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Auteur Jensen, M.P.; FitzSimmons, N.N.; Bourjea, J.; Hamabata, T.; Reece, J.; Dutton, P.H.
Titre The evolutionary history and global phylogeography of the green turtle (Chelonia mydas) Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Biogeography
Volume 46 Numéro 5 Pages 860-870
Mots-Clés marine; mtDNA; conservation units; genetic hotspots; genetic structure; sea turtle
Résumé Aim To examine the genetic structure and global phylogeography of the endangered green sea turtle, Chelonia mydas, in light of past climatic events and current conservation needs. Location Tropical and subtropical beaches around the world. Methods We analysed 386 base pairs of the mitochondrial (mt)DNA control region of 4,878 individual nesting green turtle samples from 127 rookeries globally. We used phylogeographic analysis to assess how demographic history, dispersal and barriers to gene flow have led to the current distribution of mtDNA lineages. Results We identified 11 divergent lineages that were tied to specific biogeographical regions. The phylogenetic analyses revealed an ancient origin for the species centred in the Indo-Pacific and more recent colonization of the Central/Eastern Pacific as well as the Atlantic Basin. Overall the phylogeographic structure was strong but with a clear pattern of regional connectivity among rookeries. A Large genetic separation was found where there were obvious barriers to dispersal such as between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans and across the Pacific Ocean, as well as less obvious barriers to dispersal. Admixture of mtDNA haplotype lineages was detected at latitudinal extremes across the Indian Ocean and western Pacific Ocean resulting in these areas being nucleotide diversity hotspots. The highest regional genetic diversity and high endemic richness was observed in the SW Pacific, NW Pacific, SW Indian and NW Indian oceans. Main conclusions Past climatic fluctuations greatly affected the distribution of genetic diversity in the highly migratory green turtle. Our data suggest that past climatic events influenced local populations in different ways and the species appears to have survived the last glaciations in multiple glacial refugia.
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Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1365-2699 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000471344900003 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2608
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Auteur Letessier, T.B.; Mouillot, D.; Bouchet, P.J.; Vigliola, L.; Fernandes, M.C.; Thompson, C.; Boussarie, G.; Turner, J.; Juhel, J.-B.; Maire, E.; Caley, M.J.; Koldewey, H.J.; Friedlander, A.; Sala, E.; Meeuwig, J.J.
Titre Remote reefs and seamounts are the last refuges for marine predators across the Indo-Pacific Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée PLoS. Biol.
Volume 17 Numéro 8 Pages e3000366
Mots-Clés biodiversity; coastal; consequences; hotspots; mortality; ocean; patterns; protected areas; shark sanctuary; tracking
Résumé Since the 1950s, industrial fisheries have expanded globally, as fishing vessels are required to travel further afield for fishing opportunities. Technological advancements and fishery subsidies have granted ever-increasing access to populations of sharks, tunas, billfishes, and other predators. Wilderness refuges, defined here as areas beyond the detectable range of human influence, are therefore increasingly rare. In order to achieve marine resources sustainability, large no-take marine protected areas (MPAs) with pelagic components are being implemented. However, such conservation efforts require knowledge of the critical habitats for predators, both across shallow reefs and the deeper ocean. Here, we fill this gap in knowledge across the Indo-Pacific by using 1,041 midwater baited videos to survey sharks and other pelagic predators such as rainbow runner (Elagatis bipinnulata), mahimahi (Coryphaena hippurus), and black marlin (Istiompax indica). We modeled three key predator community attributes: vertebrate species richness, mean maximum body size, and shark abundance as a function of geomorphology, environmental conditions, and human pressures. All attributes were primarily driven by geomorphology (35%-62% variance explained) and environmental conditions (14%-49%). While human pressures had no influence on species richness, both body size and shark abundance responded strongly to distance to human markets (12%-20%). Refuges were identified at more than 1,250 km from human markets for body size and for shark abundance. These refuges were identified as remote and shallow seabed features, such as seamounts, submerged banks, and reefs. Worryingly, hotpots of large individuals and of shark abundance are presently under-represented within no-take MPAs that aim to effectively protect marine predators, such as the British Indian Ocean Territory. Population recovery of predators is unlikely to occur without strategic placement and effective enforcement of large no-take MPAs in both coastal and remote locations.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1544-9173 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000483408500011 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2638
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Auteur Mazel, F.; Pennell, M.W.; Cadotte, M.W.; Diaz, S.; Dalla Riva, G.V.; Grenyer, R.; Leprieur, F.; Mooers, A.O.; Mouillot, D.; Tucker, C.M.; Pearse, W.D.
Titre Prioritizing phylogenetic diversity captures functional diversity unreliably Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat. Commun.
Volume 9 Numéro Pages 2888
Mots-Clés biodiversity; conservation priorities; dependence; ecosystems; global patterns; gradients; hotspots; mammals; plant traits; species richness
Résumé In the face of the biodiversity crisis, it is argued that we should prioritize species in order to capture high functional diversity (FD). Because species traits often reflect shared evolutionary history, many researchers have assumed that maximizing phylogenetic diversity (PD) should indirectly capture FD, a hypothesis that we name the “phylogenetic gambit”. Here, we empirically test this gambit using data on ecologically relevant traits from >15,000 vertebrate species. Specifically, we estimate a measure of surrogacy of PD for FD. We find that maximizing PD results in an average gain of 18% of FD relative to random choice. However, this average gain obscures the fact that in over one-third of the comparisons, maximum PD sets contain less FD than randomly chosen sets of species. These results suggest that, while maximizing PD protection can help to protect FD, it represents a risky conservation strategy.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2396
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Auteur Santos, B.S.; Friedrichs, M.A.M.; Rose, S.A.; Barco, S.G.; Kaplan, D.M.
Titre Likely locations of sea turtle stranding mortality using experimentally-calibrated, time and space-specific drift models Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Conserv.
Volume 226 Numéro Pages 127-143
Mots-Clés bycatch; chesapeake bay; Chesapeake Bay; Drift simulations; Endangered species; fisheries; Fisheries and vessel interactions; global patterns; hotspots; ichthyoplankton; manatees; Marine conservation; megafauna; Protected species management; Sea turtle mortality; Sea turtle strandings; vessel; virginia
Résumé Sea turtle stranding events provide an opportunity to study drivers of mortality, but causes of strandings are poorly understood. A general sea turtle carcass oceanographic drift model was developed to estimate likely mortality locations from coastal sea turtle stranding records. Key model advancements include realistic direct wind forcing on carcasses, temperature driven carcass decomposition and the development of mortality location predictions for individual strandings. We applied this model to 2009-2014 stranding events within the Chesapeake Bay, Virginia. Predicted origin of vessel strike strandings were compared to commercial vessel data, and potential hazardous turtle-vessel interactions were identified in the southeastern Bay and James River. Commercial fishing activity of gear types with known sea turtle interactions were compared to predicted mortality locations for stranded turtles with suggested fisheries-induced mortality. Probable mortality locations for these strandings varied seasonally, with two distinct areas in the southwest and southeast portions of the lower Bay. Spatial overlap was noted between potential mortality locations and gillnet, seine, pot, and pound net fisheries, providing important information for focusing future research on mitigating conflict between sea turtles and human activities. Our ability to quantitatively assess spatial and temporal overlap between sea turtle mortality and human uses of the habitat were hindered by the low resolution of human use datasets, especially those for recreational vessel and commercial fishing gear distributions. This study highlights the importance of addressing these data gaps and provides a meaningful conservation tool that can be applied to stranding data of sea turtles and other marine megafauna worldwide.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2433
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Auteur Leprieur, F.; Colosio, S.; Descombes, P.; Parravicini, V.; Kulbicki, M.; Cowman, P.F.; Bellwood, D.R.; Mouillot, D.; Pellissier, L.
Titre Historical and contemporary determinants of global phylogenetic structure in tropical reef fish faunas Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography
Volume 39 Numéro 9 Pages 825-835
Mots-Clés biodiversity hotspots; climate-change; community ecology; coral-reefs; damselfishes teleostei; evolutionary origins; genetic-structure; indo-pacific; latitudinal diversity gradient; species richness
Résumé Identifying the main determinants of tropical marine biodiversity is essential for devising appropriate conservation measures mitigating the ongoing degradation of coral reef habitats. Based on a gridded distribution database and phylogenetic information, we compared the phylogenetic structure of assemblages for three tropical reef fish families (Labridae: wrasses, Pomacentridae: damselfishes and Chaetodontidae: butterflyfishes) using the net relatedness (NRI) and nearest taxon (NTI) indices. We then related these indices to contemporary and historical environmental conditions of coral reefs using spatial regression analyses. Higher levels of phylogenetic clustering were found for fish assemblages in the Indo-Australian Archipelago (IAA), and more particularly when considering the NTI index. The phylogenetic structure of the Pomacentridae, and to a lower extent of the Chaeotodontidae and Labridae, was primarily associated with the location of refugia during the Quaternary period. Phylogenetic clustering in the IAA may partly result from vicariance events associated with coral reef fragmentation during the glacial periods of the Quaternary. Variation in the patterns among fish families further suggest that dispersal abilities may have interacted with past habitat availability in shaping the phylogenetic structure of tropical reef fish assemblages.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1633
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