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Auteur (up) GASCUEL, D.; COLL, M.; FOX, C.; GUENETTE, S.; GUITTON, J.; KENNY, A.; KNITTWEIS, L.; NIELSEN, J.R.; PIET, G.; RAID, T.; TRAVERS-TROLET, M.; SHEPHARD, S.
Titre Fishing impact and environmental status in European seas: a diagnosis from stock assessments and ecosystem indicators Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Fish And Fisheries
Volume 17 Numéro 1 Pages 31-55
Mots-Clés Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management; Ecosystem indicators; Good Environmental Status; Marine Strategy Framework Directive; stock assessment; trophic level
Résumé Stock-based and ecosystem-based indicators are used to provide a new diagnosis of the fishing impact and environmental status of European seas. In the seven European marine ecosystems covering the Baltic and the North-east Atlantic, (i) trends in landings since 1950 were examined; (ii) syntheses of the status and trends in fish stocks were consolidated at the ecosystem level; and (iii) trends in ecosystem indicators based on landings and surveys were analysed. We show that yields began to decrease everywhere (except in the Baltic) from the mid-1970s, as a result of the over-exploitation of some major stocks. Fishermen adapted by increasing fishing effort and exploiting a wider part of the ecosystems. This was insufficient to compensate for the decrease in abundance of many stocks, and total landings have halved over the last 30 years. The highest fishing impact took place in the late 1990s, with a clear decrease in stock-based and ecosystem indicators. In particular, trophic-based indicators exhibited a continuous decreasing trend in almost all ecosystems. Over the past decade, a decrease in fishing pressure has been observed, the mean fishing mortality rate of assessed stocks being almost halved in all the considered ecosystems, but no clear recovery in the biomass and ecosystem indicators is yet apparent. In addition, the mean recruitment index was shown to decrease by around 50% in all ecosystems (except the Baltic). We conclude that building this kind of diagnosis is a key step on the path to implementing an ecosystem approach to fisheries management
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ISSN 1467-2960 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1515
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Auteur (up) Gerigny, O.; Brun, M.; Fabri, M.C.; Tomasino, C.; Le Moigne, M.; Jadaud, A.; Galgani, F.
Titre Seafloor litter from the continental shelf and canyons in French Mediterranean Water: Distribution, typologies and trends Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Pollut. Bull.
Volume 146 Numéro Pages 653-666
Mots-Clés abundance; adriatic sea; areas; benthic marine litter; Canyon; Corsica; gulf; Gulf of Lion; impacts; macro; Marine litter; Mediterranean Sea; northern; plastic debris; Seafloor; strategy
Résumé Seafloor litter has been studied both on the continental shelves (by trawling during 24 years) and in canyons (by ROV) of the French Mediterranean sea Water (FMW). On the continental shelf, mean densities range from 49.63 to 289.01 items/km(2). The most abundant categories were plastic, glass/ceramics, metals and textiles. Trend analysis shows a significant increase in plastic quantities during the study period. Plastics accumulate at all depths, with heavier items being found in deeper areas, while the continental slope-break appears as a clean area. The spatial distribution of litter revealed the influence of geomorphologic factors, anthropic activities, shipping route, river inputs. All the canyons are affected by debris but coastal canyons (Ligurian Sea and Corsica) were more impacted than offshore canyons in the Gulf of Lion. The FMW appears to be highly polluted with regard to values found in other areas, but lower than those observed in the Eastern Mediterranean.
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ISSN 0025-326x ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000488999000075 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2651
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Auteur (up) Giakoumi, S.; Guilhaumon, F.; Kark, S.; Terlizzi, A.; Claudet, J.; Felline, S.; Cerrano, C.; Coll, M.; Danovaro, R.; Fraschetti, S.; Koutsoubas, D.; Ledoux, J.-B.; Mazor, T.; Mérigot, B.; Micheli, F.; Katsanevakis, S.
Titre Space invaders; biological invasions in marine conservation planning Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Divers. Distrib.
Volume 22 Numéro 12 Pages 1220-1231
Mots-Clés alien species; biodiversity; biological invasions; coastal; conservation planning; cost; diversity; ecosystem; impacts; management actions; marine biogeographic regions; marine protected areas; Mediterranean Sea; pathways; protected areas; strategy
Résumé AimBiological invasions are major contributors to global change and native biodiversity decline. However, they are overlooked in marine conservation plans. Here, we examine for the first time the extent to which marine conservation planning research has addressed (or ignored) biological invasions. Furthermore, we explore the change of spatial priorities in conservation plans when different approaches are used to incorporate the presence and impacts of invasive species. LocationGlobal analysis with a focus on the Mediterranean Sea region. MethodsWe conducted a systematic literature review consisting of three steps: (1) article selection using a search engine, (2) abstract screening and (3) review of pertinent articles, which were identified in the second step. The information extracted included the scale and geographical location of each case study as well as the approach followed regarding invasive species. We also applied the software Marxan to produce and compare conservation plans for the Mediterranean Sea that either protect, or avoid areas impacted by invasives, or ignore the issue. One case study focused on the protection of critical habitats, and the other on endemic fish species. ResultsWe found that of 119 papers on marine spatial plans in specific biogeographic regions, only three (2.5%) explicitly took into account invasive species. When comparing the different conservation plans for each case study, we found that the majority of selected sites for protection (ca. 80%) changed in the critical habitat case study, while this proportion was lower but substantial (27%) in the endemic fish species case study. Main conclusionsBiological invasions are being widely disregarded when planning for conservation in the marine environment across local to global scales. More explicit consideration of biological invasions can significantly alter spatial conservation priorities. Future conservation plans should explicitly account for biological invasions to optimize the selection of marine protected areas.
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ISSN 1366-9516 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1704
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Auteur (up) Goetze, J.; Langlois, T.; Claudet, J.; Januchowski-Hartley, F.; Jupiter, S.D.
Titre Periodically harvested closures require full protection of vulnerable species and longer closure periods Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Conserv.
Volume 203 Numéro Pages 67-74
Mots-Clés areas; biomass; Fiji; Fisheries management; life-history; Locally managed marine areas; Marine conservation; marine reserves; predatory fish; Recovery; reef fish communities; responses; small-scale fisheries; stereo-video; vulnerability
Résumé Periodically harvested closures (PHCs) are small fisheries closures with objectives such as sustaining fisheries and conserving biodiversity and have become one of the most common forms of nearshore marine management in the Western Pacific. Although PHCs can provide both short-term conservation and fisheries benefits, their potential as a long-term management strategy remains unclear. Through empirical assessment of a single harvest event in each of five PHCs, we determined whether targeted fishes that differ in their vulnerability to fishing recovered to pre-harvest conditions (the state prior to last harvest) and demonstrated post-harvest recovery benefits after 1 year of re-closure. For low and moderately vulnerable species, two PHCs provided significant pre-harvest benefits and one provided significant post-harvest recovery benefits, suggesting a contribution to longer-term sustainability. PHCs with a combination of high compliance and longer closing times are more likely to provide fisheries benefits and recover from harvest events, however, no benefits were observed across any PHCs for highly vulnerable species. We recommend PHCs have longer closure periods before being harvested and species that are highly vulnerable to fishing (e.g. large species of; grouper, wrasse and parrotfish) are avoided during harvests to avoid overexploitation and increase the sustainability of small-scale fisheries. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1695
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Auteur (up) Goetze, J.S.; Claudet, J.; Januchowski-Hartley, F.; Langlois, T.J.; Wilson, S.K.; White, C.; Weeks, R.; Jupiter, S.D.
Titre Demonstrating multiple benefits from periodically harvested fisheries closures Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Appl. Ecol.
Volume 55 Numéro 3 Pages 1102-1113
Mots-Clés analytical framework; conservation; coral-reef fishes; customary management; fisheries management; food security; locally managed marine areas; long-term; management; marine protected areas; marine reserve; matter; meta-analysis; metaanalysis; partially protected areas; periodically harvested closures; populations; reserves; small-scale fisheries; video
Résumé 1. Periodically harvested closures (PHCs) are one of the most common forms of fisheries management in Melanesia, demonstrating multiple objectives, including sustaining fish stocks and increasing catch efficiency to support small-scale fisheries. No studies have comprehensively assessed their ability to provide short-term fisheries benefits across the entire harvest regime. 2. We present a novel analytical framework to guide a meta-analysis and assist future research in conceptualizing and assessing the potential of PHCs to deliver benefits for multiple fisheries-related objectives. 3. Ten PHCs met our selection criteria and on average, they provided a 48% greater abundance and 92% greater biomass of targeted fishes compared with areas open to fishing prior to being harvested. 4. This translated into tangible harvest benefits, with fishers removing 21% of the abundance and 49% of the biomass within PHCs, resulting in few post-harvest protection benefits. 5. When PHCs are larger, closed for longer periods or well enforced, short-term fisheries benefits are improved. However, an increased availability of fish within PHCs leads to greater removal during harvests. 6. Synthesis and applications. Periodically harvested closures (PHCs) can provide short-term fisheries benefits. Use of the analytical framework presented here will assist in determining long-term fisheries and conservation benefits. We recommend PHCs be closed to fishing for as long as possible, be as large as possible, that compliance be encouraged via community engagement and enforcement, and strict deadlines/goals for harvesting set to prevent overfishing.
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ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2345
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