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Auteur Boyd, C.; Grunbaum, D.; Hunt, G.L.; Punt, A.E.; Weimerskirch, H.; Bertrand, S.
Titre Effectiveness of social information used by seabirds searching for unpredictable and ephemeral prey Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Behav. Ecol.
Volume 27 Numéro 4 Pages 1223-1234
Mots-Clés agent-based model; albatrosses; antarctic krill; central place foragers; colonies; evolution; foraging model; gannets; Habitat selection; insights; local enhancement; local enhancement; models; public information; search strategies
Résumé Understanding how seabirds and other central place foragers locate food resources represents a key step in predicting responses to changes in resource abundance and distribution. Where prey distributions are unpredictable and ephemeral, seabirds may gain up-to-date information by monitoring the direction of birds returning to the colony or by monitoring the foraging behavior of other birds through local enhancement. However, search strategies based on social information may require high population densities, raising concerns about the potential loss of information in declining populations. Our objectives were to explore the mechanisms that underpin effective search strategies based on social information under a range of population densities and different foraging conditions. Testing relevant hypotheses through field observation is challenging because of limitations in the ability to manipulate population densities and foraging conditions. We therefore developed a spatially explicit individual-based foraging model, informed by data on the movement and foraging patterns of seabirds foraging on pelagic prey, and used model simulations to investigate the mechanisms underpinning search strategies. Orientation of outbound headings in line with returning birds enables departing birds to avoid areas without prey even at relatively low population densities. The mechanisms underpinning local enhancement are more effective as population densities increase and may be facilitated by other mechanisms that concentrate individuals in profitable areas. For seabirds and other central place foragers foraging on unpredictable and ephemeral food resources, information is especially valuable when resources are spatially concentrated and may play an important role in mitigating poor foraging conditions.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1045-2249 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2068
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Auteur Chiarello, M.; Auguet, J.-C.; Bettarel, Y.; Bouvier, C.; Claverie, T.; Graham, N.A.J.; Rieuvilleneuve, F.; Sucre, E.; Bouvier, T.; Villeger, S.
Titre Skin microbiome of coral reef fish is highly variable and driven by host phylogeny and diet Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Microbiome
Volume 6 Numéro Pages 147
Mots-Clés bacterial communities; divergence; diversity; evolution; insights; life-history; Microbiota; mucus; patterns; Phylogenetic diversity; Phylogenetic signal; Phylosymbiosis; sequence data; Teleost; Tropical; vulnerability
Résumé Background: The surface of marine animals is covered by abundant and diversified microbial communities, which have major roles for the health of their host While such microbiomes have been deeply examined in marine invertebrates such as corals and sponges, the microbiomes living on marine vertebrates have received less attention. Specifically, the diversity of these microbiomes, their variability among species, and their drivers are still mostly unknown, especially among the fish species living on coral reefs that contribute to key ecosystem services while they are increasingly affected by human activities. Here, we investigated these knowledge gaps analyzing the skin microbiome of 138 fish individuals belonging to 44 coral reef fish species living in the same area. Results: Prokaryotic communities living on the skin of coral reef fishes are highly diverse, with on average more than 600 OTUs per fish, and differ from planktonic microbes. Skin microbiomes varied between fish individual and species, and interspecific differences were slightly coupled to the phylogenetic affiliation of the host and its ecological traits. Conclusions: These results highlight that coral reef biodiversity is greater than previously appreciated, since the high diversity of macro-organisms supports a highly diversified microbial community. This suggest that beyond the loss of coral reefs-associated macroscopic species, anthropic activities on coral reefs could also lead to a loss of still unexplored host-associated microbial diversity, which urgently needs to be assessed.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2049-2618 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2421
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Auteur Pereira, O.; Hochart, C.; Auguet, J.C.; Debroas, D.; Galand, P.E.
Titre Genomic ecology of Marine Group II, the most common marine planktonic Archaea across the surface ocean Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée MicrobiologyOpen
Volume 8 Numéro 9 Pages e852
Mots-Clés 16S rRNA; abundance; assemblages; bacteria; carbon; community; dynamics; euryarchaeota; Euryarchaeota; global ocean; insights; metagenomics; organisms; poseidoniales; proteorhodopsin
Résumé Planktonic Archaea have been detected in all the world's oceans and are found from surface waters to the deep sea. The two most common Archaea phyla are Thaumarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Euryarchaeota are generally more common in surface waters, but very little is known about their ecology and their potential metabolisms. In this study, we explore the genomic ecology of the Marine Group II (MGII), the main marine planktonic Euryarchaeota, and test if it is composed of different ecologically relevant units. We re-analyzed Tara Oceans metagenomes from the photic layer and the deep ocean by annotating sequences against a custom MGII database and by mapping gene co-occurrences. Our data provide a global view of the distribution of Euryarchaeota, and more specifically of MGII subgroups, and reveal their association to a number of gene-coding sequences. In particular, we show that MGII proteorhodopsins were detected in both the surface and the deep chlorophyll maximum layer and that different clusters of these light harvesting proteins were present. Our approach helped describing the set of genes found together with specific MGII subgroups. We could thus define genomic environments that could theoretically describe ecologically meaningful units and the ecological niche that they occupy.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2045-8827 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000485975100029 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2653
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