bascule de visibilité Search & Display Options

Tout Sélectionner    Désélectionner
 |   | 
Détails
   print
  Enregistrements Liens
Auteur Boukef, I.; El Bour, M.; Al Gallas, N.; El Bahri, O.; Mejri, S.; Mraouna, R.; Ben Aissa, R.; Boudabous, A.; Got, P.; Troussellier, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Survival of Escherichia coli Strains in Mediterranean Brackish Water in the Bizerte Lagoon in Northern Tunisia Type Article scientifique
  Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée Water Environ Res  
  Volume (down) 82 Numéro 11 Pages 2249-2257  
  Mots-Clés bizerte lagoon; brackish water; coastal waters; cytotoxicity; enteric bacteria; escherichia coli; fecal-coliforms; marine waters; salmonella-typhimurium; seawater microcosms; sewage; shigella-dysenteriae type-1; sunlight; survival; viability; virulence  
  Résumé This study investigated survival and virulence of Escherichia coli strains exposed to natural conditions in brackish water. Two E. coli strains (O126:B16 and O55:B5) were incubated in water microcosms in the Bizerte lagoon in Northern Tunisia and exposed for 12 days to natural sunlight in June (231 to 386 W/m(2), 26 +/- 1 degrees C, 30 g/L) and in April (227 to 330 W/m(2), 17 +/- 1 degrees C, 27 g/L) or maintained in darkness for 21 days (17 +/- 1 degrees C, 27 g/L). The results revealed that sunlight was the most significant inactivating factor (decrease of 3 Ulog within 48 hours for the two strains) compared to salinity and temperature (in darkness). Survival time of the strains was prolonged as they were maintained in darkness. Local strain (E. coli O55:B5) showed better survival capacity (T(90) = 52 hours) than E. coli O126:B16 (T(90) = 11 h). For both, modifications were noted only for some metabolic activities of carbohydrates hydrolysis. Cytotoxicity of the two strains, tested on Vero cell, was maintained during the period of survival. Water Environ. Res., 82, 2249 (2010).  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1061-4303 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 864  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur PLANQUE, B.; FROMENTIN, J.-M.; CURY, P.; DRINKWATER, K.F.; JENNINGS, S.; PERRY, R.I.; KIFANI, S. url  openurl
  Titre How does fishing alter marine populations and ecosystems sensitivity to climate? Type Article scientifique
  Année 2010 Publication Journal of Marine Systems Revue Abrégée  
  Volume (down) 79 Numéro 3-4 Pages 403-417  
  Mots-Clés Resilience; Marine ecosystems; Demography; Climate fishing interactions  
  Résumé Evidence has accumulated that climate variability influences the state and functioning of marine ecosystems. At the same time increasing pressure from exploitation and other human activities has been shown to impact exploited and non-exploited species and potentially modify ecosystem structure. There has been a tendency among marine scientists to pose the question as a dichotomy, i.e., whether (1) “natural” climate variability or (2) fishery exploitation bears the primary responsibility for population declines in fish populations and the associated ecosystem changes. However, effects of both climate and exploitation are probably substantially involved in most cases. More importantly, climate and exploitation interact in their effects, such that climate may cause failure in a fishery management scheme but that fishery exploitation may also disrupt the ability of a resource population to withstand, or adjust to, climate changes. Here, we review how exploitation, by altering the structure of populations and ecosystems, can modify their ability to respond to climate. The demographic effects of fishing (removal of large-old individuals) can have substantial consequences on the capacity of populations to buffer climate variability through various pathways (direct demographic effects, effects on migration, parental effects). In a similar way, selection of population sub-units within metapopulations may also lead to a reduction in the capacity of populations to withstand climate variability and change. At the ecosystem level, reduced complexity by elimination of species, such as might occur by fishing, may be destabilizing and could lead to reduced resilience to perturbations. Differential exploitation of marine resources could also promote increased turnover rates in marine ecosystems, which would exacerbate the effects of environmental changes. Overall (and despite the specificities of local situations) reduction in marine diversity at the individual, population and ecosystem levels will likely lead to a reduction in the resilience and an increase in the response of populations and ecosystems to future climate variability and change. Future management schemes will have to consider the structure and functioning of populations and ecosystems in a wider sense in order to maximise the ability of marine fauna to adapt to future climates. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.  
  Adresse Univ E Anglia, Sch Environm Sci, Norwich NR4 7TJ, Norfolk, England.  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Elsevier Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0924-7963 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ 7384 collection 1025  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Blanchet, M.; Pringault, O.; Panagiotopoulos, C.; Lefevre, D.; Charriere, B.; Ghiglione, J.-F.; Fernandez, C.; Aparicio, F.L.; Marrase, C.; Catala, P.; Oriol, L.; Caparros, J.; Joux, F. doi  openurl
  Titre When riverine dissolved organic matter (DOM) meets labile DOM in coastal waters: changes in bacterial community activity and composition Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquat. Sci.  
  Volume (down) 79 Numéro 1 Pages 27-43  
  Mots-Clés Bacterial community composition; bacterioplankton; biodegradation; carbon; coastal waters; Dissolved organic matter; Fluorescence; growth efficiency; lake water; marine; Mediterranean Sea; open-ocean; Priming effect; rhone river; terrestrial  
  Résumé Heterotrophic bacterial communities in marine environments are exposed to a heterogeneous mixture of dissolved organic compounds with different bioreactivity that may control both their activity and composition. The coastal environment is an example of a mixing area where recalcitrant allochthonous organic matter from rivers can encounter labile organic matter from marine phytoplanktonic blooms. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of mixed qualities of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on bacterial community activity (BCA) and bacterial community composition (BCC) and to test for a priming effect when DOM sources are added in combination. Coastal marine bacterial communities were incubated separately with a mixture of amino acids and with natural riverine DOM or with both sources together for 42 days. Addition of amino acids alone or in combination with riverine DOM led to a similar stimulation of BCA compared to control condition, whereas addition of riverine DOM alone did not modify BCA compared to the control. On the contrary, BCC analyzed by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was not affected by the addition of amino acids alone, but changed dramatically with riverine DOM alone or in combination with amino acids. Our results show that changes in BCA and BCC can be driven by different types of DOM, but that these changes are not necessarily coupled. Moreover, the addition of labile DOM did not modify the microbial decomposition of riverine DOM, nor the BCC, suggesting that a priming effect did not occur under these experimental conditions.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1015-1621 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2090  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Jimenez, H.; Dumas, P.; Mouillot, D.; Bigot, L.; Ferraris, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Harvesting effects on functional structure and composition of tropical invertebrate assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée ICES J. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume (down) 73 Numéro 2 Pages 420-428  
  Mots-Clés Bta; marine protected areas; shellfishing; species composition; tropical benthos  
  Résumé Anthropogenic disturbances affect ecosystem structure and functioning. The quantification of their impacts on highly diverse and structurally complex ecosystems, such as coral reefs, is challenging. These communities are facing rising fishing pressure, particularly on Pacific Islands such as New Caledonia. The main objective was to quantify harvesting effects on invertebrate assemblages across two contrasting habitats (soft- and hard-bottom), by comparing communities in marine protected areas (MPAs) with non-MPAs using 10 biological and ecological traits. Patterns of trait composition were compared with those of species composition by non-metric multidimensional scaling and permutational analysis of variance analyses. Traits most responsible for differences between MPAs and non-MPAs were determined using SIMPER analysis, and predictions on shellfishing effects were discussed. A total of 248 species were recorded in hard-bottom communities, mainly characterized by mobile epifauna living on corals, crawling, and possessing a shell (molluscs) or a cuticle (crabs and echinoderms). Soft-bottom habitats contained 166 species, dominated by burrowing and sedentary species, especially shelled (largely bivalves) and worm-like organisms. Clear differences in species and trait composition between MPA and non-MPAs were highlighted in both habitats. Harvesting activities have community-wide effects that change the functional composition of invertebrate assemblages, in particular in terms of living habits and mobility. The observed shifts in benthic communities can affect the functioning of tropical coastal ecosystems and need to be included in small-scale fisheries management in poorly known tropical environments.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1054-3139, 1095-9289 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1535  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Garrido, M.; Cecchi, P.; Vaquer, A.; Pasqualini, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Effects of sample conservation on assessments of the photosynthetic efficiency of phytoplankton using PAM fluorometry Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part I-Oceanogr. Res. Pap.  
  Volume (down) 71 Numéro Pages 38-48  
  Mots-Clés diatom, quantum yield, temperature, parameters; PAM fluorescence, Phytoplankton, Temperature Biguglia lagoon; physiological-responses, marine-phytoplankton, oxygen evolution, benthic; rapid light curves, chlorophyll-a fluorescence, in-vivo,  
  Résumé Pulse Amplitude Modulated (PAM) fluorometry is now a widely used method for the assessment of phytoplankton fitness, with an increasing popularity in field assessments. It is usually recommended to carry out measurements swiftly after collection, but the number of samples and analytical procedures needed to obtain valuable datasets sometimes makes immediate analysis impracticable, forcing delays between fluorescence measurements. Conservation conditions of samples before analysis may potentially affect their photosynthetic performances but no formal study documenting such impacts appears available in the literature. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of storage conditions (temperature, duration) on photosynthetic parameters in different phytoplankton communities (characterized in situ by a BBE fluoroprobe) sampled during summer in different environmental locations in a Mediterranean lagoon (Biguglia lagoon, Corsica, France). PAM-fluorescence parameters were measured after three different conservation durations (2-4 h, 6-8 h and 10-12 h after collection) on samples stored at three different temperatures (15 degrees C, 25 degrees C and 35 degrees C). Results showed that storage at the highest temperature severely impacted photosynthetic parameters, with cumulative effects as storage duration increased. For phytoplankton samples collected in warm or tropical environments, storage at “room temperature” (25 degrees C) only appeared a valid option if measurements have to be carried out strictly within a very short delay. Inversely, cooling the samples (i.e. conservation at 15 degrees C) did not induce significant effects, independently of storage duration. Cooling appeared the best solution when sampling-to-analysis delay goes over a few hours. Long-term storage ( > 8 h) should definitively be avoided. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0637 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 552  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
Tout Sélectionner    Désélectionner
 |   | 
Détails
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: