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Auteur Yemane, D.; Shin, Y.-J.; Field, J.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Exploring the effect of Marine Protected Areas on the dynamics of fish communities in the southern Benguela : an individual-based modelling approach Type Article scientifique
  Année 2009 Publication Revue Abrégée Ices Journal of Marine Science  
  Volume 66 Numéro 2 Pages 378-387  
  Mots-Clés ecosystem models; individual-based models; Marine Protected Areas; southern Benguela  
  Résumé Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) have been suggested as a tool that can achieve some of the goals of an Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries (EAF), e.g. prevention of overexploitation, biodiversity conservation, recovery of overexploited population, but the consequences of their establishment on the dynamics of protected components are often unclear. Spatial and multispecies models can be used to investigate the effects of their introduction. An individual-based, spatially explicit, size-structured, multispecies model (known as OSMOSE) is used to investigate the likely consequences of the introduction of three MPAs off the coast of South Africa, individually or in combination. The simultaneous introduction of the MPAs affected varying proportions of the distribution of the modelled species (5-17%) and 12% of the distribution of the whole community. In general, the introduction of the MPAs in the different scenarios resulted in a relative increase in the biomass of large predatory fish and a decrease in the biomass of small pelagic fish. The simulation demonstrates that consideration of trophic interactions is necessary when introducing MPAs, with indirect effects that may be detrimental to some (mainly smaller prey) species.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 16  
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Auteur Coll, M.; Steenbeek, J.; Lasram, F.B.; Mouillot, D.; Cury, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre 'Low-hanging fruit' for conservation of marine vertebrate species at risk in the Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Frontiers in Microbiology Revue Abrégée  
  Volume 24 Numéro 2 Pages 226-239  
  Mots-Clés Conservation priorities; cumulative threats; IUCN diversities; marine biodiversity; Marine Protected Areas; Mediterranean Sea  
  Résumé AimConservation priorities need to take the feasibility of protection measures into account. In times of economic pressure it is essential to identify the low-hanging fruit' for conservation: areas where human impacts are lower and biological diversity is still high, and thus conservation is more feasible. LocationWe used the Mediterranean large marine ecosystem (LME) as a case study to identify the overlapping areas of low threats and high diversity of vertebrate species at risk. MethodsThis LME is the first in the world to have a complete regional IUCN Red List assessment of the native marine fish. We augmented these data with distributions of marine mammals, marine turtles and seabirds at risk, and we calculated the spatial distributions of species at risk (IUCN densities). Using cumulative threats we identified priority areas for conservation of species at risk' (PACS), where IUCN diversities are high and threats are low. We assessed whether IUCN diversities and PACS were spatially congruent among taxa and we quantified whether PACS corresponded to current and proposed protected areas. ResultsIUCN densities and PACS were not highly correlated spatially among taxa. Continental shelves and deep-sea slopes of the Alboran Sea, western Mediterranean and Tunisian Plateau/Gulf of Sidra are identified as relevant for fish species at risk. The eastern side of the western Mediterranean and the Adriatic Sea are identified as most relevant for endemic fish, and shelf and open sea areas distributed through the LME are most important for marine mammals and turtles at risk, while specific locations of the western Mediterranean Sea and the Aegean and Levantine seas are highlighted for seabirds. Main conclusionsLarge parts of the areas of PACS fell outside current or proposed frameworks to be prioritized for conservation. PACS may be suitable candidates for contributing to the 10% protection target for the Mediterranean Sea by 2020.  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1102  
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Auteur Marinesque, S.; Kaplan, D.; Rodwell, L.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Global implementation of marine protected areas : is the developing world being left behind ? Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Policy  
  Volume 36 Numéro 3 Pages 727-737  
  Mots-Clés Conservation targets; Developing world; Gap analysis; International policy; Marine protected areas (MPAs); Meta-analysis  
  Résumé While the global network of marine protected areas (MPAs) has recently been evaluated in the light of bio-geographic targets, there has been no attempt to evaluate the relative conservation efforts made by the different nations with regards to their level of socio-economic development. Using information mostly gathered from the world database on protected areas (WDPA), this paper gives a comparative assessment of MPA progress in countries from different economic categories, ranging from advanced economies to least developed countries (LDCs). Potentially explanatory socio-economic and environmental factors, such as fishing activity and existence of vulnerable marine ecosystems, for variability between nations in the level of MPA implementation are also explored. Existing MPA databases demonstrate a clear gap between developed and developing nations in MPA establishment, with advanced economies accounting for two thirds of the global MPA network. Patterns of MPA use, however, remain extremely heterogeneous between countries within each development group. International agreements on marine conservation, above and beyond the influence of country socioeconomic and environmental profiles, are identified as a stimulating factor to MPA implementation. The level dependence on marine resource extraction appears to impede MPA implementation, though the relationship is not statistically significant due to large heterogeneity among countries. Leading developed nations increasingly use MPAs to designate integrated and adaptive management areas, and implementation of large “no-take” reserves in relatively-pristine overseas areas continues to accelerate. These analyses highlight certain limitations regarding our ability to assess the true conservation effectiveness of the existing global MPA network and the need for improved indicators of MPA restrictions and management efforts.  
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  ISSN 0308-597x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 204  
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Auteur Grüss, A.; Kaplan, D.M.; Robinson, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Evaluation of the effectiveness of marine reserves for transient spawning aggregations in data-limited situations Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée ICES J. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés coral reef fish; fisheries closures; marine conservation; Marine Protected Areas; protogynous hermaphrodites; resource management  
  Résumé Grüss, A., Kaplan, D. M., and Robinson, J. Evaluation of the effectiveness of marine reserves for transient spawning aggregations in data-limited situations. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, doi:10.1093/icesjms/fst028. Many coral reef fish species form predictable, transient spawning aggregations. Many aggregations are overfished, making them a target for spatial management. Here, we develop a per-recruit model to evaluate the performance of no-take marine reserves protecting transient spawning aggregations. The model consists of only 14 demographic and exploitation-related parameters. We applied the model to a protogynous grouper and a gonochoristic rabbitfish from Seychelles and tested six scenarios regarding the extent of protected areas, the level of fish spawning-site fidelity, and fishing effort redistribution post reserve implementation. Spawning aggregation reserves improve spawning-stock biomass-per-recruit and reduce the sex ratio bias in protogynous populations for all scenarios examined. However, these benefits are often small and vary among the different scenarios and as a function of sexual ontogeny. In all scenarios, increases in yield-per-recruit do not occur or are negligible. The long-term yield increases due to spawning aggregation reserves may still occur, but only if spawning-stock biomass recovery results in a recruitment subsidy. Given these limited benefits, the value of no-take reserves must be weighed against those of other management options, such as fishing effort reduction and seasonal fishery closures. The latter is particularly appropriate when spawning and non-spawning areas overlap in space.  
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  ISSN 1054-3139, 1095-9289 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 259  
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Auteur Jimenez, H.; Dumas, P.; Mouillot, D.; Bigot, L.; Ferraris, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Harvesting effects on functional structure and composition of tropical invertebrate assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée ICES J. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 73 Numéro 2 Pages 420-428  
  Mots-Clés Bta; marine protected areas; shellfishing; species composition; tropical benthos  
  Résumé Anthropogenic disturbances affect ecosystem structure and functioning. The quantification of their impacts on highly diverse and structurally complex ecosystems, such as coral reefs, is challenging. These communities are facing rising fishing pressure, particularly on Pacific Islands such as New Caledonia. The main objective was to quantify harvesting effects on invertebrate assemblages across two contrasting habitats (soft- and hard-bottom), by comparing communities in marine protected areas (MPAs) with non-MPAs using 10 biological and ecological traits. Patterns of trait composition were compared with those of species composition by non-metric multidimensional scaling and permutational analysis of variance analyses. Traits most responsible for differences between MPAs and non-MPAs were determined using SIMPER analysis, and predictions on shellfishing effects were discussed. A total of 248 species were recorded in hard-bottom communities, mainly characterized by mobile epifauna living on corals, crawling, and possessing a shell (molluscs) or a cuticle (crabs and echinoderms). Soft-bottom habitats contained 166 species, dominated by burrowing and sedentary species, especially shelled (largely bivalves) and worm-like organisms. Clear differences in species and trait composition between MPA and non-MPAs were highlighted in both habitats. Harvesting activities have community-wide effects that change the functional composition of invertebrate assemblages, in particular in terms of living habits and mobility. The observed shifts in benthic communities can affect the functioning of tropical coastal ecosystems and need to be included in small-scale fisheries management in poorly known tropical environments.  
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  ISSN 1054-3139, 1095-9289 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1535  
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