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Auteur (down) Guilhaumon, F.; Krasnov, B.R.; Poulin, R.; Shenbrot, G.I.; Mouillot, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Latitudinal mismatches between the components of mammal-flea interaction networks Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 21 Numéro 7 Pages 725-731  
  Mots-Clés Carrying capacity; biodiversity; carnivores; communities; diversity gradient; evolutionary; fleas; geographical variation; global patterns; host-parasite; interaction network; latitudinal gradient; mammals; niche breadth; richness; species-area relationships  
  Résumé Aim The large-scale description of ecosystem complexity, including the structure of interaction networks, has been largely overlooked although it is known to underpin species co-occurrences and their robustness to climatic or anthropogenic disturbances. Here, we investigated whether the various components of mammalflea interaction networks (richness of fleas, richness of mammals and the richness of mammalflea associations) are spatially congruent and follow the latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG). Location Sixteen regions, world-wide. Methods We first took into account the effect of area on diversity by determining the position of regions with respect to speciesarea relationships. We then investigated the spatial congruence between the regional richness of each component of mammalflea interaction networks as well as their latitudinal gradients. We further investigated patterns for fleahost associations by testing for relationships between mammalflea interaction richness and (1) flea niche breadth and (2) host carrying capacity. Results We report divergent LDGs for the different components of mammalflea interaction networks: our data agree with a canonical LDG for mammals, but reveal that the diversity of fleas and mammalflea associations do not follow such a classical gradient. Our results suggest that host carrying capacity is more likely than flea niche breadth to modulate the number of links in hostparasite interaction networks. Main conclusions The complex interplay between geographic variation in host diversity and both host and parasite traits can lead to unexpected spatial patterns such as the invalidation of expected parasites and links in hostparasite web LDGs. Beyond our focus on hostparasite interactions, our study is among the first in the emerging field of interaction network macroecology and paves the way for other components of ecological networks to be investigated across space and time.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 708  
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Auteur (down) Canard, E.F.; Mouquet, N.; Mouillot, D.; Stanko, M.; Miklisova, D.; Gravel, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Empirical Evaluation of Neutral Interactions in Host-Parasite Networks Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée American Naturalist  
  Volume 183 Numéro 4 Pages 468-479  
  Mots-Clés abundance; animal mutualistic networks; community; dissimilarity; effort; food-web structure; geographical variation; host-parasite network; network structure; neutrality; null model; phylogenetic signal; reconciling niche; sampling; scale-dependence; species abundance distribution  
  Résumé While niche-based processes have been invoked extensively to explain the structure of interaction networks, recent studies propose that neutrality could also be of great importance. Under the neutral hypothesis, network structure would simply emerge from random encounters between individuals and thus would be directly linked to species abundance. We investigated the impact of species abundance distributions on qualitative and quantitative metrics of 113 host-parasite networks. We analyzed the concordance between neutral expectations and empirical observations at interaction, species, and network levels. We found that species abundance accurately predicts network metrics at all levels. Despite host-parasite systems being constrained by physiology and immunology, our results suggest that neutrality could also explain, at least partially, their structure. We hypothesize that trait matching would determine potential interactions between species, while abundance would determine their realization.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0003-0147 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 573  
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