefin tuna; bass dicentrarchus-labrax; climate-change; cod gadus-morhua; ecological traits; effective population-size; genetic diversity; gilthead sea; life-history traits; marine fishes; marine populations; Mediterranean Sea; microsatellite markers; microsatellites; mitochondrial; mitochondrial DNA; molecular markers; population genetics  
  Résumé AimWe set out to identify the determinants of the variation in genetic diversity among fish species and test whether multi-species genetic diversity is randomly distributed in space. LocationMediterranean Sea. MethodsWe collected genetic diversity data from 39 published studies on Mediterranean fishes (31 species) along with the spatial coordinates of the sampling sites. We focused on microsatellite heterozygosity (151 data points) and mitochondrial haplotype diversity (201 data points). We used linear regressions to link genetic diversity and 11 ecological traits. We also tested for spatial autocorrelation and trends in the residuals. ResultsAmong-species variation in microsatellite heterozygosity was explained by three ecological traits: vertical distribution, migration type and body length. Variation in mitochondrial haplotype diversity was also explained by vertical distribution and migration type, and by reproductive strategy (semelparity). However, vertical distribution and migration type showed opposite effects on microsatellites and mitochondrial diversity. After accounting for the effects of ecological traits, no spatial pattern was detected, except for one of the species considered. Main conclusionsEcological factors explain an important proportion of the among-species genetic diversity. These results suggest that life history strategies of the species influence the variation of microsatellite diversity indirectly through their effect on effective population size, while the spatial variations of genetic diversity seem to be too complex to be identified in our analysis. We found very different effects of traits on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA diversity, which can be explained by the specificities of mitochondrial DNA (absence of recombination, maternal inheritance and non-neutrality).  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1627  
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Auteur Pirog, A.; Jaquemet, S.; Soria, M.; Magalon, H. doi  openurl
  Titre First evidence of multiple paternity in the bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas) Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Freshw. Res.  
  Volume 68 Numéro 1 Pages 195-201  
  Mots-Clés brown smoothhound shark; convenience polyandry; genetic benefits; hammerhead shark; mating-behavior; microsatellite; microsatellite null alleles; mustelus-henlei; paternity test; polyandry; population sizes; triaenodon-obesus; whitetip reef shark  
  Résumé The present study assessed the occurrence of multiple paternity in four litters of bull shark Carcharhinus leucas (n = 5, 8, 9 and 11 embryos) sampled at Reunion Island in the Western Indian Ocean. Using 21 microsatellite loci, we revealed that two litters were generated from two sires each, demonstrating for the first time multiple paternity for this species. We also reported a high paternal skew (10 : 1 in Litter 1 and 7 : 1 in Litter 3), which may be because of post-copulatory or post-zygotic selection processes. These results contribute to a better understanding of the reproductive behaviour of the bull shark, which remains poorly documented. The present study must be expanded to assess the frequency of multiple paternity in this species, and to test for genetic or cryptic benefits (convenience polyandry), which is important for long-term conservation and management plans.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1323-1650 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2073  
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Auteur Viricel, A.; Simon-Bouhet, B.; Ceyrac, L.; Dulau-Drouot, V.; Berggren, P.; Amir, O.A.; Jiddawi, N.S.; Mongin, P.; Kiszka, J.J. doi  openurl
  Titre Habitat availability and geographic isolation as potential drivers of population structure in an oceanic dolphin in the Southwest Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Biol.  
  Volume 163 Numéro 10 Pages 219  
  Mots-Clés biologically meaningful; bottle-nosed dolphins; genetic differentiation; marine populations; megaptera-novaeangliae; microsatellite loci; mozambique channel; spinner dolphins; stenella-longirostris; tursiops-truncatus  
  Résumé Delphinid populations show highly variable patterns of genetic diversity and population structure. Previous studies indicate that habitat discontinuities and geographic isolation are major drivers of population division in cetaceans. Spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) are distributed in all tropical oceans, but they are particularly common around islands and atolls. This species occurs in shallow waters at daytime to rest and socialise, and feeds on offshore mesopelagic prey overnight. Here, we investigated the genetic population structure of spinner dolphins in the Southwest Indian Ocean along a west-east geographic gradient, from eastern Africa to the Mascarene archipelago. We combined analyses of 12 microsatellite loci, mtDNA control region sequences, and sighting data to assess genetic differentiation and characterise habitat preferences of these populations. Significant genetic structure among the three sampled sites (Zanzibar, Mayotte and La Reunion) was observed using both types of molecular markers. Overall, our results indicate that geographic isolation and potentially other factors, such as shallow-water habitats to rest and socialise, may be important drivers of the genetic population structure of insular spinner dolphins in this region.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0025-3162 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1700  
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