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Auteur Navarro, J.; Saez-Liante, R.; Albo-Puigserver, M.; Coll, M.; Palomera, I. doi  openurl
  Titre Feeding strategies and ecological roles of three predatory pelagic fish in the western Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.  
  Volume 140 Numéro Pages 9-17  
  Mots-Clés diet; ecosystem structure; iberian peninsula; indian-ocean; isotope ratios; Marine predators; Pelagic ecosystem; Stable isotopes; stable-isotopes; Stomach contents; swordfish; top predators; Trophic ecology; trophic level; xiphias-gladius; Yellowfin tuna  
  Résumé Knowing the feeding ecology of marine predators is pivotal to developing an understanding of their ecological role in the ecosystem and determining the trophic relationships between them. Despite the ecological importance of predatory pelagic fish species, research on these species in the Mediterranean Sea is limited. Here, by combining analyses of stomach contents and stable isotope values, we examined the feeding strategies of swordfish, Xiphias gladius, little tunny, Euthynnus alletteratus and Atlantic bonito, Sarda sarda, in the western Mediterranean Sea. We also compared the trophic niche and trophic level of these species with published information of other sympatric pelagic predators present in the ecosystem. Results indicated that, although the diet of the three species was composed mainly by fin-fish species, a clear segregation in their main feeding strategies was found. Swordfish showed a generalist diet including demersal species such as blue whiting, Micromesistius poutassou, and European hake, Merluccius merluccius, and pelagic fin-fish such as barracudina species (Arctozenus risso and Lestidiops jayakari) or small pelagic fish species. Little tunny and Atlantic bonito were segregated isotopically between them and showed a diet basically composed of anchovy, Engraulis encrasicolus, and round sardinella, Sardinella aurita, and sardines, Sardina pilchardus, respectively. This trophic segregation, in addition to potential segregation by depth, is likely a mechanism that allows their potential coexistence within the same pelagic habitat. When the trophic position of these three predatory pelagic fish species is compared with other pelagic predators such as bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus, and dolphinfish, Coryphaena hippurus, present in the western Mediterranean Sea, we found that they show similar intermediate trophic position in the ecosystem. In conclusion, the combined stomach and isotopic results highlight, especially for little tunny and Atlantic bonito, the trophic importance of Clupeoid species in their diet. In addition, the importance of demersal resources for swordfish provides evidence for the pelagic-demersal coupling of the ecosystem and the need to manage marine resources in an integrated way. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2175  
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Auteur Briscoe, D.K.; Hobday, A.J.; Carlisle, A.; Scales, K.; Eveson, J.P.; Arrizabalaga, H.; Druon, J.N.; Fromentin, J.-M. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecological bridges and barriers in pelagic ecosystems Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.  
  Volume 140 Numéro Pages 182-192  
  Mots-Clés arctic marine mammals; atlantic bluefin tuna; Billfish; Brazilian episode; climate-change; el-nino; interannual variation; Marine mammal; marlin makaira-nigricans; Migration corridors; Oceanographic features; population connectivity; satellite archival tags; sea-turtles; site fidelity; species distribution; thunnus-maccoyii; Tuna  
  Résumé Many highly mobile species are known to use persistent pathways or corridors to move between habitat patches in which conditions are favorable for particular activities, such as breeding or foraging. In the marine realm, environmental variability can lead to the development of temporary periods of anomalous oceanographic conditions that can connect individuals to areas of habitat outside a population's usual range, or alternatively, restrict individuals from areas usually within their range, thus acting as ecological bridges or ecological barriers. These temporary features can result in novel or irregular trophic interactions and changes in population spatial dynamics, and, therefore, may have significant implications for management of marine ecosystems. Here, we provide evidence of ecological bridges and barriers in different ocean regions, drawing upon five case studies in which particular oceanographic conditions have facilitated or restricted the movements of individuals from highly migratory species. We discuss the potential population-level significance of ecological bridges and barriers, with respect to the life history characteristics of different species, and inter- and intra-population variability in habitat use. Finally, we summarize the persistence of bridge dynamics with time, our ability to monitor bridges and barriers in a changing climate, and implications for forecasting future climate mediated ecosystem change.  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2178  
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Auteur Lucena-Fredou, F.; Kell, L.; Fredou, T.; Gaertner, D.; Potier, M.; Bach, P.; Travassos, P.; Hazin, F.; Menard, F. doi  openurl
  Titre Vulnerability of teleosts caught by the pelagic tuna longline fleets in South Atlantic and Western Indian Oceans Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.  
  Volume 140 Numéro Pages 230-241  
  Mots-Clés Bycatch; climate-change; ecological risk-assessment; exploitation status; Fishery management; impact; life-history strategies; management; marine fishes; Productivity and Susceptibility Analysis; risk; Sustainability; trawl fishery  
  Résumé Productivity and Susceptibility Analysis (PSA) is a methodology for evaluating the vulnerability of a stock based on its biological productivity and susceptibility to fishing. In this study, we evaluated the vulnerability of 60 stocks of tuna, billfishes and other teleosts caught by the tuna longline fleets operating in the South Atlantic and Indian Ocean using a semi-quantitative PSA. We (a) evaluated the vulnerability of the species in the study areas; (b) compared the vulnerability of target and non-target species and oceans; (c) analyzed the sensitivity of data entry; and (d) compared the results of the PSA to other fully quantitative assessment methods. Istiophoridae exhibited the highest scores for vulnerability. The top 10 species at risk were: Atlantic Istiophorus albicans; Indian Ocean Istiompax indica; Atlantic Makaira nigricans and Thunnus alalunga; Indian Ocean Xiphias gladius; Atlantic T. albacares, Gempylus serpens, Ranzania laevis and X. gladius; and Indian Ocean T. alalunga. All species considered at high risk were targeted or were commercialized bycatch, except for the Atlantic G. serpens and R. laevis which.were discarded, and may be considered as a false positive. Those species and others at high risk should be prioritized for further assessment and/or data collection. Most species at moderate risk were bycatch species kept for sale. Conversely, species classified at low risk were mostly discarded. Overall, species at high risk were overfished and/or subjected to overfishing. Moreover, all species considered to be within extinction risk (Critically Endangered, Endangered and Vulnerable) were in the high risk category. The good concordance between approaches corroborates the results of our analysis. PSA is not a replacement for traditional stock assessments, where a stock is assessed at regular intervals to provide management advice. It is of importance, however, where there is uncertainty about catches and life history parameters, since it can identify species at risk, and where management action and data collection is required, e.g. for many species at high and most at moderate risk in the South Atlantic and Indian oceans.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2179  
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Auteur Espinosa, F.; Rivera-Ingraham, G.A. doi  isbn
openurl 
  Titre Biological Conservation of Giant Limpets: The Implications of Large Size Type Chapitre de livre
  Année (down) 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée  
  Volume Numéro Pages 105-155  
  Mots-Clés cymbula-nigra gastropoda; endangered limpet; lottia-gigantea; marine protected areas; mussel mytilus-galloprovincialis; patella-ferruginea gastropoda; population-structure; scutellastra-argenvillei; sex-change; south-african limpet  
  Résumé Patellogastropods, also known as true limpets, are distributed throughout the world and constitute key species in coastal ecosystems. Some limpet species achieve remarkable sizes, which in the most extreme cases can surpass 35 cm in shell length. In this review, we focus on giant limpets, which are defined as those with a maximum shell size surpassing 10 cm. According to the scientific literature, there are a total of 14 species across five genera that reach these larger sizes. Four of these species are threatened or in danger of extinction. Inhabiting the intertidal zones, limpets are frequently affected by anthropogenic impacts, namely collection by humans, pollution and habitat fragmentation. In the case of larger species, their conspicuous size has made them especially prone to human collection since prehistoric times. Size is not phylogeny-dependent among giant limpets, but is instead related to behavioural traits instead. Larger-sized species tend to be nonmigratory and territorial compared to those that are smaller. Collection by humans has been cited as the main cause behind the decline and/or extinction of giant limpet populations. Their conspicuously large size makes them the preferred target of human collection. Because they are protandric species, selectively eliminating larger specimens of a given population seriously compromises their viability and has led to local extinction events in some cases. Additionally, sustained collection over time may lead to microevolutionary responses that result in genetic changes. The growing presence of artificial structures in coastal ecosystems may cause population fragmentation and isolation, limiting the genetic flow and dispersion capacity of many limpet species. However, when they are necessitated, artificial structures could be managed to establish marine artificial microreserves and contribute to the conservation of giant limpet species that naturally settle on them.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Elsevier Academic Press Inc Lieu de Publication San Diego Éditeur Curry, B.E.  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé Advances in Marine Biology, Vol 76  
  Volume de collection 76 Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-0-12-812402-4 978-0-12-812401-7 Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2180  
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Auteur Boyd, C.; Grunbaum, D.; Hunt, G.L.; Punt, A.E.; Weimerskirch, H.; Bertrand, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Effects of variation in the abundance and distribution of prey on the foraging success of central place foragers Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Appl. Ecol.  
  Volume 54 Numéro 5 Pages 1362-1372  
  Mots-Clés allocation; ecosystem; fisheries; Guanay Cormorant; guano-producing seabirds; Humboldt Current system; impact; indicators; marine spatial planning; Peruvian Booby; Phalacrocorax bougainvilliorum; predator-prey interactions; prey availability; seabird competition with fisheries; small pelagic fish; Sula variegata; upwelling system; variability  
  Résumé 1. Seabirds and pinnipeds are vulnerable to reductions in prey availability, especially during the breeding season when spatial constraints limit their adaptive capacity. There are growing concerns about the effects of fisheries on prey availability in regions where large commercial fisheries target forage fish. 2. For breeding seabirds and pinnipeds, prey availability depends on a combination of abundance, accessibility, patchiness and distance from the colony. An understanding of the aspects of prey availability that determine foraging success is essential for the design of effective management responses. 3. We used a mechanistic individual-based foraging model based on observed data for two sea-bird species, the Peruvian Booby Sula variegata and Guanay Cormorant Phalacrocorax bougainvilliorum, to simulate the foraging patterns of seabirds feeding on schooling fish. We ran the model over simulated prey fields representing eight possible combinations of high or low prey abundance, shallow or deep prey, and broadly distributed or spatially concentrated prey. 4. The results highlight the importance of the accessibility of prey. Depth distribution was the primary factor determining modelled foraging success for both species, followed by abundance, and then spatial configuration. 5. Synthesis and applications. The individual-based foraging model provides a spatially explicit framework for assessing the effects of fisheries on the foraging success of seabirds and other central place foragers, and for evaluating the potential effectiveness of marine-protected areas and other fisheries management strategies for safeguarding central place foragers in dynamic ecosystems. Our analysis indicates that broad-scale fisheries management strategies that maintain forage fish above critical biomass levels are essential, but may need to be supplemented by targeted actions, such as time-area closures, when environmental conditions lead to low prey abundance or reduce prey accessibility for seabirds or pinnipeds of conservation concern. The individual-based foraging model is adaptable and could be reconfigured for application to other species and systems.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2192  
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