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Auteur Guinand, B.; Chauvel, C.; Lechene, M.; Tournois, J.; Tsigenopoulos, C.S.; Darnaude, A.M.; McKenzie, D.J.; Gagnaire, P.A.
Titre Candidate gene variation in gilthead sea bream reveals complex spatiotemporal selection patterns between marine and lagoon habitats Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Ecology Progress Series
Volume 558 Numéro Pages 115-127
Mots-Clés Amplicon sequencing; Candidate gene; Genetic differentiation; Growth hormone; Local selection; Prolactin
Résumé In marine fishes, the extent to which spatial patterns induced by selection remain stable across generations remains largely unknown. In the gilthead sea bream Sparus aurata, polymorphisms in the growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (Prl) genes can display high levels of differentiation between marine and lagoon habitats. These genotype-environment associations have been attributed to differential selection following larval settlement, but it remains unclear whether selective mortality during later juvenile stages further shapes genetic differences among habitats. We addressed this question by analysing differentiation patterns at GH and Prl markers together with a set of 21 putatively neutral microsatellite loci. We compared genetic variation of spring juveniles that had just settled in 3 ecologically different lagoons against older juveniles sampled from the same sites in autumn, at the onset of winter outmigration. In spring, genetic differentiation among lagoons was greater than expected from neutrality for both candidate gene markers. Surprisingly, this signal disappeared completely in the older juveniles, with no significant differentiation for either locus a few months later in autumn. We searched for signals of haplotype structure within GH and Prl genes using next-generation amplicon deep sequencing. Both genes contained 2 groups of haplotypes, but high similarities among groups indicated that signatures of selection, if any, had largely been erased by recombination. Our results are consistent with the view that differential selection operates during early juvenile life in sea bream and highlight the importance of temporal replication in studies of post-settlement selection in marine fish.
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ISSN 0171-8630, 1616-1599 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2239
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Auteur Valladares, F.; Matesanz, S.; Guilhaumon, F.; Araujo, M.B.; Balaguer, L.; Benito-Garzon, M.; Cornwell, W.; Gianoli, E.; van Kleunen, M.; Naya, D.E.; Nicotra, A.B.; Poorter, H.; Zavala, M.A.
Titre The effects of phenotypic plasticity and local adaptation on forecasts of species range shifts under climate change Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology Letters
Volume 17 Numéro 11 Pages 1351-1364
Mots-Clés change impacts; climate change; climate variability hypothesis; ecological niche models; edge populations; environments; evolution; genetic differentiation; global change; intraspecific variation; local adaptation; niche; phenotypic plasticity; population differentiation; quercus-coccifera; reaction norms; thermal tolerance; tree populations
Résumé Species are the unit of analysis in many global change and conservation biology studies; however, species are not uniform entities but are composed of different, sometimes locally adapted, populations differing in plasticity. We examined how intraspecific variation in thermal niches and phenotypic plasticity will affect species distributions in a warming climate. We first developed a conceptual model linking plasticity and niche breadth, providing five alternative intraspecific scenarios that are consistent with existing literature. Secondly, we used ecological niche-modeling techniques to quantify the impact of each intraspecific scenario on the distribution of a virtual species across a geographically realistic setting. Finally, we performed an analogous modeling exercise using real data on the climatic niches of different tree provenances. We show that when population differentiation is accounted for and dispersal is restricted, forecasts of species range shifts under climate change are even more pessimistic than those using the conventional assumption of homogeneously high plasticity across a species' range. Suitable population-level data are not available for most species so identifying general patterns of population differentiation could fill this gap. However, the literature review revealed contrasting patterns among species, urging greater levels of integration among empirical, modeling and theoretical research on intraspecific phenotypic variation.
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ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium
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Notes <p>ISI Document Delivery No.: AT8YX<br/>Times Cited: 4<br/>Cited Reference Count: 80<br/>Valladares, Fernando Matesanz, Silvia Guilhaumon, Francois Araujo, Miguel B. Balaguer, Luis Benito-Garzon, Marta Cornwell, Will Gianoli, Ernesto van Kleunen, Mark Naya, Daniel E. Nicotra, Adrienne B. Poorter, Hendrik Zavala, Miguel A.<br/>Spanish Ministry for Innovation and Science with the grant Consolider Montes [CSD2008 00040]; Community of Madrid grant REMEDINAL 2 [CM S2009 AMB 1783]; CYTED network ECONS [410RT0406]; Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness [1/SAE-SCTN/ALENT-07-0224-FEDER-001755, CGL2011-26852]<br/>This work was supported by the Spanish Ministry for Innovation and Science with the grant Consolider Montes [CSD2008 00040], the Community of Madrid grant REMEDINAL 2 [CM S2009 AMB 1783], and CYTED network ECONS (410RT0406). The Pinus sylvestris provenance tests used in this research are part of the Spanish Network of Genetic Trials (GENFORED). We thank all those involved in the establishment, maintenance and measurement of the trials. MBA also thanks the Portuguese IC&DT Call No 1/SAE-SCTN/ALENT-07-0224-FEDER-001755 and CGL2011-26852 project of the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness for support of his research.<br/>Wiley-blackwell<br/>Hoboken</p> Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1176
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Auteur Viricel, A.; Simon-Bouhet, B.; Ceyrac, L.; Dulau-Drouot, V.; Berggren, P.; Amir, O.A.; Jiddawi, N.S.; Mongin, P.; Kiszka, J.J.
Titre Habitat availability and geographic isolation as potential drivers of population structure in an oceanic dolphin in the Southwest Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Biol.
Volume 163 Numéro 10 Pages 219
Mots-Clés biologically meaningful; bottle-nosed dolphins; genetic differentiation; marine populations; megaptera-novaeangliae; microsatellite loci; mozambique channel; spinner dolphins; stenella-longirostris; tursiops-truncatus
Résumé Delphinid populations show highly variable patterns of genetic diversity and population structure. Previous studies indicate that habitat discontinuities and geographic isolation are major drivers of population division in cetaceans. Spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) are distributed in all tropical oceans, but they are particularly common around islands and atolls. This species occurs in shallow waters at daytime to rest and socialise, and feeds on offshore mesopelagic prey overnight. Here, we investigated the genetic population structure of spinner dolphins in the Southwest Indian Ocean along a west-east geographic gradient, from eastern Africa to the Mascarene archipelago. We combined analyses of 12 microsatellite loci, mtDNA control region sequences, and sighting data to assess genetic differentiation and characterise habitat preferences of these populations. Significant genetic structure among the three sampled sites (Zanzibar, Mayotte and La Reunion) was observed using both types of molecular markers. Overall, our results indicate that geographic isolation and potentially other factors, such as shallow-water habitats to rest and socialise, may be important drivers of the genetic population structure of insular spinner dolphins in this region.
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ISSN 0025-3162 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1700
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