|   | 
Détails
   web
Enregistrements
Auteur Alfonso, S.; Blanc, M.; Joassard, L.; Keiter, S.H.; Munschy, C.; Loizeau, V.; Begout, M.-L.; Cousin, X.
Titre Examining multi- and transgenerational behavioral and molecular alterations resulting from parental exposure to an environmental PCB and PBDE mixture Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquat. Toxicol.
Volume 208 Numéro Pages 29-38
Mots-Clés adult zebrafish; Behavior; brominated flame retardants; developmental exposure; dietary-exposure; embryonic exposure; Epigenetic; Gene transcription; global dna methylation; left-right asymmetry; Offspring; Parental exposure; polybrominated diphenyl ethers; polychlorinated-biphenyls pcbs; Zebrafish; zebrafish danio-rerio
Résumé Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are persistent organic pollutants extensively used during the 20th century and still present in aquatic environments despite their ban. Effects of exposure to these compounds over generations are poorly documented. Therefore, our aims were to characterize behavioral responses and underlying molecular mechanisms in zebrafish exposed to an environmentally relevant mixture of PCBs and PBDEs as well as in four unexposed offspring generations. Zebrafish (F0) were chronically exposed from the first meal onward to a diet spiked with a mixture containing 22 PCB and 7 PBDE congeners in proportions and concentrations reflecting environmental situations (Sigma PCBs = 1991 and Sigma PBDEs = 411 ng/g). Four offspring generations (F1 to F4) were obtained from this F0 and were not further exposed. Behavior was assessed at both larval and adult stages. Mechanisms related to behavioral defects (habenula maturation and c-fos transcription) and methylation (dnmts transcription) were monitored in larvae. Exposed adult F0 as well as F1 and F3 adults displayed no behavioral change while F2 expressed anxiety-like behavior. Larval behavior was also disrupted, Le. hyperactive after light to dark transition in F1 or hypoactive in F2, F3 and F4. Behavioral disruptions may be related to defect in habenula maturation (observed in F1) and change in c-fos transcription (observed in F1 and F2). Transcription of the gene encoding DNA methyltransferase (dnmt3ba) was also modified in all generations. Our results lead us to hypothesize that chronic dietary exposure to an environmentally relevant mixture of PCB and PBDE triggers multigenerational and transgenerational molecular and behavioral disruptions in a vertebrate model.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0166-445x ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2549
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Bax, N.J.; Miloslavich, P.; Muller-Karger, F.E.; Allain, V.; Appeltans, W.; Batten, S.D.; Benedetti-Cecchi, L.; Buttigieg, P.L.; Chiba, S.; Costa, D.P.; Duffy, J.E.; Dunn, D.C.; Johnson, C.R.; Kudela, R.M.; Obura, D.; Rebelo, L.-M.; Shin, Y.-J.; Simmons, S.E.; Tyack, P.L.
Titre A Response to Scientific and Societal Needs for Marine Biological Observations Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci.
Volume 6 Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés capacity development; Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD); Essential Ocean Variables (EOV); Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS); Ocean observing; Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs); Un decade for sustainable development
Résumé Development of global ocean observing capacity for the biological EOVs is on the cusp of a step-change. Current capacity to automate data collection and processing and to integrate the resulting data streams with complementary data, openly available as FAIR data, is certain to dramatically increase the amount and quality of information and knowledge available to scientists and decision makers into the future. There is little doubt that scientists will continue to expand their understanding of what lives in the ocean, where it lives and how it is changing. However, whether this expanding information stream will inform policy and management or be incorporated into indicators for national reporting is more uncertain. Coordinated data collection including open sharing of data will help produce the consistent evidence-based messages that are valued by managers. The GOOS Biology and Ecosystems Panel is working with other global initiatives to assist this coordination by defining and implementing Essential Ocean Variables. The biological EOVs have been defined, are being updated following community feedback, and their implementation is underway. In 2019, the coverage and precision of a global ocean observing system capable of addressing key questions for the next decade will be quantified, and its potential to support the goals of the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development identified. Developing a global ocean observing system for biology and ecosystems requires parallel efforts in improving evidence-based monitoring of progress against international agreements and the open data, reporting and governance structures that would facilitate the uptake of improved information by decision makers.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2598
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Bender, M.G.; Leprieur, F.; Mouillot, D.; Kulbicki, M.; Parravicini, V.; Pie, M.R.; Barneche, D.R.; Oliveira-Santos, L.G.R.; Floeter, S.R.
Titre Isolation drives taxonomic and functional nestedness in tropical reef fish faunas Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography
Volume 40 Numéro 3 Pages 425-435
Mots-Clés assembly rules; biodiversity; communities; coral-reef; diversity; global patterns; islands; null model analysis; species richness; traits
Résumé Taxonomic nestedness, the degree to which the taxonomic composition of species-poor assemblages represents a subset of richer sites, commonly occurs in habitat fragments and islands differing in size and isolation from a source pool. However, species are not ecologically equivalent and the extent to which nestedness is observed in terms of functional trait composition of assemblages still remains poorly known. Here, using an extensive database on the functional traits and the distributions of 6316 tropical reef fish species across 169 sites, we assessed the levels of taxonomical vs functional nestedness of reef fish assemblages at the global scale. Functional nestedness was considerably more common than taxonomic nestedness, and generally associated with geographical isolation, where nested subsets are gradually more isolated from surrounding reef areas and from the center of biodiversity. Because a nested pattern in functional composition implies that certain combinations of traits may be represented by few species, we identified these groups of low redundancy that include large herbivore-detritivores and omnivores, small piscivores, and macro-algal herbivores. The identified patterns of nestedness may be an outcome of the interaction between species dispersal capabilities, resource requirements, and gradients of isolation among habitats. The importance of isolation in generating the observed pattern of functional nestedness within biogeographic regions may indicate that disturbance in depauperate and isolated sites can have disproportionate effects on the functional structure of their reef fish assemblages.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2107
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Brosse, S.; Beauchard, O.; Blanchet, S.; Dürr, H.H.; Grenouillet, G.; Hugueny, B.; Lauzeral, C.; Leprieur, F.; Tedesco, P.A.; Villeger, S.; Oberdorff, T.
Titre Fish-SPRICH: a database of freshwater fish species richness throughout the World Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Hydrobiologia
Volume 700 Numéro 1 Pages 343-349
Mots-Clés Endemic; Global extent; Native; Non-native; River drainage basin; fishes
Résumé There is growing interest in large-scale approaches to ecology, for both plants and animals. In particular, macroecological studies enable examination of the patterns and determinants of species richness of a variety of groups of organism throughout the world, which might have important implications for prediction and mitigation of the consequences of global change. Here, we provide richness data for freshwater fishes, which, with more than 13,000 described species, comprise a quarter of all vertebrate species. We conducted an extensive literature survey of native, non-native (exotic), and endemic freshwater fish species richness. The resulting database, called Fish-SPRICH, contains data from more than 400 bibliographic sources including published papers, books, and grey literature sources. Fish-SPRICH contains richness values at the river basin grain for 1,054 river basins covering more than 80% of the earth's continental surface. This database is currently the most comprehensive global database of native, non-native and endemic freshwater fish richness available at the river basin grain.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0018-8158 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 604
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Descombes, P.; Gaboriau, T.; Albouy, C.; Heine, C.; Leprieur, F.; Pellissier, L.
Titre Linking species diversification to palaeo-environmental changes: A process-based modelling approach Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.
Volume 27 Numéro 2 Pages 233-244
Mots-Clés patterns; biodiversity; latitudinal gradient; richness; diversification; climate-change; marine ecosystems; fish diversity; genetic diversity; biodiversity dynamics; extinction rates; fossils; global simulation models; mangrove; oceanic dispersal; palaeo-environments; plate-tectonics
Résumé Aim: The importance of quantifying the contribution of historical processes in shaping current biodiversity patterns is now recognized, but quantitative approaches that explicitly link speciation, extinction and dispersal processes to palaeo-environmental changes are currently lacking. Here, we propose a spatial diversification model of lineages through time (SPLIT) based on the reconstruction of palaeo-environments. We illustrate our approach using mangroves as a case study and evaluate whether habitat changes caused by plate tectonics explain the current biodiversity patterns of this group. Innovations: The SPLIT model allows one to simulate the evolutionary dynamics of species ranges by spatially linking speciation, extinction and dispersal processes to habitat changes over geological time periods. The SPLIT model provides a mechanistic expectation of speciation and extinction assuming that species are ecologically identical and not interacting. The likelihood of speciation and extinction is equivalent across species and depends on two dispersal parameters interacting with habitat dynamics (d a maximum dispersal distance and ds a distance threshold beyond which gene flow is absent). Beyond classical correlative approaches, this model tracks biodiversity dynamics under palaeo-environmental changes and provides multiple expectations (i.e., alpha-, beta-diversity, phylogenies) that can be compared to empirical patterns. Main conclusions: The SPLIT model allows a better understanding of the origin of biodiversity by explicitly accounting for habitat changes over geological times. The simulations applied to the mangrove case study reproduced the observed longitudinal gradient in species richness, the empirical pattern of beta-diversity and also provided inference on diversification rates. Future developments may include niche evolution and species interactions to evaluate the importance of non-neutral mechanisms. The method is fully implemented in the InsideDNA platform for bioinformatics analyses, and all modelling results can be accessed via interactive web links.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2284
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement