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Auteur Giakoumi, S.; Guilhaumon, F.; Kark, S.; Terlizzi, A.; Claudet, J.; Felline, S.; Cerrano, C.; Coll, M.; Danovaro, R.; Fraschetti, S.; Koutsoubas, D.; Ledoux, J.-B.; Mazor, T.; Mérigot, B.; Micheli, F.; Katsanevakis, S.
Titre Space invaders; biological invasions in marine conservation planning Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Divers. Distrib.
Volume 22 Numéro 12 Pages 1220-1231
Mots-Clés alien species; biodiversity; biological invasions; coastal; conservation planning; cost; diversity; ecosystem; impacts; management actions; marine biogeographic regions; marine protected areas; Mediterranean Sea; pathways; protected areas; strategy
Résumé AimBiological invasions are major contributors to global change and native biodiversity decline. However, they are overlooked in marine conservation plans. Here, we examine for the first time the extent to which marine conservation planning research has addressed (or ignored) biological invasions. Furthermore, we explore the change of spatial priorities in conservation plans when different approaches are used to incorporate the presence and impacts of invasive species. LocationGlobal analysis with a focus on the Mediterranean Sea region. MethodsWe conducted a systematic literature review consisting of three steps: (1) article selection using a search engine, (2) abstract screening and (3) review of pertinent articles, which were identified in the second step. The information extracted included the scale and geographical location of each case study as well as the approach followed regarding invasive species. We also applied the software Marxan to produce and compare conservation plans for the Mediterranean Sea that either protect, or avoid areas impacted by invasives, or ignore the issue. One case study focused on the protection of critical habitats, and the other on endemic fish species. ResultsWe found that of 119 papers on marine spatial plans in specific biogeographic regions, only three (2.5%) explicitly took into account invasive species. When comparing the different conservation plans for each case study, we found that the majority of selected sites for protection (ca. 80%) changed in the critical habitat case study, while this proportion was lower but substantial (27%) in the endemic fish species case study. Main conclusionsBiological invasions are being widely disregarded when planning for conservation in the marine environment across local to global scales. More explicit consideration of biological invasions can significantly alter spatial conservation priorities. Future conservation plans should explicitly account for biological invasions to optimize the selection of marine protected areas.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection (up) Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1366-9516 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1704
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Auteur Campbell, S.J.; Darling, E.S.; Pardede, S.; Ahmadia, G.; Mangubhai, S.; Amkieltiela; Estradivari; Maire, E.
Titre Fishing restrictions and remoteness deliver conservation outcomes for Indonesia's coral reef fisheries Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Conserv. Lett.
Volume Numéro Pages e12698
Mots-Clés data-poor fisheries; dynamics; food webs; gear restrictions; management; marine protected areas; small-scale fisheries; South East Asia; targets
Résumé Coral reef fisheries depend on reef fish biomass to support ecosystem functioning and sustainable fisheries. Here, we evaluated coral reefs across 4,000 km of the Indonesian archipelago to reveal a large gradient of biomass, from 17,000 kg/ha. Trophic pyramids characterized by planktivore dominance emerged at high biomass, suggesting the importance of pelagic pathways for reef productivity. Total biomass and the biomass of most trophic groups were higher within gear restricted and no-take management, but the greatest biomass was found on unmanaged remote reefs. Within marine protected areas (MPAs), 41.6% and 43.6% of gear restricted and no-take zones, respectively, met a global biomass target of 500 kg/ha, compared with 71.8% of remote sites. To improve conservation outcomes for Indonesia's biodiverse and economically important coral reef fisheries, our results suggest to: (1) strengthen management within Indonesia's existing MPAs and (2) precautionarily manage remote reefs with high biomass.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection (up) Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1755-263x ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000510789900001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2733
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Auteur Kaplan, D.; Chassot, E.; Amande, J.M.; Dueri, S.; Demarcq, H.; Dagorn, L.; Fonteneau, A.
Titre Spatial management of Indian Ocean tropical tuna fisheries: potential and perspectives Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ices Journal of Marine Science
Volume 71 Numéro 7 Pages 1728-1749
Mots-Clés Bycatch; conservation; Indian Ocean; Marine protected areas (MPAs); pelagic; spatial management of fisheries; tropical tuna fisheries
Résumé Effective use of spatial management in the pelagic realm presents special challenges due to high fish and fisher mobility, limited knowledge and significant governance challenges. The tropical Indian Ocean provides an ideal case study for testing our ability to apply existing data sources to assessing impacts of spatial management on tuna fisheries because of several recent controversial spatial closures. We review the scientific underpinnings of pelagic MPA effects, spatio-temporal patterns of Indian Ocean tuna catch, by catch and fish movements, and the consequences of these for the efficacy of spatial management for Indian Ocean tropical tuna fisheries. The tropical Indian Ocean is characterized by strong environmental fluctuations, regular seasonal variability in catch, large observed tuna displacement distances, relatively uniform catch-per-unit-effort and bycatch rates over space, and high fisher mobility, all of which suggest significant variability and movement in tropical tuna fisheries that are simply not well adapted to static spatial closures. One possible exception to this overall conclusion would be a large time/area closure east of Somalia. If closed for a significant fraction of the year it could reduce purse-seine bycatch and juvenile tuna catch. Dynamic closures following fish migratory patterns are possible, but more focused information on fish movements will be needed for effective implementation. Fortunately, several recent improvements in conventional fishery management and reporting will likely enhance our ability to evaluate spatial and non-spatial management options in the near future, particularly as pertaining to bycatch species.
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Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection (up) Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1199
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