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Auteur Espinosa, F.; Rivera-Ingraham, G.A.
Titre Biological Conservation of Giant Limpets: The Implications of Large Size Type (up) Chapitre de livre
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée
Volume Numéro Pages 105-155
Mots-Clés cymbula-nigra gastropoda; endangered limpet; lottia-gigantea; marine protected areas; mussel mytilus-galloprovincialis; patella-ferruginea gastropoda; population-structure; scutellastra-argenvillei; sex-change; south-african limpet
Résumé Patellogastropods, also known as true limpets, are distributed throughout the world and constitute key species in coastal ecosystems. Some limpet species achieve remarkable sizes, which in the most extreme cases can surpass 35 cm in shell length. In this review, we focus on giant limpets, which are defined as those with a maximum shell size surpassing 10 cm. According to the scientific literature, there are a total of 14 species across five genera that reach these larger sizes. Four of these species are threatened or in danger of extinction. Inhabiting the intertidal zones, limpets are frequently affected by anthropogenic impacts, namely collection by humans, pollution and habitat fragmentation. In the case of larger species, their conspicuous size has made them especially prone to human collection since prehistoric times. Size is not phylogeny-dependent among giant limpets, but is instead related to behavioural traits instead. Larger-sized species tend to be nonmigratory and territorial compared to those that are smaller. Collection by humans has been cited as the main cause behind the decline and/or extinction of giant limpet populations. Their conspicuously large size makes them the preferred target of human collection. Because they are protandric species, selectively eliminating larger specimens of a given population seriously compromises their viability and has led to local extinction events in some cases. Additionally, sustained collection over time may lead to microevolutionary responses that result in genetic changes. The growing presence of artificial structures in coastal ecosystems may cause population fragmentation and isolation, limiting the genetic flow and dispersion capacity of many limpet species. However, when they are necessitated, artificial structures could be managed to establish marine artificial microreserves and contribute to the conservation of giant limpet species that naturally settle on them.
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Editeur Elsevier Academic Press Inc Lieu de Publication San Diego Éditeur Curry, B.E.
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé Advances in Marine Biology, Vol 76
Volume de collection 76 Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-0-12-812402-4 978-0-12-812401-7 Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2180
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Auteur Grüss, A.; Kaplan, D.M.; Robinson, J.
Titre Evaluation of the effectiveness of marine reserves for transient spawning aggregations in data-limited situations Type (up) Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée ICES J. Mar. Sci.
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés coral reef fish; fisheries closures; marine conservation; Marine Protected Areas; protogynous hermaphrodites; resource management
Résumé Grüss, A., Kaplan, D. M., and Robinson, J. Evaluation of the effectiveness of marine reserves for transient spawning aggregations in data-limited situations. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, doi:10.1093/icesjms/fst028. Many coral reef fish species form predictable, transient spawning aggregations. Many aggregations are overfished, making them a target for spatial management. Here, we develop a per-recruit model to evaluate the performance of no-take marine reserves protecting transient spawning aggregations. The model consists of only 14 demographic and exploitation-related parameters. We applied the model to a protogynous grouper and a gonochoristic rabbitfish from Seychelles and tested six scenarios regarding the extent of protected areas, the level of fish spawning-site fidelity, and fishing effort redistribution post reserve implementation. Spawning aggregation reserves improve spawning-stock biomass-per-recruit and reduce the sex ratio bias in protogynous populations for all scenarios examined. However, these benefits are often small and vary among the different scenarios and as a function of sexual ontogeny. In all scenarios, increases in yield-per-recruit do not occur or are negligible. The long-term yield increases due to spawning aggregation reserves may still occur, but only if spawning-stock biomass recovery results in a recruitment subsidy. Given these limited benefits, the value of no-take reserves must be weighed against those of other management options, such as fishing effort reduction and seasonal fishery closures. The latter is particularly appropriate when spawning and non-spawning areas overlap in space.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1054-3139, 1095-9289 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 259
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Auteur Calo, A.; Lett, C.; Mourre, B.; Perez-Ruzafa, A.; Antonio Garcia-Charton, J.
Titre Use of Lagrangian simulations to hindcast the geographical position of propagule release zones in a Mediterranean coastal fish Type (up) Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Environ. Res.
Volume 134 Numéro Pages 16-27
Mots-Clés circulation; Mediterranean Sea; sea; dispersal; larval; habitat; marine protected areas; recruitment; variability; population connectivity; Dispersal distance; Lagrangian simulations; mesoscale eddies; Propagule release zones; Sea bream
Résumé The study of organism dispersal is fundamental for elucidating patterns of connectivity between populations, thus crucial for the design of effective protection and management strategies. This is especially challenging in the case of coastal fish, for which information on egg release zones (i.e. spawning grounds) is often lacking. Here we assessed the putative location of egg release zones of the saddled sea bream (Oblada melanura) along the southeastern coast of Spain in 2013. To this aim, we hindcasted propagule (egg and larva) dispersal using Lagrangian simulations, fed with species-specific information on early life history traits (ELTs), with two approaches: 1) back-tracking and 2) comparing settler distribution obtained from simulations to the analogous distribution resulting from otolith chemical analysis. Simulations were also used to assess which factors contributed the most to dispersal distances. Back-tracking simulations indicated that both the northern sector of the Murcia region and some traits of the North-African coast were hydrodynamically suitable to generate and drive the supply of larvae recorded along the coast of Murcia in 2013. With the second approach, based on the correlation between simulation outputs and field results (otolith chemical analysis), we found that the oceanographic characteristics of the study area could have determined the pattern of settler distribution recorded with otolith analysis in 2013 and inferred the geographical position of main O. melanura spawning grounds along the coast. Dispersal distance was found to be significantly affected by the geographical position of propagule release zones. The combination of methods used was the first attempt to assess the geographical position of propagule release zones in the Mediterranean Sea for O. melanura, and can represent a valuable approach for elucidating dispersal and connectivity patterns in other coastal species.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0141-1136 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2313
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Auteur Yemane, D.; Shin, Y.-J.; Field, J.G.
Titre Exploring the effect of Marine Protected Areas on the dynamics of fish communities in the southern Benguela : an individual-based modelling approach Type (up) Article scientifique
Année 2009 Publication Revue Abrégée Ices Journal of Marine Science
Volume 66 Numéro 2 Pages 378-387
Mots-Clés ecosystem models; individual-based models; Marine Protected Areas; southern Benguela
Résumé Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) have been suggested as a tool that can achieve some of the goals of an Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries (EAF), e.g. prevention of overexploitation, biodiversity conservation, recovery of overexploited population, but the consequences of their establishment on the dynamics of protected components are often unclear. Spatial and multispecies models can be used to investigate the effects of their introduction. An individual-based, spatially explicit, size-structured, multispecies model (known as OSMOSE) is used to investigate the likely consequences of the introduction of three MPAs off the coast of South Africa, individually or in combination. The simultaneous introduction of the MPAs affected varying proportions of the distribution of the modelled species (5-17%) and 12% of the distribution of the whole community. In general, the introduction of the MPAs in the different scenarios resulted in a relative increase in the biomass of large predatory fish and a decrease in the biomass of small pelagic fish. The simulation demonstrates that consideration of trophic interactions is necessary when introducing MPAs, with indirect effects that may be detrimental to some (mainly smaller prey) species.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 16
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Auteur Goetze, J.S.; Claudet, J.; Januchowski-Hartley, F.; Langlois, T.J.; Wilson, S.K.; White, C.; Weeks, R.; Jupiter, S.D.
Titre Demonstrating multiple benefits from periodically harvested fisheries closures Type (up) Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Appl. Ecol.
Volume 55 Numéro 3 Pages 1102-1113
Mots-Clés analytical framework; conservation; coral-reef fishes; customary management; fisheries management; food security; locally managed marine areas; long-term; management; marine protected areas; marine reserve; matter; meta-analysis; metaanalysis; partially protected areas; periodically harvested closures; populations; reserves; small-scale fisheries; video
Résumé 1. Periodically harvested closures (PHCs) are one of the most common forms of fisheries management in Melanesia, demonstrating multiple objectives, including sustaining fish stocks and increasing catch efficiency to support small-scale fisheries. No studies have comprehensively assessed their ability to provide short-term fisheries benefits across the entire harvest regime. 2. We present a novel analytical framework to guide a meta-analysis and assist future research in conceptualizing and assessing the potential of PHCs to deliver benefits for multiple fisheries-related objectives. 3. Ten PHCs met our selection criteria and on average, they provided a 48% greater abundance and 92% greater biomass of targeted fishes compared with areas open to fishing prior to being harvested. 4. This translated into tangible harvest benefits, with fishers removing 21% of the abundance and 49% of the biomass within PHCs, resulting in few post-harvest protection benefits. 5. When PHCs are larger, closed for longer periods or well enforced, short-term fisheries benefits are improved. However, an increased availability of fish within PHCs leads to greater removal during harvests. 6. Synthesis and applications. Periodically harvested closures (PHCs) can provide short-term fisheries benefits. Use of the analytical framework presented here will assist in determining long-term fisheries and conservation benefits. We recommend PHCs be closed to fishing for as long as possible, be as large as possible, that compliance be encouraged via community engagement and enforcement, and strict deadlines/goals for harvesting set to prevent overfishing.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2345
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