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Auteur (up) Cruaud, P.; Decker, C.; Olu, K.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Papot, C.; Le Baut, J.; Vigneron, A.; Khripounoff, A.; Gayet, N.; Cathalot, C.; Caprais, J.-C.; Pignet, P.; Godfroy, A.; Cambon-Bonavita, M.-A. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecophysiological differences between vesicomyid species and metabolic capabilities of their symbionts influence distribution patterns of the deep-sea clams Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Evol. Persp.  
  Volume 40 Numéro 3 Pages e12541  
  Mots-Clés calyptogena-magnifica; chemoautotrophic bacteria; cold seeps; community structure; deep-sea ecosystems; evolutionary relationships; guaymas basin; Guaymas Basin; gulf-of-california; hydrothermal vent clam; macrofaunal communities; marine ecology; pliocardinae bivalve; sulfide-rich sediments; sulfur storage; vesicomyid movements  
  Résumé This study provides an analysis of vesicomyid bivalve-symbiont community distribution across cold seep and hydrothermal vent areas in the Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California, Mexico). Using a combination of morphological and molecular approaches including fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and electronic microscopy observations, vesicomyid clam species and their associated symbionts were characterized and results were analyzed in light of geochemical conditions and other on-site observations. A greater diversity of vesicomyids was found at cold seep areas, where three different species were present (Phreagena soyoae [syn. kilmeri], Archivesica gigas, and Calyptogena pacifica). In contrast, A. gigas was the only species sampled across the hydrothermal vent area. The same haplotype of A. gigas was found in both hydrothermal vent and cold seep areas, highlighting possible contemporary exchanges among neighboring vents and seeps. In either ecosystem, molecular characterization of the symbionts confirmed the specificity between symbionts and hosts and supported the hypothesis of a predominantly vertical transmission. In addition, patterns of clams could reflect potential niche preferences for each species. The occurrence of numerous traces of vesicomyid movements on sediments in the sites colonized by A. gigas seemed to indicate that this species might have a better ability to move. Furthermore, variation in gill sulfur content could reveal a higher plasticity and sulfur storage capacity in A. gigas. Thus, the distribution of vesicomyid species across the chemosynthetic areas of the Guaymas Basin could be explained by differences in biological traits of the vesicomyid species that would allow A. gigas to more easily exploit transient and punctual sources of available sulfide than P. soyoae.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0173-9565 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000472949800006 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2605  
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Auteur (up) Dalleau, M.; Kramer-Schadt, S.; Gangat, Y.; Bourjea, J.; Lajoie, G.; Grimm, V. doi  openurl
  Titre Modeling the emergence of migratory corridors and foraging hot spots of the green sea turtle Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Evol.  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés aldabra atoll; chelonia-mydas; connectivity; corridors; individual-based model; leatherback turtles; marine turtles; migration; movement; penghu archipelago; population-dynamics; remigration intervals; satellite-tracking; sea turtle; wan-an island  
  Résumé Environmental factors shape the spatial distribution and dynamics of populations. Understanding how these factors interact with movement behavior is critical for efficient conservation, in particular for migratory species. Adult female green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, migrate between foraging and nesting sites that are generally separated by thousands of kilometers. As an emblematic endangered species, green turtles have been intensively studied, with a focus on nesting, migration, and foraging. Nevertheless, few attempts integrated these behaviors and their trade-offs by considering the spatial configurations of foraging and nesting grounds as well as environmental heterogeneity like oceanic currents and food distribution. We developed an individual-based model to investigate the impact of local environmental conditions on emerging migratory corridors and reproductive output and to thereby identify conservation priority sites. The model integrates movement, nesting, and foraging behavior. Despite being largely conceptual, the model captured realistic movement patterns which confirm field studies. The spatial distribution of migratory corridors and foraging hot spots was mostly constrained by features of the regional landscape, such as nesting site locations, distribution of feeding patches, and oceanic currents. These constraints also explained the mixing patterns in regional forager communities. By implementing alternative decision strategies of the turtles, we found that foraging site fidelity and nesting investment, two characteristics of green turtles' biology, are favorable strategies under unpredictable environmental conditions affecting their habitats. Based on our results, we propose specific guidelines for the regional conservation of green turtles as well as future research suggestions advancing spatial ecology of sea turtles. Being implemented in an easy to learn open-source software, our model can coevolve with the collection and analysis of new data on energy budget and movement into a generic tool for sea turtle research and conservation. Our modeling approach could also be useful for supporting the conservation of other migratory marine animals.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000481747800001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2621  
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Auteur (up) Dalongeville, A.; Andrello, M.; Mouillot, D.; Albouy, C.; Manel, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecological traits shape genetic diversity patterns across the Mediterranean Sea: a quantitative review on fishes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 43 Numéro 4 Pages 845-857  
  Mots-Clés atlantic bluefin tuna; bass dicentrarchus-labrax; climate-change; cod gadus-morhua; ecological traits; effective population-size; genetic diversity; gilthead sea; life-history traits; marine fishes; marine populations; Mediterranean Sea; microsatellite markers; microsatellites; mitochondrial; mitochondrial DNA; molecular markers; population genetics  
  Résumé AimWe set out to identify the determinants of the variation in genetic diversity among fish species and test whether multi-species genetic diversity is randomly distributed in space. LocationMediterranean Sea. MethodsWe collected genetic diversity data from 39 published studies on Mediterranean fishes (31 species) along with the spatial coordinates of the sampling sites. We focused on microsatellite heterozygosity (151 data points) and mitochondrial haplotype diversity (201 data points). We used linear regressions to link genetic diversity and 11 ecological traits. We also tested for spatial autocorrelation and trends in the residuals. ResultsAmong-species variation in microsatellite heterozygosity was explained by three ecological traits: vertical distribution, migration type and body length. Variation in mitochondrial haplotype diversity was also explained by vertical distribution and migration type, and by reproductive strategy (semelparity). However, vertical distribution and migration type showed opposite effects on microsatellites and mitochondrial diversity. After accounting for the effects of ecological traits, no spatial pattern was detected, except for one of the species considered. Main conclusionsEcological factors explain an important proportion of the among-species genetic diversity. These results suggest that life history strategies of the species influence the variation of microsatellite diversity indirectly through their effect on effective population size, while the spatial variations of genetic diversity seem to be too complex to be identified in our analysis. We found very different effects of traits on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA diversity, which can be explained by the specificities of mitochondrial DNA (absence of recombination, maternal inheritance and non-neutrality).  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1627  
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Auteur (up) Dalongeville, A.; Andrello, M.; Mouillot, D.; Lobreaux, S.; Fortin, M.-J.; Lasram, F.; Belmaker, J.; Rocklin, D.; Manel, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Geographic isolation and larval dispersal shape seascape genetic patterns differently according to spatial scale Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Evol. Appl.  
  Volume 11 Numéro 8 Pages 1437-1447  
  Mots-Clés caribbean reef fish; connectivity; divergent selection; ecological data; ecological genetics; landscape genetics; marine connectivity; marine fish; Mediterranean Sea; Mullus surmuletus; neighbor matrices; oceanography; population-structure; sea; seascape genetics; single nucleotide polymorphism; surmuletus  
  Résumé Genetic variation, as a basis of evolutionary change, allows species to adapt and persist in different climates and environments. Yet, a comprehensive assessment of the drivers of genetic variation at different spatial scales is still missing in marine ecosystems. Here, we investigated the influence of environment, geographic isolation, and larval dispersal on the variation in allele frequencies, using an extensive spatial sampling (47 locations) of the striped red mullet (Mullus surmuletus) in the Mediterranean Sea. Univariate multiple regressions were used to test the influence of environment (salinity and temperature), geographic isolation, and larval dispersal on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele frequencies. We used Moran's eigenvector maps (db-MEMs) and asymmetric eigenvector maps (AEMs) to decompose geographic and dispersal distances in predictors representing different spatial scales. We found that salinity and temperature had only a weak effect on the variation in allele frequencies. Our results revealed the predominance of geographic isolation to explain variation in allele frequencies at large spatial scale (>1,000km), while larval dispersal was the major predictor at smaller spatial scale (<1,000km). Our findings stress the importance of including spatial scales to understand the drivers of spatial genetic variation. We suggest that larval dispersal allows to maintain gene flows at small to intermediate scale, while at broad scale, genetic variation may be mostly shaped by adult mobility, demographic history, or multigenerational stepping-stone dispersal. These findings bring out important spatial scale considerations to account for in the design of a protected area network that would efficiently enhance protection and persistence capacity of marine species.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1752-4571 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2422  
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Auteur (up) Daniel, A.; Laës-Huon, A.; Barus, C.; Beaton, A.D.; Blandfort, D.; Guigues, N.; Knockaert, M.; Munaron, D.; Salter, I.; Woodward, E.M.S.; Greenwood, N.; Achterberg, E.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Toward a Harmonization for Using in situ Nutrient Sensors in the Marine Environment Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 6 Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés Data comparability; EOVs; In situ sensor; marine biogeochemistry; nutrient; observing systems  
  Résumé Improved comparability of nutrient concentrations in seawater is required to enhance the quality and utility of measurements reported to global databases. Significant progress has been made over recent decades in improving the analysis and data quality for traditional laboratory measurements of nutrients. Similar efforts are required to establish high-quality data outputs from in situ nutrient sensors, which are rapidly becoming integral components of ocean observing systems. This paper suggests using the good practices routine established for laboratory reference methods to propose a harmonized set of deployment protocols and of quality control procedures for nutrient measurements obtained from in situ sensors. These procedures are intended to establish a framework to standardize the technical and analytical controls carried out on the three main types of in situ nutrient sensors currently available (wet chemical analyzers, ultraviolet optical sensors, electrochemical sensors) for their deployments on all kinds of platform. The routine reference controls that can be applied to the sensors are listed for each step of sensor use: initial qualification under controlled conditions in the laboratory, preparation of the sensor before deployment, field deployment and finally the sensor recovery. The fundamental principles applied to the laboratory reference method are then reviewed in terms of the calibration protocol, instrumental interferences, environmental interferences, external controls, and method performance assessment. Data corrections (linearity, sensitivity, drifts, interferences and outliers) are finally identified along with the concepts and calculations for qualification for both real time and time delayed data. This paper emphasizes the necessity of future collaborations between research groups, reference-accredited laboratories, and technology developers, to maintain comparability of the concentrations reported for the various nutrient parameters measured by in situ sensors.  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000508595900001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2690  
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