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Auteur BAUER, R.; Graewe, U.; Stepputtis, D.; Zimmermann, C.; Hammer, C. url  openurl
  Titre Identifying the location and importance of spawning sites of Western Baltic herring using a particle backtracking model Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ices Journal Of Marine Science  
  Volume 71 Numéro 3 Pages 499-509  
  Mots-Clés backtracking; Baltic Sea; Clupea harengus; hatching sites; lagoon; larval transport; spring spawning  
  Résumé The recruitment success of some herring stocks fluctuates strongly, and apparently, success is often already determined during the early life stages, i.e. before metamorphosis. In studying the survival of early life stages and its affecting factors, particularly those during the egg stage, it is crucial to examine the processes at the spawning sites, which often cannot be explored directly. A recent decline in the recruitment of Western Baltic spring-spawning herring (WBSSH) increases the urgency of filling the knowledge gap for this stock, especially because one bottleneck in the recruitment seems to occur before hatching. We examined the successful 20032009 spawning sites of WBSSH in the main spawning ground, the Greifswalder Bodden lagoon. Instead of using common techniques such as diving or underwater videography, which are usually unsuitable for mapping large areas, we applied a model approach. We tracked herring larvae at length 610 mm, recorded by larval surveys during MarchJune of the respective years, back to their hatching sites using a Lagrangian particle backtracking model. We compared the spawning areas identified by the model with the results of earlier field studies; however, we also analysed variations between years, larval length groups, and different applied growth models, which are needed to define hatch-dates. Although spawning sites could not be identified with high precision because of the strong diffusion in the area studied, results indicate that larvae up to 10 mm length are caught near their hatching sites. However, the location of successful spawning sites varied largely between years, with the main hatching sites situated in the Strelasund and the eastern entrance of the lagoon. This may reflect variations in spawning-site selection or quality. A better knowledge of the locations and relative importance of, and the processes occurring on, the different spawning sites will provide an important contribution to the sustainable management of this commercially valuable herring stock.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1136  
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Auteur Jaspers, C.; Huwer, B.; Antajan, E.; Hosia, A.; Hinrichsen, H.-H.; Biastoch, A.; Angel, D.; Asmus, R.; Augustin, C.; Bagheri, S.; Beggs, S.E.; Balsby, T.J.S.; Boersma, M.; Bonnet, D.; Christensen, J.T.; Daenhardt, A.; Delpy, F.; Falkenhaug, T.; Finenko, G.; Fleming, N.E.C.; Fuentes, V.; Galil, B.; Gittenberger, A.; Griffin, D.C.; Haslob, H.; Javidpour, J.; Kamburska, L.; Kube, S.; Langenberg, V.T.; Lehtiniemi, M.; Lombard, F.; Malzahn, A.; Marambio, M.; Mihneva, V.; Moller, L.F.; Niermann, U.; Okyar, M.I.; Ozdemir, Z.B.; Pitois, S.; Reusch, T.B.H.; Robbens, J.; Stefanova, K.; Thibault, D.; van der Veer, H.W.; Vansteenbrugge, L.; van Walraven, L.; Wozniczka, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Ocean current connectivity propelling the secondary spread of a marine invasive comb jelly across western Eurasia Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 27 Numéro 7 Pages 814-827  
  Mots-Clés abundance; biodiversity; biological invasions; black-sea; caspian sea; consequences; ctenophore mnemiopsis-leidyi; gelatinous zooplankton; invasion corridors; invasive species; jellyfish; larval transport; marine connectivity; Mnemiopsis leidyi; north-sea; range expansion; source populations; source-sink dynamics; waters; zooplankton  
  Résumé Aim: Invasive species are of increasing global concern. Nevertheless, the mechanisms driving further distribution after the initial establishment of non-native species remain largely unresolved, especially in marine systems. Ocean currents can be a major driver governing range occupancy, but this has not been accounted for in most invasion ecology studies so far. We investigate how well initial establishment areas are interconnected to later occupancy regions to test for the potential role of ocean currents driving secondary spread dynamics in order to infer invasion corridors and the source-sink dynamics of a non-native holoplanktonic biological probe species on a continental scale. Location: Western Eurasia. Time period: 1980s-2016. Major taxa studied: 'Comb jelly' Mnemiopsis leidyi. Methods: Based on 12,400 geo-referenced occurrence data, we reconstruct the invasion history of M. leidyi in western Eurasia. We model ocean currents and calculate their stability to match the temporal and spatial spread dynamics with large-scale connectivity patterns via ocean currents. Additionally, genetic markers are used to test the predicted connectivity between subpopulations. Results: Ocean currents can explain secondary spread dynamics, matching observed range expansions and the timing of first occurrence of our holoplanktonic non-native biological probe species, leading to invasion corridors in western Eurasia. In northern Europe, regional extinctions after cold winters were followed by rapid recolonizations at a speed of up to 2,000 km per season. Source areas hosting year-round populations in highly interconnected regions can re-seed genotypes over large distances after local extinctions. Main conclusions: Although the release of ballast water from container ships may contribute to the dispersal of non-native species, our results highlight the importance of ocean currents driving secondary spread dynamics. Highly interconnected areas hosting invasive species are crucial for secondary spread dynamics on a continental scale. Invasion risk assessments should consider large-scale connectivity patterns and the potential source regions of non-native marine species.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2390  
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