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Auteur Wasof, S.; Lenoir, J.; Hattab, T.; Jamoneau, A.; Gallet-Moron, E.; Ampoorter, E.; Saguez, R.; Bennsadek, L.; Bertrand, R.; Valdes, A.; Verheyen, K.; Decocq, G. doi  openurl
  Titre Dominance of individual plant species is more important than diversity in explaining plant biomass in the forest understorey Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Veg. Sci.  
  Volume 29 Numéro 3 Pages 521-531  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; biomass; biomass ratio hypothesis; community biomass; current knowledge; deciduous forests; ecosystem productivity; forest understorey; functional diversity; ivy; multiple traits; niche conservatism; phylogenetic diversity; phylogeny; production; richness  
  Résumé QuestionsHow does plant community diversity influence variation in plant biomass? There are two competing hypotheses: the biomass ratio' hypothesis, where biomass is influenced by the abundance and traits of the most dominant species, and the diversity' hypothesis, where the diversity of organisms influences biomass through mechanisms such as niche complementarity. However, no studies have tested which one of these two hypotheses better explains the variation in plant biomass in the forest understorey. LocationTemperate deciduous forests in northern France. MethodsFor the forest understorey, we assessed species diversity and biomass as well as soil and light conditions in 133 forest plots of 100m(2) each. Using mixed-effect models and after controlling for potential confounding factors, we tested the biomass ratio' hypothesis by relating the relative abundance of the most dominant species across our study sites and the CWM of plant traits (leaf area and plant height) to biomass. The diversity' hypothesis was tested by relating biomass to various measures of taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic diversity. ResultsBiomass of the forest understorey was mainly related to the relative abundance and the trait values of the most dominant species, supporting the biomass ratio' hypothesis. In contrast to the diversity' hypothesis, functional diversity indices had a negative impact on biomass. We found no contribution of taxonomic or phylogenetic diversity indices. ConclusionThe abundance and traits of the most dominant species matter more than taxonomic, functional or phylogenetic diversity of the forest understorey in explaining its biomass. Thus, there is a need for experiments that aim to fully understand keystone species' responses to on-going changing biotic and abiotic conditions and to predict their effects on ecosystem functioning and processes.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1100-9233 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2397  
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Auteur Barnagaud, J.-Y.; Kissling, W.D.; Tsirogiannis, C.; Fisikopoulos, V.; Villeger, S.; Sekercioglu, C.H.; Svenning, J.-C. doi  openurl
  Titre Biogeographical, environmental and anthropogenic determinants of global patterns in bird taxonomic and trait turnover Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 26 Numéro 10 Pages 1190-1200  
  Mots-Clés Anthropocene; Beta diversity; Beta-diversity; biogeographical legacies; biotic homogenization; climate changes; community; components; dispersal; functional diversity; functional diversity; life-history traits; mammal assemblages; net primary production; regional assemblages; specialization; species richness  
  Résumé AimTo assess contemporary and historical determinants of taxonomic and ecological trait turnover in birds worldwide. We tested whether taxonomic and trait turnover (1) are structured by regional bioclimatic conditions, (2) increase in relationship with topographic heterogeneity and environmental turnover and change according to current and historical environmental conditions, and (3) decrease with human impact. Major TaxaBirds. LocationGlobal. MethodsWe used computationally efficient algorithms to map the taxonomic and trait turnover of 8,040 terrestrial bird assemblages worldwide, based on a grid with 110km x 110 km resolution overlaid on the extent-of-occurrence maps of 7,964 bird species, and nine ecological traits reflecting six key aspects of bird ecology (diet, habitat use, thermal preference, migration, dispersal and body size). We used quantile regression and model selection to quantify the influence of biomes, environment (temperature, precipitation, altitudinal range, net primary productivity, Quaternary temperature and precipitation change) and human impact (human influence index) on bird turnover. ResultsBird taxonomic and trait turnover were highest in the north African deserts and boreal biomes. In the tropics, taxonomic turnover tended to be higher, but trait turnover was lower than in other biomes. Taxonomic and trait turnover exhibited markedly different or even opposing relationships with climatic and topographic gradients, but at their upper quantiles both types of turnover decreased with increasing human influence. Main conclusionsThe influence of regional, environmental and anthropogenic factors differ between bird taxonomic and trait turnover, consistent with an imprint of niche conservatism, environmental filtering and topographic barriers on bird regional assemblages. Human influence on these patterns is pervasive and demonstrates global biotic homogenization at a macroecological scale.  
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  ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2212  
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Auteur Seddon, N.; Mace, G.M.; Naeem, S.; Tobias, J.A.; Pigot, A.L.; Cavanagh, R.; Mouillot, D.; Vause, J.; Walpole, M. doi  openurl
  Titre Biodiversity in the Anthropocene: prospects and policy Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.  
  Volume 283 Numéro 1844 Pages 20162094  
  Mots-Clés environment; productivity; functional diversity; ecosystem; conservation; land-use; species richness; extinction; ecosystem services; plant diversity; values; biodiversity services; ecological resilience; interdisciplinary; sustainable development  
  Résumé Meeting the ever-increasing needs of the Earth's human population without excessively reducing biological diversity is one of the greatest challenges facing humanity, suggesting that newapproaches to biodiversity conservation are required. One idea rapidly gaining momentum-as well as opposition-is to incorporate the values of biodiversity into decision-making using economic methods. Here, we develop several lines of argument for how biodiversity might be valued, building on recent developments in natural science, economics and science-policy processes. Then we provide a synoptic guide to the papers in this special feature, summarizing recent research advances relevant to biodiversity valuation and management. Current evidence suggests that more biodiverse systems have greater stability and resilience, and that by maximizing key components of biodiversity we maximize an ecosystem's long-term value. Moreover, many services and values arising from biodiversity are interdependent, and often poorly captured by standard economic models. We conclude that economic valuation approaches to biodiversity conservation should (i) account for interdependency and (ii) complement rather than replace traditional approaches. To identify possible solutions, we present a framework for understanding the foundational role of hard-to-quantify ` biodiversity services' in sustaining the value of ecosystems to humanity, and then use this framework to highlight new directions for pure and applied research. In most cases, clarifying the links between biodiversity and ecosystem services, and developing effective policy and practice for managing biodiversity, will require a genuinely interdisciplinary approach.  
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  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2248  
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Auteur Mouillot, D.; Parravicini, V.; Bellwood, D.R.; Leprieur, F.; Huang, D.; Cowman, P.F.; Albouy, C.; Hughes, T.P.; Thuiller, W.; Guilhaumon, F. doi  openurl
  Titre Global marine protected areas do not secure the evolutionary history of tropical corals and fishes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat. Commun.  
  Volume 7 Numéro Pages 10359  
  Mots-Clés Biodiversity; conservation; extinction risk; functional diversity; management; patterns; phylogenetic diversity; reef fisheries; species richness; vulnerability  
  Résumé Although coral reefs support the largest concentrations of marine biodiversity worldwide, the extent to which the global system of marine-protected areas (MPAs) represents individual species and the breadth of evolutionary history across the Tree of Life has never been quantified. Here we show that only 5.7% of scleractinian coral species and 21.7% of labrid fish species reach the minimum protection target of 10% of their geographic ranges within MPAs. We also estimate that the current global MPA system secures only 1.7% of the Tree of Life for corals, and 17.6% for fishes. Regionally, the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific show the greatest deficit of protection for corals while for fishes this deficit is located primarily in the Western Indian Ocean and in the Central Pacific. Our results call for a global coordinated expansion of current conservation efforts to fully secure the Tree of Life on coral reefs.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1506  
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Auteur Colin, N.; Villeger, S.; Wilkes, M.; de Sostoa, A.; Maceda-Veiga, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Functional diversity measures revealed impacts of non-native species and habitat degradation on species-poor freshwater fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci. Total Environ.  
  Volume 625 Numéro Pages 861-871  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; ecosystems; community; life-history traits; Non-native species; 4th-corner problem; Functional diversity; Fish assemblages; Biomonitoring; ecological quality; flow regime; Human disturbance; mediterranean rivers; Mediterranean rivers; stream; traits-environment relationships  
  Résumé Trail-based ecology has been developed for decades lo infer ecosystem responses to stressors based on the functional structure of communities, yet its value in species-poor systems is largely unknown. Here, we used an extensive clataset in a Spanish region highly prone to non-native fish invasions (15 catchments, N 389 sites) to assess for the first time how species-poor communities respond to large-scale environmental gradients using a taxonomic and functional trait-based approach in riverine fish. We examined total species richness and three functional trait-based indices available when many sites have <= 3 species (specialization, FSpe; onginaliy, FOri and entropy, FEnt). We assessed the responses of these taxonomic and functional indices along gradients of altitude, water pollution, physical habitat degradation and non-native fish biomass. Whilst species richness was relatively sensitive to spatial effects, functional diversity indices were responsive across natural and anthropogenic gradients. All four diversity measures declined with altitude but this decline was modulated by physical habitat degradation (richness, FSpe and FEnt) and the non-native total fish biomass ratio (FSpe and FOri) in ways that varied between indices. Furthermore, FSpe and FOri were significantly correlated with Total Nitrogen. Non-native fish were a major component of the taxonomic and functional structure of fish communities, raising concerns about potential misdiagnosis between invaded and environmentally-degraded river reaches. Such misdiagnosis was evident in a regional fish index widely used in official monitoring programs. We recommend the application of FSpe and FOri to extensive clatasets from monitoring programs in order to generate valuable cross-system information about the impacts of non-native species and habitat degradation, even in species-poor systems. Scoring non-native species apart from habitat degradation in the indices used to determine ecosystem health is essential to develop better management strategies. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.  
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  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2309  
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