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Auteur Calo, A.; Lett, C.; Mourre, B.; Perez-Ruzafa, A.; Antonio Garcia-Charton, J.
Titre Use of Lagrangian simulations to hindcast the geographical position of propagule release zones in a Mediterranean coastal fish Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Environ. Res.
Volume 134 Numéro Pages 16-27
Mots-Clés circulation; Mediterranean Sea; sea; dispersal; larval; habitat; marine protected areas; recruitment; variability; population connectivity; Dispersal distance; Lagrangian simulations; mesoscale eddies; Propagule release zones; Sea bream
Résumé The study of organism dispersal is fundamental for elucidating patterns of connectivity between populations, thus crucial for the design of effective protection and management strategies. This is especially challenging in the case of coastal fish, for which information on egg release zones (i.e. spawning grounds) is often lacking. Here we assessed the putative location of egg release zones of the saddled sea bream (Oblada melanura) along the southeastern coast of Spain in 2013. To this aim, we hindcasted propagule (egg and larva) dispersal using Lagrangian simulations, fed with species-specific information on early life history traits (ELTs), with two approaches: 1) back-tracking and 2) comparing settler distribution obtained from simulations to the analogous distribution resulting from otolith chemical analysis. Simulations were also used to assess which factors contributed the most to dispersal distances. Back-tracking simulations indicated that both the northern sector of the Murcia region and some traits of the North-African coast were hydrodynamically suitable to generate and drive the supply of larvae recorded along the coast of Murcia in 2013. With the second approach, based on the correlation between simulation outputs and field results (otolith chemical analysis), we found that the oceanographic characteristics of the study area could have determined the pattern of settler distribution recorded with otolith analysis in 2013 and inferred the geographical position of main O. melanura spawning grounds along the coast. Dispersal distance was found to be significantly affected by the geographical position of propagule release zones. The combination of methods used was the first attempt to assess the geographical position of propagule release zones in the Mediterranean Sea for O. melanura, and can represent a valuable approach for elucidating dispersal and connectivity patterns in other coastal species.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN (up) 0141-1136 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2313
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Auteur Batsleer, J.; Marchal, P.; Vaz, S.; Vermard, V.; Rijnsdorp, A.D.; Poos, J.J.
Titre Exploring habitat credits to manage the benthic impact in a mixed fishery Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.
Volume 586 Numéro Pages 167-179
Mots-Clés growth; sea; reserves; marine protected areas; juvenile; Plaice; Eastern English Channel; Fleet dynamics; vms data; fishing disturbance; central english-channel; Cod; costs; Dynamic state variable modelling; georges bank; Mixed fisheries; tac; Total allowable catch
Résumé The performance of a combined catch quota and habitat credit system was explored to manage the sustainable exploitation of a mix of demersal fish species and reduce the benthic impacts of bottom trawl fisheries using a dynamic state variable model approach. The model was parameterised for the Eastern English Channel demersal mixed fishery using otter trawls or dredges. Target species differed in their association with habitat types. Restricting catch quota for plaice and cod had a limited effect on benthic impact, except when reduced to very low values, forcing the vessels to stay in port. Quota management had a minimal influence on fishing behaviour and hence resulted in a minimal reduction of benthic impact. Habitat credits may reduce the benthic impacts of the trawl fisheries at a minimal loss of landings and revenue, as vessels are still able to reallocate their effort to less vulnerable fishing grounds, while allowing the fishery to catch their catch quota and maintain their revenue. Only if they are reduced to extremely low levels can habitat credits potentially constrain fishing activities to levels that prevent the fisheries from using up the catch quota for the target species.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN (up) 0171-8630 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2283
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Auteur Eduardo Nole, L.; Frédou, T.; Souza Lira, A.; Padovani Ferreira, B.; Bertrand, A.; Ménard, F.; Lucena Frédou, F.
Titre Identifying key habitat and spatial patterns of fish biodiversity in the tropical Brazilian continental shelf Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Continental Shelf Research
Volume 166 Numéro Pages 108-118
Mots-Clés Demersal fish assemblage; Fish assemblage structure; Habitat composition; Marine Protected Areas; Northeast Brazilian coast; Underwater footages
Résumé Knowledge of the spatial distribution of fish assemblages biodiversity and structure is essential for prioritizing areas of conservation. Here we describe the biodiversity and community structure of demersal fish assemblages and their habitat along the northeast Brazilian coast by combining bottom trawl data and underwater footage. Species composition was estimated by number and weight, while patterns of dominance were obtained based on frequency of occurrence and relative abundance. A total of 7235 individuals (830 kg), distributed in 24 orders, 49 families and 120 species were collected. Community structure was investigated through clustering analysis and by a non-metric multidimensional scaling technique. Finally, diversity was assessed based on six indices. Four major assemblages were identified, mainly associated with habitat type and depth range. The higher values of richness were found in sand substrate with rocks, coralline formations and sponges (SWCR) habitats, while higher values of diversity were found in habitats located on shallow waters (10–30 m). Further, assemblages associated with sponge-reef formations presented the highest values of richness and diversity. In management strategies of conservation, we thus recommend giving special attention on SWCR habitats, mainly those located on depths between 30 and 60 m. This can be achieved by an offshore expansion of existing MPAs and/or by the creation of new MPAs encompassing those environments.
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Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN (up) 0278-4343 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2384
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Auteur Ban, N.C.; Maxwell, S.M.; Dunn, D.C.; Hobday, A.J.; Bax, N.J.; Ardron, J.; Gjerde, K.M.; Game, E.T.; Devillers, R.; Kaplan, D.M.; Dunstan, P.K.; Halpin, P.N.; Pressey, R.L.
Titre Better integration of sectoral planning and management approaches for the interlinked ecology of the open oceans Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Policy
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés Areas beyond national jurisdiction; Benthic-pelagic interlinkages; High seas; marine conservation; Marine Protected Areas; sustainable fisheries
Résumé Open oceans are one of the least protected, least studied and most inadequately managed ecosystems on Earth. Three themes were investigated that differentiate the open ocean (areas beyond national jurisdiction and deep area within exclusive economic zones) from other realms and must be considered when developing planning and management options: ecosystem interactions, especially between benthic and pelagic systems; potential effects of human activities in open oceans on ecological linkages; and policy context and options. A number of key ecological factors differentiate open oceans from coastal systems for planners and managers: (1) many species are widely distributed and, especially for those at higher trophic levels, wide ranging; (2) the sizes and boundaries of biogeographical domains (patterns of co-occurrence of species, habitats and ecosystem processes) vary significantly by depth; (3) habitat types exhibit a wide range of stabilities, from ephemeral (e.g., surface frontal systems) to hyper-stable (e.g., deep sea); and (4) vertical and horizontal linkages are prevalent. Together, these ecological attributes point to interconnectedness between open ocean habitats across large spatial scales. Indeed, human activities – especially fishing, shipping, and potentially deep-sea mining and oil and gas extraction – have effects far beyond the parts of the ocean in which they operate. While managing open oceans in an integrated fashion will be challenging, the ecological characteristics of the system demand it. A promising avenue forward is to integrate aspects of marine spatial planning (MSP), systematic conservation planning (SCP), and adaptive management. These three approaches to planning and management need to be integrated to meet the unique needs of open ocean systems, with MSP providing the means to meet a diversity of stakeholder needs, SCP providing the structured process to determine and prioritise those needs and appropriate responses, and adaptive management providing rigorous monitoring and evaluation to determine whether actions or their modifications meet both ecological and defined stakeholder needs. The flexibility of MSP will be enhanced by the systematic approach of SCP, while the rigorous monitoring of adaptive management will enable continued improvement as new information becomes available and further experience is gained.
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Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN (up) 0308-597x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 317
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Auteur Marinesque, S.; Kaplan, D.; Rodwell, L.D.
Titre Global implementation of marine protected areas : is the developing world being left behind ? Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Policy
Volume 36 Numéro 3 Pages 727-737
Mots-Clés Conservation targets; Developing world; Gap analysis; International policy; Marine protected areas (MPAs); Meta-analysis
Résumé While the global network of marine protected areas (MPAs) has recently been evaluated in the light of bio-geographic targets, there has been no attempt to evaluate the relative conservation efforts made by the different nations with regards to their level of socio-economic development. Using information mostly gathered from the world database on protected areas (WDPA), this paper gives a comparative assessment of MPA progress in countries from different economic categories, ranging from advanced economies to least developed countries (LDCs). Potentially explanatory socio-economic and environmental factors, such as fishing activity and existence of vulnerable marine ecosystems, for variability between nations in the level of MPA implementation are also explored. Existing MPA databases demonstrate a clear gap between developed and developing nations in MPA establishment, with advanced economies accounting for two thirds of the global MPA network. Patterns of MPA use, however, remain extremely heterogeneous between countries within each development group. International agreements on marine conservation, above and beyond the influence of country socioeconomic and environmental profiles, are identified as a stimulating factor to MPA implementation. The level dependence on marine resource extraction appears to impede MPA implementation, though the relationship is not statistically significant due to large heterogeneity among countries. Leading developed nations increasingly use MPAs to designate integrated and adaptive management areas, and implementation of large “no-take” reserves in relatively-pristine overseas areas continues to accelerate. These analyses highlight certain limitations regarding our ability to assess the true conservation effectiveness of the existing global MPA network and the need for improved indicators of MPA restrictions and management efforts.
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Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN (up) 0308-597x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 204
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