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Auteur (up) LAGABRIELLE, E.; CROCHELET, E.; ANDRELLO, M.; SCHILL, S.R.; ARNAUD-HAOND, S.; ALLONCLE, N.; PONGE, B. url  openurl
  Titre Connecting MPAs – eight challenges for science and management Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquatic Conservation-marine And Freshwater Ecosystems  
  Volume 24 Numéro Pages 94-110  
  Mots-Clés coastal; conservation evaluation; Fishing; Marine Protected Areas; ocean; spatial modelling  
  Résumé Connectivity is a crucial process underpinning the persistence, recovery, and productivity of marine ecosystems. The Convention on Biological Diversity, through the Aichi Target 11, has set the ambitious objective of implementing a ‘well connected system of protected areas’ by 2020. This paper identifies eight challenges toward the integration of connectivity into MPA network management and planning. A summary table lists the main recommendations in terms of method, tool, advice, or action to address each of these challenges. Authors belong to a science–management continuum including researchers, international NGO officers, and national MPA agency members. Three knowledge challenges are addressed: selecting and integrating connectivity measurement metrics; assessing the accuracy and uncertainty of connectivity measurements; and communicating and visualizing connectivity measurements. Three management challenges are described: integrating connectivity into the planning and management of MPA networks; setting quantitative connectivity targets; and implementing connectivity-based management across scales and marine jurisdictions. Finally, two paths toward a better integration of connectivity science with MPA management are proposed: setting management-driven priorities for connectivity research, bridging connectivity science, and MPA network management. There is no single method to integrate connectivity into marine spatial planning. Rather, an array of methods can be assembled according to the MPA network objectives, budget, available skills, data, and timeframe. Overall, setting up ‘boundary organizations’ should be promoted to organize complex cross-disciplinary, cross-sectoral and cross-jurisdiction interactions that are needed between scientists, managers, stakeholders and decision-makers to make informed decision regarding connectivity-based MPA planning and management.  
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  ISSN 1052-7613 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1133  
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Auteur (up) Magris, R.A.; Andrello, M.; Pressey, R.L.; Mouillot, D.; Dalongeville, A.; Jacobi, M.N.; Manel, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Biologically representative and well-connected marine reserves enhance biodiversity persistence in conservation planning Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Conserv. Lett.  
  Volume 11 Numéro 4 Pages Unsp-e12439  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity conservation; climate-change; coral-reefs; design; larval dispersal; marine protected areas; marine reserve design; networks; population connectivity; protected areas; spatial planning; spatial prioritization  
  Résumé Current methods in conservation planning for promoting the persistence of biodiversity typically focus on either representing species geographic distributions or maintaining connectivity between reserves, but rarely both, and take a focal species, rather than a multispecies, approach. Here, we link prioritization methods with population models to explore the impact of integrating both representation and connectivity into conservation planning for species persistence. Using data on 288 Mediterranean fish species with varying conservation requirements, we show that: (1) considering both representation and connectivity objectives provides the best strategy for enhanced biodiversity persistence and (2) connectivity objectives were fundamental to enhancing persistence of small-ranged species, which are most in need of conservation, while the representation objective benefited only wide-ranging species. Our approach provides a more comprehensive appraisal of planning applications than approaches focusing on either representation or connectivity, and will hopefully contribute to build more effective reserve networks for the persistence of biodiversity.  
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  ISSN 1755-263x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2423  
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Auteur (up) Maire, Eva; Cinner, J.; Velez, L.; Huchery, C.; Mora, C.; D'agata, S.; Vigliola, L.; Wantiez, L.; Kulbicki, M.; Mouillot, D. doi  openurl
  Titre How accessible are coral reefs to people? A global assessment based on travel time Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Lett.  
  Volume 19 Numéro 4 Pages 351-360  
  Mots-Clés Accessibility; biodiversity; coral reefs; ecological-systems; fish assemblages; fisheries; marine protected areas; market access; population-density; predictors; social<bold>-</bold>ecological; species richness; travel time; vulnerability  
  Résumé The depletion of natural resources has become a major issue in many parts of the world, with the most accessible resources being most at risk. In the terrestrial realm, resource depletion has classically been related to accessibility through road networks. In contrast, in the marine realm, the impact on living resources is often framed into the Malthusian theory of human density around ecosystems. Here, we develop a new framework to estimate the accessibility of global coral reefs using potential travel time from the nearest human settlement or market. We show that 58% of coral reefs are located <30min from the nearest human settlement. We use a case study from New Caledonia to demonstrate that travel time from the market is a strong predictor of fish biomass on coral reefs. We also highlight a relative deficit of protection on coral reef areas near people, with disproportional protection on reefs far from people. This suggests that conservation efforts are targeting low-conflict reefs or places that may already be receiving de facto protection due to their isolation. Our global assessment of accessibility in the marine realm is a critical step to better understand the interplay between humans and resources.  
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  ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1626  
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Auteur (up) Marinesque, S.; Kaplan, D.; Rodwell, L.D. url  doi
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  Titre Global implementation of marine protected areas : is the developing world being left behind ? Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Policy  
  Volume 36 Numéro 3 Pages 727-737  
  Mots-Clés Conservation targets; Developing world; Gap analysis; International policy; Marine protected areas (MPAs); Meta-analysis  
  Résumé While the global network of marine protected areas (MPAs) has recently been evaluated in the light of bio-geographic targets, there has been no attempt to evaluate the relative conservation efforts made by the different nations with regards to their level of socio-economic development. Using information mostly gathered from the world database on protected areas (WDPA), this paper gives a comparative assessment of MPA progress in countries from different economic categories, ranging from advanced economies to least developed countries (LDCs). Potentially explanatory socio-economic and environmental factors, such as fishing activity and existence of vulnerable marine ecosystems, for variability between nations in the level of MPA implementation are also explored. Existing MPA databases demonstrate a clear gap between developed and developing nations in MPA establishment, with advanced economies accounting for two thirds of the global MPA network. Patterns of MPA use, however, remain extremely heterogeneous between countries within each development group. International agreements on marine conservation, above and beyond the influence of country socioeconomic and environmental profiles, are identified as a stimulating factor to MPA implementation. The level dependence on marine resource extraction appears to impede MPA implementation, though the relationship is not statistically significant due to large heterogeneity among countries. Leading developed nations increasingly use MPAs to designate integrated and adaptive management areas, and implementation of large “no-take” reserves in relatively-pristine overseas areas continues to accelerate. These analyses highlight certain limitations regarding our ability to assess the true conservation effectiveness of the existing global MPA network and the need for improved indicators of MPA restrictions and management efforts.  
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  ISSN 0308-597x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 204  
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Auteur (up) Marsac, F.; Galletti, F.; Ternon, J.-F.; Romanov, E.V.; Demarcq, H.; Corbari, L.; Bouchet, P.; Roest, W.R.; Jorry, S.J.; Olu, K.; Loncke, L.; Roberts, M.J.; Ménard, F. url  doi
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  Titre Seamounts, plateaus and governance issues in the southwestern Indian Ocean, with emphasis on fisheries management and marine conservation, using the Walters Shoal as a case study for implementing a protection framework Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography  
  Volume Numéro Pages 104715  
  Mots-Clés Amended Nairobi Convention; Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction; Benthic biodiversity; Deep-sea fisheries; Deep-sea mining; International Law of the Sea; Marine protected areas; Saya de Malha Bank; South Indian Ocean Fisheries Agreement; Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems  
  Résumé There is a growing interest in the management of seamounts of the Southwestern Indian Ocean (SWIO) both in waters under national jurisdictions and in the Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction (ABNJ). New scientific knowledge has been gathered through various oceanographic cruises during the past decade, and new agreements are under consideration globally to promote conservation and sustainable use of the biodiversity in the ABNJ, where the deep sea ecosystems associated with seamounts are a growing matter of concern. SWIO seamounts have attracted the interests of fishers since the 1960s, and contracts for mining exploration have been granted recently. Seamounts are known to shelter rich, fragile and poorly resilient ecosystems whose important ecological functions are threatened by various anthropogenic pressures. Whereas many seamounts and shoals are located in national waters, many others fall in the ABNJ, with no current legal status per se. To ensure conservation of their habitats and biodiversity, it is essential that protection measures are instigated under an internationally recognized legal and institutional framework. In this paper, we review the current state of such a framework relevant to seamounts, with emphasis on fisheries and conservation in the SWIO. An emblematic seamount, the Walters Shoal, is selected as a case study to discuss how it could become a fully-protected space in the ABNJ. As a large part of the SWIO is under the mandate of the Nairobi Convention (as a Regional Sea under the auspices of UNEP), guidelines are proposed to encourage dedicated seamount governance within the framework of this Convention.  
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  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2689  
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