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Auteur (up) Dalleau, M.; Kramer-Schadt, S.; Gangat, Y.; Bourjea, J.; Lajoie, G.; Grimm, V. doi  openurl
  Titre Modeling the emergence of migratory corridors and foraging hot spots of the green sea turtle Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Evol.  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés aldabra atoll; chelonia-mydas; connectivity; corridors; individual-based model; leatherback turtles; marine turtles; migration; movement; penghu archipelago; population-dynamics; remigration intervals; satellite-tracking; sea turtle; wan-an island  
  Résumé Environmental factors shape the spatial distribution and dynamics of populations. Understanding how these factors interact with movement behavior is critical for efficient conservation, in particular for migratory species. Adult female green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, migrate between foraging and nesting sites that are generally separated by thousands of kilometers. As an emblematic endangered species, green turtles have been intensively studied, with a focus on nesting, migration, and foraging. Nevertheless, few attempts integrated these behaviors and their trade-offs by considering the spatial configurations of foraging and nesting grounds as well as environmental heterogeneity like oceanic currents and food distribution. We developed an individual-based model to investigate the impact of local environmental conditions on emerging migratory corridors and reproductive output and to thereby identify conservation priority sites. The model integrates movement, nesting, and foraging behavior. Despite being largely conceptual, the model captured realistic movement patterns which confirm field studies. The spatial distribution of migratory corridors and foraging hot spots was mostly constrained by features of the regional landscape, such as nesting site locations, distribution of feeding patches, and oceanic currents. These constraints also explained the mixing patterns in regional forager communities. By implementing alternative decision strategies of the turtles, we found that foraging site fidelity and nesting investment, two characteristics of green turtles' biology, are favorable strategies under unpredictable environmental conditions affecting their habitats. Based on our results, we propose specific guidelines for the regional conservation of green turtles as well as future research suggestions advancing spatial ecology of sea turtles. Being implemented in an easy to learn open-source software, our model can coevolve with the collection and analysis of new data on energy budget and movement into a generic tool for sea turtle research and conservation. Our modeling approach could also be useful for supporting the conservation of other migratory marine animals.  
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  ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes WOS:000481747800001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2621  
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Auteur (up) Dalongeville, A.; Andrello, M.; Mouillot, D.; Albouy, C.; Manel, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecological traits shape genetic diversity patterns across the Mediterranean Sea: a quantitative review on fishes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 43 Numéro 4 Pages 845-857  
  Mots-Clés atlantic bluefin tuna; bass dicentrarchus-labrax; climate-change; cod gadus-morhua; ecological traits; effective population-size; genetic diversity; gilthead sea; life-history traits; marine fishes; marine populations; Mediterranean Sea; microsatellite markers; microsatellites; mitochondrial; mitochondrial DNA; molecular markers; population genetics  
  Résumé AimWe set out to identify the determinants of the variation in genetic diversity among fish species and test whether multi-species genetic diversity is randomly distributed in space. LocationMediterranean Sea. MethodsWe collected genetic diversity data from 39 published studies on Mediterranean fishes (31 species) along with the spatial coordinates of the sampling sites. We focused on microsatellite heterozygosity (151 data points) and mitochondrial haplotype diversity (201 data points). We used linear regressions to link genetic diversity and 11 ecological traits. We also tested for spatial autocorrelation and trends in the residuals. ResultsAmong-species variation in microsatellite heterozygosity was explained by three ecological traits: vertical distribution, migration type and body length. Variation in mitochondrial haplotype diversity was also explained by vertical distribution and migration type, and by reproductive strategy (semelparity). However, vertical distribution and migration type showed opposite effects on microsatellites and mitochondrial diversity. After accounting for the effects of ecological traits, no spatial pattern was detected, except for one of the species considered. Main conclusionsEcological factors explain an important proportion of the among-species genetic diversity. These results suggest that life history strategies of the species influence the variation of microsatellite diversity indirectly through their effect on effective population size, while the spatial variations of genetic diversity seem to be too complex to be identified in our analysis. We found very different effects of traits on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA diversity, which can be explained by the specificities of mitochondrial DNA (absence of recombination, maternal inheritance and non-neutrality).  
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  ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1627  
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Auteur (up) Dalongeville, A.; Andrello, M.; Mouillot, D.; Lobreaux, S.; Fortin, M.-J.; Lasram, F.; Belmaker, J.; Rocklin, D.; Manel, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Geographic isolation and larval dispersal shape seascape genetic patterns differently according to spatial scale Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Evol. Appl.  
  Volume 11 Numéro 8 Pages 1437-1447  
  Mots-Clés caribbean reef fish; connectivity; divergent selection; ecological data; ecological genetics; landscape genetics; marine connectivity; marine fish; Mediterranean Sea; Mullus surmuletus; neighbor matrices; oceanography; population-structure; sea; seascape genetics; single nucleotide polymorphism; surmuletus  
  Résumé Genetic variation, as a basis of evolutionary change, allows species to adapt and persist in different climates and environments. Yet, a comprehensive assessment of the drivers of genetic variation at different spatial scales is still missing in marine ecosystems. Here, we investigated the influence of environment, geographic isolation, and larval dispersal on the variation in allele frequencies, using an extensive spatial sampling (47 locations) of the striped red mullet (Mullus surmuletus) in the Mediterranean Sea. Univariate multiple regressions were used to test the influence of environment (salinity and temperature), geographic isolation, and larval dispersal on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele frequencies. We used Moran's eigenvector maps (db-MEMs) and asymmetric eigenvector maps (AEMs) to decompose geographic and dispersal distances in predictors representing different spatial scales. We found that salinity and temperature had only a weak effect on the variation in allele frequencies. Our results revealed the predominance of geographic isolation to explain variation in allele frequencies at large spatial scale (>1,000km), while larval dispersal was the major predictor at smaller spatial scale (<1,000km). Our findings stress the importance of including spatial scales to understand the drivers of spatial genetic variation. We suggest that larval dispersal allows to maintain gene flows at small to intermediate scale, while at broad scale, genetic variation may be mostly shaped by adult mobility, demographic history, or multigenerational stepping-stone dispersal. These findings bring out important spatial scale considerations to account for in the design of a protected area network that would efficiently enhance protection and persistence capacity of marine species.  
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  ISSN 1752-4571 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2422  
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Auteur (up) Darling, E.S.; Graham, N.A.J.; Januchowski-Hartley, F.A.; Nash, K.L.; Pratchett, M.S.; Wilson, S.K. doi  openurl
  Titre Relationships between structural complexity, coral traits, and reef fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Coral Reefs  
  Volume 36 Numéro 2 Pages 561-575  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; community; coral reef fish; diversity; ecosystems; fisheries; functional ecology; Habitat complexity; Habitat diversity; life; marine reserves; ocean acidification; Reef architecture; scleractinian corals; species traits; vulnerability  
  Résumé With the ongoing loss of coral cover and the associated flattening of reef architecture, understanding the links between coral habitat and reef fishes is of critical importance. Here, we investigate whether considering coral traits and functional diversity provides new insights into the relationship between structural complexity and reef fish communities, and whether coral traits and community composition can predict structural complexity. Across 157 sites in Seychelles, Maldives, the Chagos Archipelago, and Australia's Great Barrier Reef, we find that structural complexity and reef zone are the strongest and most consistent predictors of reef fish abundance, biomass, species richness, and trophic structure. However, coral traits, diversity, and life histories provided additional predictive power for models of reef fish assemblages, and were key drivers of structural complexity. Our findings highlight that reef complexity relies on living corals-with different traits and life histories-continuing to build carbonate skeletons, and that these nuanced relationships between coral assemblages and habitat complexity can affect the structure of reef fish assemblages. Seascape-level estimates of structural complexity are rapid and cost effective with important implications for the structure and function of fish assemblages, and should be incorporated into monitoring programs.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0722-4028 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2150  
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Auteur (up) De Wit, R.; Rey-Valette, H.; Balavoine, J.; Ouisse, V.; Lifran, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Restoration ecology of coastal lagoons: new methods for the prediction of ecological trajectories and economic valuation Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquatic Conserv: Mar. Freshw. Ecosyst.  
  Volume 27 Numéro 1 Pages 137-157  
  Mots-Clés coastal lagoon; ecosystem services; ecosystem trajectory' nutrient enrichment; marine and brackish Magnoliophyta; oligotrophication; Phytoplankton; seagrass meadow; sediment N and P contents; Water Framework Directive; willingness to pay (WTP)  
  Résumé * Conservation of the seven lagoons of the Palavas complex (southern France) has been severely impaired by nutrient over-enrichment during at least four decades. The effluents of the Montpellier wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) represented the main nutrient input. To improve the water quality of these lagoons, this WWTP was renovated and upgraded and, since the end of 2005, its effluents have been discharged 11 km offshore into the Mediterranean (total investment €150 M). * Possibilities of ecosystem restoration as part of a conservation programme were explored by a focus group of experts. Their tasks were: (i) to evaluate the impact of the reduction of the nutrient input; (ii) if necessary, to design additional measures for an active restoration programme; and (iii) to predict ecosystem trajectories for the different cases. Extension of Magnoliophyta meadows can be taken as a proxy for ecosystem restoration as they favour the increase of several fish (seahorse) and bird (ducks, swans, herons) species, albeit they represent a trade-off for greater flamingos. Additional measures for active ecosystem restoration were only recommended for the most impaired lagoon Méjean, while the least impaired lagoon Ingril is already on a trajectory of spontaneous recovery. * A multiple contingent valuation considering four different management options for the Méjean lagoon was used in a pilot study based on face-to-face interviews with 159 respondents. Three levels of ecosystem restoration were expressed in terms of recovery of Magnoliophyta meadows, including their impact on emblematic fish and avifauna. These were combined with different options for access (status quo, increasing access, increasing access with measures to reduce disturbance). The results show a willingness of local populations to pay per year about €25 for the highest level of ecological restoration, while they were only willing to allocate about €5 for additional footpaths and hides.

Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
 
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  ISSN 1099-0755 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2100  
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