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Auteur (down) Kaplan, D.; Hart, D.R.; Botsford, L.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Rotating spatial harvests and fishing effort displacement : a comment on Game et al. (2009) Type Article scientifique
  Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology Letters  
  Volume 13 Numéro Pages E10-E12  
  Mots-Clés Aire; Analyse; De; Des; Effort; Gestion; marine; Mathematique; Modele; Peche; Peches; Protegee; Rotation; Spatiale; Stock; Variation  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1461-0248 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 82  
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Auteur (down) Kaplan, D.; Chassot, E.; Amande, J.M.; Dueri, S.; Demarcq, H.; Dagorn, L.; Fonteneau, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Spatial management of Indian Ocean tropical tuna fisheries: potential and perspectives Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ices Journal of Marine Science  
  Volume 71 Numéro 7 Pages 1728-1749  
  Mots-Clés Bycatch; conservation; Indian Ocean; Marine protected areas (MPAs); pelagic; spatial management of fisheries; tropical tuna fisheries  
  Résumé Effective use of spatial management in the pelagic realm presents special challenges due to high fish and fisher mobility, limited knowledge and significant governance challenges. The tropical Indian Ocean provides an ideal case study for testing our ability to apply existing data sources to assessing impacts of spatial management on tuna fisheries because of several recent controversial spatial closures. We review the scientific underpinnings of pelagic MPA effects, spatio-temporal patterns of Indian Ocean tuna catch, by catch and fish movements, and the consequences of these for the efficacy of spatial management for Indian Ocean tropical tuna fisheries. The tropical Indian Ocean is characterized by strong environmental fluctuations, regular seasonal variability in catch, large observed tuna displacement distances, relatively uniform catch-per-unit-effort and bycatch rates over space, and high fisher mobility, all of which suggest significant variability and movement in tropical tuna fisheries that are simply not well adapted to static spatial closures. One possible exception to this overall conclusion would be a large time/area closure east of Somalia. If closed for a significant fraction of the year it could reduce purse-seine bycatch and juvenile tuna catch. Dynamic closures following fish migratory patterns are possible, but more focused information on fish movements will be needed for effective implementation. Fortunately, several recent improvements in conventional fishery management and reporting will likely enhance our ability to evaluate spatial and non-spatial management options in the near future, particularly as pertaining to bycatch species.  
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  ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1199  
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Auteur (down) Jimenez, H.; Dumas, P.; Mouillot, D.; Bigot, L.; Ferraris, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Harvesting effects on functional structure and composition of tropical invertebrate assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée ICES J. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 73 Numéro 2 Pages 420-428  
  Mots-Clés Bta; marine protected areas; shellfishing; species composition; tropical benthos  
  Résumé Anthropogenic disturbances affect ecosystem structure and functioning. The quantification of their impacts on highly diverse and structurally complex ecosystems, such as coral reefs, is challenging. These communities are facing rising fishing pressure, particularly on Pacific Islands such as New Caledonia. The main objective was to quantify harvesting effects on invertebrate assemblages across two contrasting habitats (soft- and hard-bottom), by comparing communities in marine protected areas (MPAs) with non-MPAs using 10 biological and ecological traits. Patterns of trait composition were compared with those of species composition by non-metric multidimensional scaling and permutational analysis of variance analyses. Traits most responsible for differences between MPAs and non-MPAs were determined using SIMPER analysis, and predictions on shellfishing effects were discussed. A total of 248 species were recorded in hard-bottom communities, mainly characterized by mobile epifauna living on corals, crawling, and possessing a shell (molluscs) or a cuticle (crabs and echinoderms). Soft-bottom habitats contained 166 species, dominated by burrowing and sedentary species, especially shelled (largely bivalves) and worm-like organisms. Clear differences in species and trait composition between MPA and non-MPAs were highlighted in both habitats. Harvesting activities have community-wide effects that change the functional composition of invertebrate assemblages, in particular in terms of living habits and mobility. The observed shifts in benthic communities can affect the functioning of tropical coastal ecosystems and need to be included in small-scale fisheries management in poorly known tropical environments.  
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  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  ISSN 1054-3139, 1095-9289 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1535  
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Auteur (down) Jensen, M.P.; FitzSimmons, N.N.; Bourjea, J.; Hamabata, T.; Reece, J.; Dutton, P.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre The evolutionary history and global phylogeography of the green turtle (Chelonia mydas) Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Biogeography  
  Volume 46 Numéro 5 Pages 860-870  
  Mots-Clés marine; mtDNA; conservation units; genetic hotspots; genetic structure; sea turtle  
  Résumé Aim To examine the genetic structure and global phylogeography of the endangered green sea turtle, Chelonia mydas, in light of past climatic events and current conservation needs. Location Tropical and subtropical beaches around the world. Methods We analysed 386 base pairs of the mitochondrial (mt)DNA control region of 4,878 individual nesting green turtle samples from 127 rookeries globally. We used phylogeographic analysis to assess how demographic history, dispersal and barriers to gene flow have led to the current distribution of mtDNA lineages. Results We identified 11 divergent lineages that were tied to specific biogeographical regions. The phylogenetic analyses revealed an ancient origin for the species centred in the Indo-Pacific and more recent colonization of the Central/Eastern Pacific as well as the Atlantic Basin. Overall the phylogeographic structure was strong but with a clear pattern of regional connectivity among rookeries. A Large genetic separation was found where there were obvious barriers to dispersal such as between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans and across the Pacific Ocean, as well as less obvious barriers to dispersal. Admixture of mtDNA haplotype lineages was detected at latitudinal extremes across the Indian Ocean and western Pacific Ocean resulting in these areas being nucleotide diversity hotspots. The highest regional genetic diversity and high endemic richness was observed in the SW Pacific, NW Pacific, SW Indian and NW Indian oceans. Main conclusions Past climatic fluctuations greatly affected the distribution of genetic diversity in the highly migratory green turtle. Our data suggest that past climatic events influenced local populations in different ways and the species appears to have survived the last glaciations in multiple glacial refugia.  
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  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  ISSN 1365-2699 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000471344900003 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2608  
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Auteur (down) Jaspers, C.; Huwer, B.; Antajan, E.; Hosia, A.; Hinrichsen, H.-H.; Biastoch, A.; Angel, D.; Asmus, R.; Augustin, C.; Bagheri, S.; Beggs, S.E.; Balsby, T.J.S.; Boersma, M.; Bonnet, D.; Christensen, J.T.; Daenhardt, A.; Delpy, F.; Falkenhaug, T.; Finenko, G.; Fleming, N.E.C.; Fuentes, V.; Galil, B.; Gittenberger, A.; Griffin, D.C.; Haslob, H.; Javidpour, J.; Kamburska, L.; Kube, S.; Langenberg, V.T.; Lehtiniemi, M.; Lombard, F.; Malzahn, A.; Marambio, M.; Mihneva, V.; Moller, L.F.; Niermann, U.; Okyar, M.I.; Ozdemir, Z.B.; Pitois, S.; Reusch, T.B.H.; Robbens, J.; Stefanova, K.; Thibault, D.; van der Veer, H.W.; Vansteenbrugge, L.; van Walraven, L.; Wozniczka, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Ocean current connectivity propelling the secondary spread of a marine invasive comb jelly across western Eurasia Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 27 Numéro 7 Pages 814-827  
  Mots-Clés abundance; biodiversity; biological invasions; black-sea; caspian sea; consequences; ctenophore mnemiopsis-leidyi; gelatinous zooplankton; invasion corridors; invasive species; jellyfish; larval transport; marine connectivity; Mnemiopsis leidyi; north-sea; range expansion; source populations; source-sink dynamics; waters; zooplankton  
  Résumé Aim: Invasive species are of increasing global concern. Nevertheless, the mechanisms driving further distribution after the initial establishment of non-native species remain largely unresolved, especially in marine systems. Ocean currents can be a major driver governing range occupancy, but this has not been accounted for in most invasion ecology studies so far. We investigate how well initial establishment areas are interconnected to later occupancy regions to test for the potential role of ocean currents driving secondary spread dynamics in order to infer invasion corridors and the source-sink dynamics of a non-native holoplanktonic biological probe species on a continental scale. Location: Western Eurasia. Time period: 1980s-2016. Major taxa studied: 'Comb jelly' Mnemiopsis leidyi. Methods: Based on 12,400 geo-referenced occurrence data, we reconstruct the invasion history of M. leidyi in western Eurasia. We model ocean currents and calculate their stability to match the temporal and spatial spread dynamics with large-scale connectivity patterns via ocean currents. Additionally, genetic markers are used to test the predicted connectivity between subpopulations. Results: Ocean currents can explain secondary spread dynamics, matching observed range expansions and the timing of first occurrence of our holoplanktonic non-native biological probe species, leading to invasion corridors in western Eurasia. In northern Europe, regional extinctions after cold winters were followed by rapid recolonizations at a speed of up to 2,000 km per season. Source areas hosting year-round populations in highly interconnected regions can re-seed genotypes over large distances after local extinctions. Main conclusions: Although the release of ballast water from container ships may contribute to the dispersal of non-native species, our results highlight the importance of ocean currents driving secondary spread dynamics. Highly interconnected areas hosting invasive species are crucial for secondary spread dynamics on a continental scale. Invasion risk assessments should consider large-scale connectivity patterns and the potential source regions of non-native marine species.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2390  
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