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Auteur Donati, G.F.A.; Parravicini, V.; Leprieur, F.; Hagen, O.; Gaboriau, T.; Heine, C.; Kulbicki, M.; Rolland, J.; Salamin, N.; Albouy, C.; Pellissier, L.
Titre A process-based model supports an association between dispersal and the prevalence of species traits in tropical reef fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés biodiversity; body-size; dispersal; diversification; diversity; extinction rates; genetic-structure; geographic range size; global patterns; latitudinal gradient; mechanistic models; propagule dispersal; reef fish; speciation; traits
Résumé Habitat dynamics interacting with species dispersal abilities could generate gradients in species diversity and prevalence of species traits when the latter are associated with species dispersal potential. Using a process-based model of diversification constrained by a dispersal parameter, we simulated the interplay between reef habitat dynamics during the past 140 million years and dispersal, shaping lineage diversification history and assemblage composition globally. The emerging patterns from the simulations were compared to current prevalence of species traits related to dispersal for 6315 tropical reef fish species. We found a significant spatial congruence between the prevalence of simulated low dispersal values and areas with a large proportion of species characterized by small adult body size, narrow home range mobility behaviour, pelagic larval duration shorter than 21 days and diurnal activity. Species characterized by such traits were found predominantly in the Indo-Australian Archipelago and the Caribbean Sea. Furthermore, the frequency distribution of the dispersal parameter was found to match empirical distributions for body size, PLD and home range mobility behaviour. Also, the dispersal parameter in the simulations was associated to diversification rates and resulted in trait frequency matching empirical distributions. Overall, our findings suggest that past habitat dynamics, in conjunction with dispersal processes, influenced diversification in tropical reef fishes, which may explain the present-day geography of species traits.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000487946300001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2647
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Auteur FROMENTIN, J.-M.; ERNANDE, B.; FABLET, R.; DE PONTUAL, H.
Titre Importance and future of individual markers for the ecosystem approach to fisheries Type Article scientifique
Année 2009 Publication Aquatic Living Resources Revue Abrégée
Volume 22 Numéro 4 Pages 395-408
Mots-Clés Genetic marker; Biochemical marker; Electronic tag; Otolith; Isotope; Population structure; Statistical and mechanistic model; Fisheries
Résumé The use of genetic, biochemical and electronic markers in population biology and ecology has been growing tremendously during the last two decades. The first part of this paper aims at reviewing the main principles and advances of these individual markers through a few key applications on exploited marine fish populations. The second part is more prospective and investigates some possibilities that could arise in the near future through: (i) the development of new markers, (ii) the combination of different markers and (iii) the combination of quantitative approaches-whether classical or new-with individual markers. It is finally stressed how crucial individual markers will be to unravel the biocomplexity of wild fish populations and the key role they should play in the implementation of the ecosystem approach to fisheries.
Adresse IFREMER, STH, LASAA, F-29280 Plouzane, France.
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Editeur Edp Sciences S A Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0990-7440 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ 11163 collection 1012
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Auteur Gaboriau, T.; Albouy, C.; Descombes, P.; Mouillot, D.; Pellissier, L.; Leprieur, F.
Titre Ecological constraints coupled with deep-time habitat dynamics predict the latitudinal diversity gradient in reef fishes Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.
Volume 286 Numéro 1911 Pages 20191506
Mots-Clés biodiversity; climate; diversification; environmental-changes; global patterns; latitudinal diversity gradient; mechanistic model; niche conservatism; palaeohabitat; plate-tectonics; rates; reef fish; relative roles; species richness
Résumé We develop a spatially explicit model of diversification based on palaeohabitat to explore the predictions of four major hypotheses potentially explaining the latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG), namely, the 'time-area', 'tropical niche conservatism', 'ecological limits' and 'evolutionary speed' livpotheses. We compare simulation outputs to observed diversity gradients in the global reef fish fauna. Our simulations show that these hypotheses are nonmutually exclusive and that their relative influence depends on the time scale considered. Simulations suggest that reef habitat dynamics produced the LDG during deep geological time, while ecological constraints shaped the modern LDG, with a strong influence of the reduction in the latitudinal extent of tropical reefs during the Neogene. Overall, this study illustrates how mechanistic models in ecology and evolution can provide a temporal and spatial understanding of the role of speciation, extinction and dispersal in generating biodiversity patterns.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000486417800008 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2650
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Auteur Kelly, N.; Cousens, R.D.; Taghizadeh, M.S.; Hanan, J.S.; Mouillot, D.
Titre Plants as populations of release sites for seed dispersal: a structural-statistical analysis of the effects of competition on Raphanus raphanistrum Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Ecol.
Volume 101 Numéro 4 Pages 878-888
Mots-Clés apical dominance; binary topological trees; canopy; density; dispersal; environments; fruit; invasive plant; long-distance dispersal; mechanistic model; plant architecture; propagule; seed; seed dispersal; shadow; wild radish; wind dispersal
Résumé Trajectories of dispersing seeds begin at the positions of their fruits on the maternal plant. Mechanistic simulation models usually assume that seed release is restricted to a characteristic, species-specific height. However, real canopies constitute distributed rather than point sources, which may have important consequences for dispersal kernels. Fruit positions are determined by plant architecture, which is under both genetic control and environmental influence. Competition with other plants has a major modifying influence on canopy structure. We used quantitative methods to describe the positions of fruits on plants of Raphanus raphanistrum L., examined how fruit spatial distributions change when plants grow under interspecific competition and explored how this is related to changes in the structural geometry and topology of the plant. Raphanus raphanistrum was grown either as individual plants or in a wheat crop. Branching structures and fruit positions were captured using a three-dimensional digitizer. Propagule locations were also mapped on the ground after dispersal. Fruit distributions pre-dispersal were analysed using various statistical approaches; plant topological and geometrical indices were calculated for the branching structures. Plants grown under competition were smaller, but the reduced size was because fewer modules were produced rather than because individual branches were in some way different. The distribution of these branches was also different under competition, with more apical dominance resulting in less branching along dominant modules. Under competition, fruits were concentrated in the upper parts of the canopy and closer, in the horizontal plane, to the base of the plant. This resulted in much more restricted local seed shadows post-dispersal. Synthesis. The effect of competition on plant size is primarily a result of a reduction in initiation of branches. For species with limited dispersal ability, this results in a greatly modified seed shadow at short distances. In the case of agricultural weeds, the concentration of fruits at greater heights when competing with a crop might result in a greater proportion being dispersed long distances by harvesting machinery, but they would be fewer in number.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-0477 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 774
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