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Auteur Goetze, J.S.; Claudet, J.; Januchowski-Hartley, F.; Langlois, T.J.; Wilson, S.K.; White, C.; Weeks, R.; Jupiter, S.D.
Titre Demonstrating multiple benefits from periodically harvested fisheries closures Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Appl. Ecol.
Volume 55 Numéro 3 Pages 1102-1113
Mots-Clés analytical framework; conservation; coral-reef fishes; customary management; fisheries management; food security; locally managed marine areas; long-term; management; marine protected areas; marine reserve; matter; meta-analysis; metaanalysis; partially protected areas; periodically harvested closures; populations; reserves; small-scale fisheries; video
Résumé (up) 1. Periodically harvested closures (PHCs) are one of the most common forms of fisheries management in Melanesia, demonstrating multiple objectives, including sustaining fish stocks and increasing catch efficiency to support small-scale fisheries. No studies have comprehensively assessed their ability to provide short-term fisheries benefits across the entire harvest regime. 2. We present a novel analytical framework to guide a meta-analysis and assist future research in conceptualizing and assessing the potential of PHCs to deliver benefits for multiple fisheries-related objectives. 3. Ten PHCs met our selection criteria and on average, they provided a 48% greater abundance and 92% greater biomass of targeted fishes compared with areas open to fishing prior to being harvested. 4. This translated into tangible harvest benefits, with fishers removing 21% of the abundance and 49% of the biomass within PHCs, resulting in few post-harvest protection benefits. 5. When PHCs are larger, closed for longer periods or well enforced, short-term fisheries benefits are improved. However, an increased availability of fish within PHCs leads to greater removal during harvests. 6. Synthesis and applications. Periodically harvested closures (PHCs) can provide short-term fisheries benefits. Use of the analytical framework presented here will assist in determining long-term fisheries and conservation benefits. We recommend PHCs be closed to fishing for as long as possible, be as large as possible, that compliance be encouraged via community engagement and enforcement, and strict deadlines/goals for harvesting set to prevent overfishing.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2345
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Auteur Dubois, M.; Rossi, V.; Ser-Giacomi, E.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Lopez, C.; Hernandez-Garcia, E.
Titre Linking basin-scale connectivity, oceanography and population dynamics for the conservation and management of marine ecosystems Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Global Ecology and Biogeography Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.
Volume 25 Numéro 5 Pages 503-515
Mots-Clés coral-reef fish; dispersal; genetic-structure; Larval dispersal; local retention; local retention; marine connectivity; marine ecosystems; marine protected areas; mediterranean littoral fishes; Mediterranean Sea; metapopulation; pelagic larval duration; population dynamics; Population Genetics; protected-area design; sea; self-recruitment; sink dynamics; source
Résumé (up) AimAssessing the spatial structure and dynamics of marine populations is still a major challenge in ecology. The need to manage marine resources from ecosystem and large-scale perspectives is recognized, but our partial understanding of oceanic connectivity limits the implementation of globally pertinent conservation planning. Based on a biophysical model for the entire Mediterranean Sea, this study takes an ecosystem approach to connectivity and provides a systematic characterization of broad-scale larval dispersal patterns. It builds on our knowledge of population dynamics and discusses the ecological and management implications. LocationThe semi-enclosed Mediterranean Sea and its marine ecosystems are used as a case study to investigate broad-scale connectivity patterns and to relate them to oceanography and population dynamics. MethodsA flow network is constructed by evenly subdividing the basin into sub-regions which are interconnected through the transport of larvae by ocean currents. It allows for the computation of various connectivity metrics required to evaluate larval retention and exchange. ResultsOur basin-scale model predicts that retention processes are weak in the open ocean while they are significant in the coastal ocean and are favoured along certain coastlines due to specific oceanographic features. Moreover, we show that wind-driven divergent (convergent, respectively) oceanic regions are systematically characterized by larval sources (sinks, respectively). Finally, although these connectivity metrics have often been studied separately in the literature, we demonstrate they are interrelated under particular conditions. Their integrated analysis facilitates the appraisal of population dynamics, informing both genetic and demographic connectivities. Main conclusionsThis modelling framework helps ecologists and geneticists to formulate improved hypotheses of population structures and gene flow patterns and to design their sampling strategy accordingly. It is also useful in the implementation and assessment of future protection strategies, such as coastal and offshore marine reserves, by accounting for large-scale dispersal patterns, a missing component of current ecosystem management.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1655
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Auteur Giakoumi, S.; Guilhaumon, F.; Kark, S.; Terlizzi, A.; Claudet, J.; Felline, S.; Cerrano, C.; Coll, M.; Danovaro, R.; Fraschetti, S.; Koutsoubas, D.; Ledoux, J.-B.; Mazor, T.; Mérigot, B.; Micheli, F.; Katsanevakis, S.
Titre Space invaders; biological invasions in marine conservation planning Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Divers. Distrib.
Volume 22 Numéro 12 Pages 1220-1231
Mots-Clés alien species; biodiversity; biological invasions; coastal; conservation planning; cost; diversity; ecosystem; impacts; management actions; marine biogeographic regions; marine protected areas; Mediterranean Sea; pathways; protected areas; strategy
Résumé (up) AimBiological invasions are major contributors to global change and native biodiversity decline. However, they are overlooked in marine conservation plans. Here, we examine for the first time the extent to which marine conservation planning research has addressed (or ignored) biological invasions. Furthermore, we explore the change of spatial priorities in conservation plans when different approaches are used to incorporate the presence and impacts of invasive species. LocationGlobal analysis with a focus on the Mediterranean Sea region. MethodsWe conducted a systematic literature review consisting of three steps: (1) article selection using a search engine, (2) abstract screening and (3) review of pertinent articles, which were identified in the second step. The information extracted included the scale and geographical location of each case study as well as the approach followed regarding invasive species. We also applied the software Marxan to produce and compare conservation plans for the Mediterranean Sea that either protect, or avoid areas impacted by invasives, or ignore the issue. One case study focused on the protection of critical habitats, and the other on endemic fish species. ResultsWe found that of 119 papers on marine spatial plans in specific biogeographic regions, only three (2.5%) explicitly took into account invasive species. When comparing the different conservation plans for each case study, we found that the majority of selected sites for protection (ca. 80%) changed in the critical habitat case study, while this proportion was lower but substantial (27%) in the endemic fish species case study. Main conclusionsBiological invasions are being widely disregarded when planning for conservation in the marine environment across local to global scales. More explicit consideration of biological invasions can significantly alter spatial conservation priorities. Future conservation plans should explicitly account for biological invasions to optimize the selection of marine protected areas.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1366-9516 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1704
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Auteur Coll, M.; Steenbeek, J.; Lasram, F.B.; Mouillot, D.; Cury, P.
Titre 'Low-hanging fruit' for conservation of marine vertebrate species at risk in the Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Frontiers in Microbiology Revue Abrégée
Volume 24 Numéro 2 Pages 226-239
Mots-Clés Conservation priorities; cumulative threats; IUCN diversities; marine biodiversity; Marine Protected Areas; Mediterranean Sea
Résumé (up) AimConservation priorities need to take the feasibility of protection measures into account. In times of economic pressure it is essential to identify the low-hanging fruit' for conservation: areas where human impacts are lower and biological diversity is still high, and thus conservation is more feasible. LocationWe used the Mediterranean large marine ecosystem (LME) as a case study to identify the overlapping areas of low threats and high diversity of vertebrate species at risk. MethodsThis LME is the first in the world to have a complete regional IUCN Red List assessment of the native marine fish. We augmented these data with distributions of marine mammals, marine turtles and seabirds at risk, and we calculated the spatial distributions of species at risk (IUCN densities). Using cumulative threats we identified priority areas for conservation of species at risk' (PACS), where IUCN diversities are high and threats are low. We assessed whether IUCN diversities and PACS were spatially congruent among taxa and we quantified whether PACS corresponded to current and proposed protected areas. ResultsIUCN densities and PACS were not highly correlated spatially among taxa. Continental shelves and deep-sea slopes of the Alboran Sea, western Mediterranean and Tunisian Plateau/Gulf of Sidra are identified as relevant for fish species at risk. The eastern side of the western Mediterranean and the Adriatic Sea are identified as most relevant for endemic fish, and shelf and open sea areas distributed through the LME are most important for marine mammals and turtles at risk, while specific locations of the western Mediterranean Sea and the Aegean and Levantine seas are highlighted for seabirds. Main conclusionsLarge parts of the areas of PACS fell outside current or proposed frameworks to be prioritized for conservation. PACS may be suitable candidates for contributing to the 10% protection target for the Mediterranean Sea by 2020.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1102
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Auteur Jimenez, H.; Dumas, P.; Mouillot, D.; Bigot, L.; Ferraris, J.
Titre Harvesting effects on functional structure and composition of tropical invertebrate assemblages Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée ICES J. Mar. Sci.
Volume 73 Numéro 2 Pages 420-428
Mots-Clés Bta; marine protected areas; shellfishing; species composition; tropical benthos
Résumé (up) Anthropogenic disturbances affect ecosystem structure and functioning. The quantification of their impacts on highly diverse and structurally complex ecosystems, such as coral reefs, is challenging. These communities are facing rising fishing pressure, particularly on Pacific Islands such as New Caledonia. The main objective was to quantify harvesting effects on invertebrate assemblages across two contrasting habitats (soft- and hard-bottom), by comparing communities in marine protected areas (MPAs) with non-MPAs using 10 biological and ecological traits. Patterns of trait composition were compared with those of species composition by non-metric multidimensional scaling and permutational analysis of variance analyses. Traits most responsible for differences between MPAs and non-MPAs were determined using SIMPER analysis, and predictions on shellfishing effects were discussed. A total of 248 species were recorded in hard-bottom communities, mainly characterized by mobile epifauna living on corals, crawling, and possessing a shell (molluscs) or a cuticle (crabs and echinoderms). Soft-bottom habitats contained 166 species, dominated by burrowing and sedentary species, especially shelled (largely bivalves) and worm-like organisms. Clear differences in species and trait composition between MPA and non-MPAs were highlighted in both habitats. Harvesting activities have community-wide effects that change the functional composition of invertebrate assemblages, in particular in terms of living habits and mobility. The observed shifts in benthic communities can affect the functioning of tropical coastal ecosystems and need to be included in small-scale fisheries management in poorly known tropical environments.
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ISSN 1054-3139, 1095-9289 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1535
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