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Auteur Thebaud, O.; Innes, J.; Doyen, L.; Lample, M.; Macher, C.; Mahevas, S.; Mullon, C.; Planque, B.; Quaas, M.; Smith, T.; Vermard, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Building ecological-economic models and scenarios of marine resource systems : workshop report Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication (down) Revue Abrégée Marine Policy  
  Volume 43 Numéro Pages 382-386  
  Mots-Clés Ecological-Economic Modelling; ecosystem approach; Integrated Assessment; Marine Resources  
  Résumé As part of the ecosystem approach to managing fisheries and other uses of marine ecosystems, there has been a growing call for the development of integrated assessment tools to support the provision of both tactical and strategic management advice. Of particular importance in this domain is the development of models that capture the dynamic interactions between social and economic systems, and marine ecosystems. In February 2013, a workshop jointly organised by the ICES working group on Integrative, Physical biological and Ecosystem Modelling and researchers attending the “Mathematics of Bio-economics” initiative, a contribution to the international event “Mathematics of Planet Earth 2013”, brought together experts to discuss recent advances and key methodological challenges posed by this field of research. The manuscript provides a brief report of the key points discussed during the workshop, including identification of the research which may help progress both the development of these modelling approaches and their application to actual management decision problems.  
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  ISSN 0308-597x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 277  
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Auteur Coz, R.; Ouisse, V.; Artero, C.; Carpentier, A.; Crave, A.; Feunteun, E.; Olivier, J.M.; Perrin, B.; Ysnel, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Development of a new standardised method for sustainable monitoring of the vulnerable pink sea fan Eunicella verrucosa Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication (down) Revue Abrégée Marine Biology  
  Volume 159 Numéro 6 Pages 1375-1388  
  Mots-Clés atlantic canada; cavolini coelenterata octocorallia; channel; gonadal development; gorgonian paramuricea-clavata; marine invertebrate; mediterranean-sea; modular growth; movement; northeast; singularis esper; water  
  Résumé The aim of this survey was to test a standardised method to follow the demographic evolution of a dense aggregative 'forest' population of the temperate gorgonian Eunicella verrucosa (Octocorallia, Gorgoniidae) using in situ photographic recordings. Distribution, density, growth and demographic evolution of the colonies was compared along two parallel transects. Computer treatment allowed the estimation of the total branch fan surface area, and the individual growth of tagged colonies was determined by measuring the increase in this surface area, using consecutive photographs taken at two-year intervals. To integrate the potential bias of branch overlapping, we proposed a correction factor between the in situ photographic surface area and the surface area of the gorgonian calculated from ex situ photographic surface area with all branches deployed. The surface-frequency distribution of colonies was converted to estimated-age-frequency distribution using an estimated growth curve based on the net growth rate. The technique used revealed significant differences in population structure and the dynamics of gorgonian colonies, as the two transects appeared to be influenced by different environmental conditions. The recruitment also seemed to vary according to year and transect, resulting in different densities. Our work showed clear results in characterising the variations of gorgonian demographic evolution at a small spatial scale; thus, it is assumed that this method could be a sustainable tool for coastal environmental managers.  
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  ISSN 0025-3162 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 539  
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Auteur Travers, M.; Shin, Y.-J.; Jennings, S.; Machu, E.; Huggett, J.A.; Field, J.G.; Cury, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Two-way coupling versus one-way forcing of plankton and fish models to predict ecosystem changes in the Benguela Type Article scientifique
  Année 2009 Publication (down) Revue Abrégée Ecological Modelling  
  Volume 220 Numéro 21 Pages 3089-3099  
  Mots-Clés Benguela upwelling; Ecem 07; End-to-end approach; food web; marine; Marine ecosystem model coupling; Predation  
  Résumé 'End-to-end' models have been adopted in an attempt to capture more of the processes that influence the ecology of marine ecosystems and to make system wide predictions of the effects of fishing and climate change. Here, we develop an end-to-end model by coupling existing models that describe the dynamics of low (ROMS-N(2)P(2)Z(2)D(2)) and high trophic levels(OSMOSE). ROMS-N(2)P(2)Z(2)D(2) is a biogeochemical model representing phytoplankton and zooplankton seasonal dynamics forced by hydrodynamics in the Benguela upwelling ecosystem. OSMOSE is an individual-based model representing the dynamics of several species of fish, linked through opportunistic and size-based trophic interactions. The models are coupled through a two-way size-based predation process. Plankton provides prey for fish, and the effects of predation by fish on the plankton are described by a plankton mortality term that is variable in space and time. Using the end-to-end model, we compare the effects of two-way coupling versus one-way forcing of the fish model with the plankton biomass field. The fish-induced mortality on plankton is temporally variable, in part explained by seasonal changes in fish biomass. Inclusion of two-way feedback affects the seasonal dynamics of plankton groups and usually reduces the amplitude of variation in abundance (top-down effect). Forcing and coupling lead to different predicted food web structures owing to changes in the dominant food chain which is supported by plankton (bottom-up effect). Our comparisons of one-way forcing and two-way coupling show how feedbacks may affect abundance, food web structure and food web function and emphasise the need to critically examine the consequences of different model architectures when seeking to predict the effects of fishing and climate change.  
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  ISSN 0304-3800 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 29  
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Auteur Pellissier, L.; Leprieur, F.; Parravicini, V.; Cowman, P.F.; Kulbicki, M.; Litsios, G.; Olsen, S.M.; Wisz, M.S.; Bellwood, D.R.; Mouillot, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Quaternary coral reef refugia preserved fish diversity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication (down) Revue Abrégée Science  
  Volume 344 Numéro 6187 Pages 1016-1019  
  Mots-Clés abundance; areas; assembly rules; cradles; global patterns; gradient; hotspots; marine biodiversity; museums; species richness  
  Résumé The most prominent pattern in global marine biogeography is the biodiversity peak in the Indo-Australian Archipelago. Yet the processes that underpin this pattern are still actively debated. By reconstructing global marine paleoenvironments over the past 3 million years on the basis of sediment cores, we assessed the extent to which Quaternary climate fluctuations can explain global variation in current reef fish richness. Comparing global historical coral reef habitat availability with the present-day distribution of 6316 reef fish species, we find that distance from stable coral reef habitats during historical periods of habitat loss explains 62% of the variation in fish richness, outweighing present-day environmental factors. Our results highlight the importance of habitat persistence during periods of climate change for preserving marine biodiversity.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 801  
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Auteur Moffitt, E.A.; Botsford, L.W.; Kaplan, D.; O'Farrell, M.R. url  openurl
  Titre Marine reserve networks for species that move within a home range Type Article scientifique
  Année 2009 Publication (down) Revue Abrégée Ecological Applications  
  Volume 19 Numéro 7 Pages 1835-1847  
  Mots-Clés adult movement; dispersal per recruit; fisheries; home range; marine; marine reserves; protected areas; spillover; sustainability; yield  
  Résumé Marine reserves are expected to benefit a wide range of species, but most models used to evaluate their effects assume that adults are sedentary, thereby potentially overestimating population persistence. Many nearshore marine organisms move within a home range as adults, and there is a need to understand the effects of this type of movement on reserve performance. We incorporated movement within a home range into a spatially explicit marine reserve model in order to assess the combined effects of adult and larval movement on persistence and yield in a general, strategic framework. We describe how the capacity of a population to persist decreased with increasing home range size in a manner that depended on whether the sedentary case was maintained by self persistence or network persistence. Self persistence declined gradually with increasing home range and larval dispersal distance, while network persistence decreased sharply to 0 above a threshold home range and was less dependent on larval dispersal distance. The maximum home range size protected by a reserve network increased with the fraction of coastline in reserves and decreasing exploitation rates outside reserves. Spillover due to movement within a home range contributed to yield moderately under certain conditions, although yield contributions were generally not as large as those from spillover due to larval dispersal. Our results indicate that, for species exhibiting home range behavior, persistence in a network of marine reserves may be more predictable than previously anticipated from models based solely on larval dispersal, in part due to better knowledge of home range sizes. Including movement within a home range can change persistence results significantly from those assuming that adults are sedentary; hence it is an important consideration in reserve design.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 34  
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