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Auteur Jaquemet, S.; Ternon, J.-F.; Kaehler, S.; Thiebot, J.B.; Dyer, B.; Bemanaja, E.; Marteau, C.; Le Corre, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Contrasted structuring effects of mesoscale features on the seabird community in the Mozambique Channel Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Research Part II.Topical Studies in Oceanography  
  Volume (down) 100 Numéro No spécial Pages 200-211  
  Mots-Clés Foraging habitats; Frigatebird; Marine productivity; Mesoscale eddies; Red-footed booby; Sooty tern; Tropical marine predators; Tuna; Western Indian Ocean  
  Résumé The Mozambique Channel (western Indian Ocean) is a dynamic environment characterised by strong mesoscale features, which influence all biological components of the pelagic ecosystem. We investigated the distribution, abundance and feeding behaviour of seabirds in the Mozambique Channel in relation to physical and biological environmental variables, with a specific interest in mesoscale features. Seabird censuses were conducted in summer and winter during 7 cruises in the southern and northern Mozambique Channel. Tropical species accounted for 49% of the 37 species identified and 97% of the individuals, and species from the sub-Antarctic region constituted 30% of the identifications. The typically tropical sooty tern (Onychoprion fuscata) was the dominant species during all cruises, and overall accounted for 74% of the species observations and 85% of counted birds. Outputs of Generalised Linear Models at the scale of the Mozambique Channel suggested that higher densities of flying and feeding birds occurred in areas with lower sea surface temperatures and lower surface chlorophyll a concentrations. Most of the flocks of feeding birds did not associate with surface schools of fish or marine mammals, but when they did, these flocks were larger, especially when associated with tuna. While tropical species seemed to favour cyclonic eddies, frontal and divergence zones, non-tropical species were more frequently recorded over shelf waters. Sooty terns foraged preferentially in cyclonic eddies where zooplankton, micronelcton and tuna schools were abundant. Among other major tropical species, frigatebirds (Fregata spp.) predominated in frontal zones between eddies, where tuna schools also frequently occurred and where geostrophic currents were the strongest. Red-footed boobies (Sula sub) concentrated in divergence zones characterised by low sea level anomalies, low geostrophic currents, and high zooplanlcton biomass close to the surface. Our results highlight the importance of mescoscale features in structuring the tropical seabird community in the Mozambique Channel, in addition to segregating tropical and non-tropical species. The mechanisms underlying the segregation of tropical seabirds seem to partially differ from that of other tropical regions, and this may be a consequence of the strong local mesoscale activity, affecting prey size and availability schemes. Beyond characterising the foraging habitats of the seabird community of the Mozambique Channel, this study highlights the importance of this region as a hot spot for seabirds; especially the southern part, where several endangered sub-Antarctic species over-winter.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur Barlow, R.; Marsac, F.; Ternon, J.-F.; Roberts, M.  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 363  
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Auteur Bodin, N.; Chassot, E.; Sardenne, F.; Zudaire, I.; Grande, M.; Dhurmeea, Z.; Murua, H.; Barde, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Ecological data for western Indian Ocean tuna Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology  
  Volume (down) 99 Numéro 5 Pages 1245-1245  
  Mots-Clés energetics; fatty acids; lipids; morphometrics; multi-tissues; proteins; stable isotopes; trophic ecology; tropical marine ecosystems; tuna fisheries  
  Résumé Tuna are marine apex predators that inhabit the tropical and sub-tropical waters of the Indian Ocean where they support socially and economically important fisheries. Key component of pelagic communities, tuna are bioindicator species of anthropogenic and climate-induced changes through modifications of the structure and related energy-flow of food webs and ecosystems. The IndianEcoTuna dataset provides a panel of ecological tracers measured in four soft tissues (white muscle, red muscle, liver, gonads) from 1,364 individuals of four species, i.e., the albacore (ALB, Thunnus alalunga), the bigeye (BET, T. obesus), the skipjack (SKJ, Katsuwomus pelamis), and the yellowfin (YFT, T. albacares), collected throughout the western Indian Ocean from 2009 to 2015. Sampling was carried out during routine monitoring programs, at sea by observers onboard professional vessels or at landing. For each record, the type of fishing gear, the conservation mode, as well as the fishing date and catch location are provided. Individuals were sampled to span a wide range of body sizes: 565 ALB with fork length from 58 to 118 cm, 155 BET from 29.5 to 173 cm, 304 SKJ from 30 to 74 cm, and 340 YFT from 29 to 171.5 cm. The IndianEcoTuna dataset combines: (1) 9,512 records of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes (percent element weights, δ13C and δ15N values) in 1,185 fish, (2) 887 concentrations of total proteins in 242 fish, (3) 8,356 concentrations of total lipids and three lipid classes (triacylglycerols TAG; phospholipids PL; sterols ST) in 695 fish, and (4) 1,150 and 1,033 profiles of neutral and polar fatty acids in 397 and 342 fish, respectively. Information on sex and weights of the whole fish, gonads, liver and stomach is provided. Because of the essential trophic role and wide-ranging of tuna in marine systems, and the large panel of tropho-energetic tracers and derived-key quantitative parameters provided (e.g., niche width, trophic position, condition indices), the IndianEcoTuna dataset should be of high interest for global and regional research on marine trophic ecology and food web analysis, as well as on the impacts of anthropogenic changes on Indian Ocean marine ecosystems. There are no copyright restrictions for research and/or teaching purposes. Usage of the dataset must include citation of this Data Paper.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1939-9170 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2373  
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Auteur Oppel, S.; Bolton, M.; Carneiro, A.P.B.; Dias, M.P.; Green, J.A.; Masello, J.F.; Phillips, R.A.; Owen, E.; Quillfeldt, P.; Beard, A.; Bertrand, S.; Blackburn, J.; Boersma, P.D.; Borges, A.; Broderick, A.C.; Catry, P.; Cleasby, I.; Clingham, E.; Creuwels, J.; Crofts, S.; Cuthbert, R.J.; Dallmeijer, H.; Davies, D.; Davies, R.; Dilley, B.J.; Dinis, H.A.; Dossa, J.; Dunn, M.J.; Efe, M.A.; Fayet, A.L.; Figueiredo, L.; Frederico, A.P.; Gjerdrum, C.; Godley, B.J.; Granadeiro, J.P.; Guilford, T.; Hamer, K.C.; Hazin, C.; Hedd, A.; Henry, L.; Hernández-Montero, M.; Hinke, J.; Kokubun, N.; Leat, E.; Tranquilla, L.M.F.; Metzger, B.; Militão, T.; Montrond, G.; Mullié, W.; Padget, O.; Pearmain, E.J.; Pollet, I.L.; Pütz, K.; Quintana, F.; Ratcliffe, N.; Ronconi, R.A.; Ryan, P.G.; Saldanha, S.; Shoji, A.; Sim, J.; Small, C.; Soanes, L.; Takahashi, A.; Trathan, P.; Trivelpiece, W.; Veen, J.; Wakefield, E.; Weber, N.; Weber, S.; Zango, L.; Daunt, F.; Ito, M.; Harris, M.P.; Newell, M.A.; Wanless, S.; González-Solís, J.; Croxall, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Spatial scales of marine conservation management for breeding seabirds Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Policy  
  Volume (down) 98 Numéro Pages 37-46  
  Mots-Clés Foraging range; Marine protected area; Spatial aggregation; Telemetry; Tracking; Value of information  
  Résumé Knowing the spatial scales at which effective management can be implemented is fundamental for conservation planning. This is especially important for mobile species, which can be exposed to threats across large areas, but the space use requirements of different species can vary to an extent that might render some management approaches inefficient. Here the space use patterns of seabirds were examined to provide guidance on whether conservation management approaches should be tailored for taxonomic groups with different movement characteristics. Seabird tracking data were synthesised from 5419 adult breeding individuals of 52 species in ten families that were collected in the Atlantic Ocean basin between 1998 and 2017. Two key aspects of spatial distribution were quantified, namely how far seabirds ranged from their colony, and to what extent individuals from the same colony used the same areas at sea. There was evidence for substantial differences in patterns of space-use among the ten studied seabird families, indicating that several alternative conservation management approaches are needed. Several species exhibited large foraging ranges and little aggregation at sea, indicating that area-based conservation solutions would have to be extremely large to adequately protect such species. The results highlight that short-ranging and aggregating species such as cormorants, auks, some penguins, and gulls would benefit from conservation approaches at relatively small spatial scales during their breeding season. However, improved regulation of fisheries, bycatch, pollution and other threats over large spatial scales will be needed for wide-ranging and dispersed species such as albatrosses, petrels, storm petrels and frigatebirds.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0308-597x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2454  
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Auteur Rossi, F.; Baeta, A.; Marques, J.C. doi  openurl
  Titre Stable isotopes reveal habitat-related diet shifts in facultative deposit-feeders Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Sea Res.  
  Volume (down) 95 Numéro Pages 172-179  
  Mots-Clés Benthos; burying depth; carbon; Estuaries; estuarine habitats; food-web; Macrofauna; marine; polychaete nereis-diversicolor; scrobicularia-plana; Seagrass; seagrass meadows; Sediment; water-flow; zostera-noltii  
  Résumé Seagrass patches interspersed in a sediment matrix may vary environmental conditions and affect feeding habits of consumers and food-web structure. This paper investigates diet shifts between bare sediments and a Zostera noltei (Hornemann, 1832) meadow for three facultative deposit-feeding macrofaunal consumers, notably the bivalve Scrobicularia piano (da Costa, 1778), the polychaete Hediste diversicolor (O.T. Muller, 1776), and the gastropod Hydrobia ulvae (Pennant, 1778). In July 2008, one eelgrass meadow and two bare sediment locations were chosen in the Mondego estuary (40 degrees 08" N, 8 degrees 50'W, Portugal) and sampled for stable isotope signatures (delta C-13 and delta N-15) of macrofauna consumers and some of their potential basal food sources, such as sedimentary organic matter (SOM), microphytobenthos (MPB), seagrass shoots, leaves and seaweeds laying on the surface sediment. The delta N-15 of H. diversicolor was 3% higher in the eelgrass meadow than in bare sediment, indicating a change of trophic position, whereas the Bayesian stable-isotope mixing model showed that S. piano assimilated more macroalgal detritus than microphytobenthos in the eelgrass bed. Such habitat-related diet shifts have the potential to change structure and spatial dynamics of benthic food webs. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1385-1101 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1549  
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Auteur Clavier, J.; Chauvaud, L.; Carlier, A.; Amice, E.; van der Geest, M.; Labrosse, P.; Diagne, A.; Hily, C. url  openurl
  Titre Aerial and underwater carbon metabolism of a Zostera noltii seagrass bed in the Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania Type Article scientifique
  Année 2011 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquatic Botany  
  Volume (down) 95 Numéro Pages 24-30  
  Mots-Clés Zostera noltii Seagrass Metabolism Intertidal Respiration Primary production Africa Isotope wadden sea marine angiosperms seasonal-variation coastal lagoon hornem photosynthesis oxygen respiration dynamics dioxide  
  Résumé Community respiration and primary production were measured in a dense intertidal Zostera noltii bed on the Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania (West Africa) under aerial and submerged conditions. Metabolism was studied in situ in dark and transparent benthic chambers. CO(2) fluxes in the air were measured over a series of short-term incubations (3 min) using an infrared gas analyzer. Dissolved inorganic carbon fluxes were calculated from concentration changes during one-hour underwater incubations. Air and underwater irradiance levels were measured every minute throughout the experiments. Carbon respiration was lower in the air (2.2 mmol m(-2) h(-1)) than underwater (5.0 mmol m(-2) h(-1)); similarly, a production-irradiance model fitted to the data indicated that gross maximal photosynthetic rate was markedly lower during emergence (6.0 mmol C m(-2) h(-1)) than under water (42.7 mmol C m(-2) h(-1)). The delta(13)C values observed in shoots indicated a decrease in atmospheric CO(2) contribution, compared to dissolved inorganic carbon, in Z. noltii metabolism along a depth gradient within a single location. As the seagrass bed remains under a thin layer of water at low tide at the studied site, the large difference in primary production can be mainly attributed to photosynthesis inhibition by high pH and oxygen concentration, as well as to the negative feedback of self-shading by seagrass leaves during emersion. The observed differences in respiration can be explained by the oxygen deficit at night during low tide near the sediment surface, a deficit that is consistent with the abundance of anoxia-tolerant species. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.  
  Adresse [Clavier, Jacques] IUEM, CNRS, UMR 6539, LEMAR,Lab Sci Environm Marin, F-29280 Plouzane, France. [Van der Geest, Matthijs] NIOZ, Dept Marine Ecol, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Netherlands. [Labrosse, Pierre; Diagne, Ahmed] IMROP, Nouadhibou, Mauritania. Clavier, J (reprint author), IUEM, CNRS, UMR 6539, LEMAR,Lab Sci Environm Marin, Pl Nicolas Copernic, F-29280 Plouzane, France. Jacques.Clavier@univ-brest.fr  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3770 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes ISI Document Delivery No.: 781BF Times Cited: 2 Cited Reference Count: 72 Clavier, Jacques Chauvaud, Laurent Carlier, Antoine Amice, Erwan Van der Geest, Matthijs Labrosse, Pierre Diagne, Ahmed Hily, Christian Franco-Mauritanian PACOBA project; Oceanographic and Fisheries Research Mauritanian Institute (IMROP); Banc d'Arguin National Park (PNBA) This study was funded by the Franco-Mauritanian PACOBA project. We thank the Oceanographic and Fisheries Research Mauritanian Institute (IMROP) and the Banc d'Arguin National Park (PNBA) for their support. Elsevier science bv Amsterdam Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ 847 collection 1369  
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