|   | 
Détails
   web
Enregistrements
Auteur (up) Ba, A.; Diouf, K.; Guilhaumon, F.; Panfili, J.
Titre Slow growth of the overexploited milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus affects its sustainability in West Africa Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée J Fish Biol
Volume 87 Numéro 4 Pages 912-929
Mots-Clés age; chondrichthyan; life-history traits; Senegal; vertebrae
Résumé Age and growth of Rhizoprionodon acutus were estimated from vertebrae age bands. From December 2009 to November 2010, 423 R. acutus between 37 and 112 cm total length (LT) were sampled along the Senegalese coast. Marginal increment ratio was used to check annual band deposition. Three growth models were adjusted to the length at age and compared using Akaike's information criterion. The Gompertz growth model with estimated size at birth appeared to be the best and resulted in growth parameters of L∞ = 139·55 (LT) and K = 0·17 year−1 for females and L∞ = 126·52 (LT) and K = 0·18 year−1 for males. The largest female and male examined were 8 and 9 years old, but the majority was between 1 and 3 years old. Ages at maturity estimated were 5·8 and 4·8 years for females and males, respectively. These results suggest that R. acutus is a slow-growing species, which render the species particularly vulnerable to heavy fishery exploitation. The growth parameters estimated in this study are crucial for stock assessments and for demographic analyses to evaluate the sustainability of commercial harvests.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1095-8649 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1417
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur (up) Barnagaud, J.-Y.; Kissling, W.D.; Tsirogiannis, C.; Fisikopoulos, V.; Villeger, S.; Sekercioglu, C.H.; Svenning, J.-C.
Titre Biogeographical, environmental and anthropogenic determinants of global patterns in bird taxonomic and trait turnover Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.
Volume 26 Numéro 10 Pages 1190-1200
Mots-Clés Anthropocene; Beta diversity; Beta-diversity; biogeographical legacies; biotic homogenization; climate changes; community; components; dispersal; functional diversity; functional diversity; life-history traits; mammal assemblages; net primary production; regional assemblages; specialization; species richness
Résumé AimTo assess contemporary and historical determinants of taxonomic and ecological trait turnover in birds worldwide. We tested whether taxonomic and trait turnover (1) are structured by regional bioclimatic conditions, (2) increase in relationship with topographic heterogeneity and environmental turnover and change according to current and historical environmental conditions, and (3) decrease with human impact. Major TaxaBirds. LocationGlobal. MethodsWe used computationally efficient algorithms to map the taxonomic and trait turnover of 8,040 terrestrial bird assemblages worldwide, based on a grid with 110km x 110 km resolution overlaid on the extent-of-occurrence maps of 7,964 bird species, and nine ecological traits reflecting six key aspects of bird ecology (diet, habitat use, thermal preference, migration, dispersal and body size). We used quantile regression and model selection to quantify the influence of biomes, environment (temperature, precipitation, altitudinal range, net primary productivity, Quaternary temperature and precipitation change) and human impact (human influence index) on bird turnover. ResultsBird taxonomic and trait turnover were highest in the north African deserts and boreal biomes. In the tropics, taxonomic turnover tended to be higher, but trait turnover was lower than in other biomes. Taxonomic and trait turnover exhibited markedly different or even opposing relationships with climatic and topographic gradients, but at their upper quantiles both types of turnover decreased with increasing human influence. Main conclusionsThe influence of regional, environmental and anthropogenic factors differ between bird taxonomic and trait turnover, consistent with an imprint of niche conservatism, environmental filtering and topographic barriers on bird regional assemblages. Human influence on these patterns is pervasive and demonstrates global biotic homogenization at a macroecological scale.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2212
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur (up) Cahill, A.E.; De Jode, A.; Dubois, S.; Bouzaza, Z.; Aurelle, D.; Boissin, E.; Chabrol, O.; David, R.; Egea, E.; Ledoux, J.-B.; Mérigot, B.; Weber, A.A.-T.; Chenuil, A.
Titre A multispecies approach reveals hot spots and cold spots of diversity and connectivity in invertebrate species with contrasting dispersal modes Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Mol. Ecol.
Volume 26 Numéro 23 Pages 6563-6577
Mots-Clés genetic diversity; dispersal; life-history traits; reef fishes; marine connectivity; pelagic larval duration; mediterranean sea; amphipholis-squamata; brooding brittle star; coralligenous assemblages; larvae; marine invertebrates; phylogeographical breaks; population structure; population genetic-structure; species genetic diversity correlation
Résumé Genetic diversity is crucial for species' maintenance and persistence, yet is often overlooked in conservation studies. Species diversity is more often reported due to practical constraints, but it is unknown if these measures of diversity are correlated. In marine invertebrates, adults are often sessile or sedentary and populations exchange genes via dispersal of gametes and larvae. Species with a larval period are expected to have more connected populations than those without larval dispersal. We assessed the relationship between measures of species and genetic diversity, and between dispersal ability and connectivity. We compiled data on genetic patterns and life history traits in nine species across five phyla. Sampling sites spanned 600km in the northwest Mediterranean Sea and focused on a 50-km area near Marseilles, France. Comparative population genetic approaches yielded three main results. (i) Species without larvae showed higher levels of genetic structure than species with free-living larvae, but the role of larval type (lecithotrophic or planktotrophic) was negligible. (ii) A narrow area around Marseilles, subject to offshore advection, limited genetic connectivity in most species. (iii) We identified sites with significant positive contributions to overall genetic diversity across all species, corresponding with areas near low human population densities. In contrast, high levels of human activity corresponded with a negative contribution to overall genetic diversity. Genetic diversity within species was positively and significantly linearly related to local species diversity. Our study suggests that local contribution to overall genetic diversity should be taken into account for future conservation strategies.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0962-1083 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2262
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur (up) Charmantier, G.; Anger, K.
Titre Ontogeny of osmoregulatory patterns in the South American shrimp Macrobrachium amazonicum: Loss of hypo-regulation in a land-locked population indicates phylogenetic separation from estuarine ancestors Type Article scientifique
Année 2011 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Volume 396 Numéro 2 Pages 89-98
Mots-Clés Biogeography; Crustacea; Life-history adaptations; Osmoregulation; ontogeny; speciation
Résumé
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 757
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur (up) Chiarello, M.; Auguet, J.-C.; Bettarel, Y.; Bouvier, C.; Claverie, T.; Graham, N.A.J.; Rieuvilleneuve, F.; Sucre, E.; Bouvier, T.; Villeger, S.
Titre Skin microbiome of coral reef fish is highly variable and driven by host phylogeny and diet Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Microbiome
Volume 6 Numéro Pages 147
Mots-Clés bacterial communities; divergence; diversity; evolution; insights; life-history; Microbiota; mucus; patterns; Phylogenetic diversity; Phylogenetic signal; Phylosymbiosis; sequence data; Teleost; Tropical; vulnerability
Résumé Background: The surface of marine animals is covered by abundant and diversified microbial communities, which have major roles for the health of their host While such microbiomes have been deeply examined in marine invertebrates such as corals and sponges, the microbiomes living on marine vertebrates have received less attention. Specifically, the diversity of these microbiomes, their variability among species, and their drivers are still mostly unknown, especially among the fish species living on coral reefs that contribute to key ecosystem services while they are increasingly affected by human activities. Here, we investigated these knowledge gaps analyzing the skin microbiome of 138 fish individuals belonging to 44 coral reef fish species living in the same area. Results: Prokaryotic communities living on the skin of coral reef fishes are highly diverse, with on average more than 600 OTUs per fish, and differ from planktonic microbes. Skin microbiomes varied between fish individual and species, and interspecific differences were slightly coupled to the phylogenetic affiliation of the host and its ecological traits. Conclusions: These results highlight that coral reef biodiversity is greater than previously appreciated, since the high diversity of macro-organisms supports a highly diversified microbial community. This suggest that beyond the loss of coral reefs-associated macroscopic species, anthropic activities on coral reefs could also lead to a loss of still unexplored host-associated microbial diversity, which urgently needs to be assessed.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2049-2618 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2421
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement