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Auteur Zhao, T.; Villeger, S.; Cucherousset, J. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) Accounting for intraspecific diversity when examining relationships between non-native species and functional diversity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Oecologia  
  Volume 189 Numéro 1 Pages 171-183  
  Mots-Clés fish; Intraspecific variability; size; disturbance; Non-native species; phenotypic plasticity; Functional diversity; reveals; catfish silurus-glanis; coexistence; Community assembly; energy relationships; Functional traits; success; trait variability  
  Résumé Quantifying changes in functional diversity, the facet of biodiversity accounting for the biological features of organisms, has been advocated as one of the most integrative ways to unravel how communities are affected by human-induced perturbations. The present study assessed how functional diversity patterns varied among communities that differed in the degree to which non-native species dominated the community in temperate lake fish communities and whether accounting for intraspecific functional variability could provide a better understanding of the variation of functional diversity across communities. Four functional diversity indices were computed for 18 temperate lake fish communities along a gradient of non-native fish dominance using morphological functional traits assessed for each life-stage within each species. First, we showed that intraspecific variability in functional traits was high and comparable to interspecific variability. Second, we found that non-native fish were functionally distinct from native fish. Finally, we demonstrated that there was a significant relationship between functional diversity and the degree to which non-native fish currently dominated the community and that this association could be better detected when accounting for intraspecific functional variability. These findings highlighted the importance of incorporating intraspecific variability to better quantify the variation of functional diversity patterns in communities facing human-induced perturbations.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0029-8549 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2479  
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Auteur Carteron, A.; Jeanmougin, M.; Leprieur, F.; Spatharis, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Assessing the efficiency of clustering algorithms and goodness-of-fit measures using phytoplankton field data Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Inform.  
  Volume 9 Numéro Pages 64-68  
  Mots-Clés 2-norm; Beta diversity; Cophenetic correlation coefficient; Dendrogram; Upgma; Ward's algorithm; beta-diversity; blooms; classification; communities; cophenetic correlation; environment; forest; functional diversity; som  
  Résumé Investigation of patterns in beta diversity has received increased attention over the last years particularly in light of new ecological theories such as the metapopulation paradigm and metacommunity theory. Traditionally, beta diversity patterns can be described by cluster analysis (i.e. dendrograms) that enables the classification of samples. Clustering algorithms define the structure of dendrograms, consequently assessing their performance is crucial. A common, although not always appropriate approach for assessing algorithm suitability is the cophenetic correlation coefficient c. Alternatively the 2-norm has been recently proposed as an increasingly informative method for evaluating the distortion engendered by clustering algorithms. In the present work, the 2-norm is applied for the first time on field data and is compared with the cophenetic correlation coefficient using a set of 105 pairwise combinations of 7 clustering methods (e.g. UPGMA) and 15 (dis)similarity/distance indices (e.g. Jaccard index). In contrast to the 2-norm, cophenetic correlation coefficient does not provide a clear indication on the efficiency of the clustering algorithms for all combinations. The two approaches were not always in agreement in the choice of the most faithful algorithm. Additionally, the 2-norm revealed that UPGMA is the most efficient clustering algorithm and Ward's the least. The present results suggest that goodness-of-fit measures such as the 2-norm should be applied prior to clustering analyses for reliable beta diversity measures. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1574-9541 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 457  
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Auteur Loiseau, N.; Gaertner, J.-C.; Kulbicki, M.; Mérigot, B.; Legras, G.; Taquet, M.; Gaertner-Mazouni, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Assessing the multicomponent aspect of coral fish diversity: The impact of sampling unit dimensions Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecological Indicators  
  Volume 60 Numéro Pages 815-823  
  Mots-Clés Evenness; Functional diversity; Index sensitivity; Sampling unit dimensions; species richness; Visual censuses  
  Résumé The influence of variations in sampling unit dimensions on the assessment of fish species structuring has been widely documented. However, this issue has been restricted to a very limited range of community and population indices (mainly species richness and density). Here, we have investigated this issue through the analysis of 13 diversity indices related to 3 diversity components (number of species, evenness and functional diversity). We analyzed a large set of 257 standardized underwater visual census (UVC) transects dealing with 254 coral fish species. The sensitivity of the indices to the variation in sampling unit dimensions was studied by comparing a range of 55 couples of transect length and width representing 34 sampling surfaces. We found that the extent and profile of the sensitivity to changes in transect dimensions strongly varied both from one index to another and from one dimension to another (length and width). The most sensitive indices were more strongly impacted by variation in length than width. We also showed that for a fixed transect surface, the couple of chosen length and width may alter the assessment of indices related to each of the three main diversity components studied. Some widely used diversity indices, such as species richness and Shannon index, appeared to be very sensitive to changes in transect length and width. In contrast, while still very little used in coral fish studies, two functional diversity indices (FDiv, FEve), and to a lesser extent an evenness index (Berger–Parker), remained robust in the face of change in sampling dimensions. By showing that the variation in sampling dimensions (length, width and surface) may impact diversity indices in a contrasting manner, we stress the need to take into account the sensitivity of the indices to this criterion in the process of selection of the indices to be analyzed in diversity studies. Finally, we found that 30 m long*5 m wide transects might be a suitable compromise size for assessing the patterns of each of the three major complementary components of coral fish diversity.  
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  ISSN 1470-160x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1320  
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Auteur Seddon, N.; Mace, G.M.; Naeem, S.; Tobias, J.A.; Pigot, A.L.; Cavanagh, R.; Mouillot, D.; Vause, J.; Walpole, M. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) Biodiversity in the Anthropocene: prospects and policy Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.  
  Volume 283 Numéro 1844 Pages 20162094  
  Mots-Clés environment; productivity; functional diversity; ecosystem; conservation; land-use; species richness; extinction; ecosystem services; plant diversity; values; biodiversity services; ecological resilience; interdisciplinary; sustainable development  
  Résumé Meeting the ever-increasing needs of the Earth's human population without excessively reducing biological diversity is one of the greatest challenges facing humanity, suggesting that newapproaches to biodiversity conservation are required. One idea rapidly gaining momentum-as well as opposition-is to incorporate the values of biodiversity into decision-making using economic methods. Here, we develop several lines of argument for how biodiversity might be valued, building on recent developments in natural science, economics and science-policy processes. Then we provide a synoptic guide to the papers in this special feature, summarizing recent research advances relevant to biodiversity valuation and management. Current evidence suggests that more biodiverse systems have greater stability and resilience, and that by maximizing key components of biodiversity we maximize an ecosystem's long-term value. Moreover, many services and values arising from biodiversity are interdependent, and often poorly captured by standard economic models. We conclude that economic valuation approaches to biodiversity conservation should (i) account for interdependency and (ii) complement rather than replace traditional approaches. To identify possible solutions, we present a framework for understanding the foundational role of hard-to-quantify ` biodiversity services' in sustaining the value of ecosystems to humanity, and then use this framework to highlight new directions for pure and applied research. In most cases, clarifying the links between biodiversity and ecosystem services, and developing effective policy and practice for managing biodiversity, will require a genuinely interdisciplinary approach.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2248  
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Auteur Barnagaud, J.-Y.; Kissling, W.D.; Tsirogiannis, C.; Fisikopoulos, V.; Villeger, S.; Sekercioglu, C.H.; Svenning, J.-C. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) Biogeographical, environmental and anthropogenic determinants of global patterns in bird taxonomic and trait turnover Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 26 Numéro 10 Pages 1190-1200  
  Mots-Clés Anthropocene; Beta diversity; Beta-diversity; biogeographical legacies; biotic homogenization; climate changes; community; components; dispersal; functional diversity; functional diversity; life-history traits; mammal assemblages; net primary production; regional assemblages; specialization; species richness  
  Résumé AimTo assess contemporary and historical determinants of taxonomic and ecological trait turnover in birds worldwide. We tested whether taxonomic and trait turnover (1) are structured by regional bioclimatic conditions, (2) increase in relationship with topographic heterogeneity and environmental turnover and change according to current and historical environmental conditions, and (3) decrease with human impact. Major TaxaBirds. LocationGlobal. MethodsWe used computationally efficient algorithms to map the taxonomic and trait turnover of 8,040 terrestrial bird assemblages worldwide, based on a grid with 110km x 110 km resolution overlaid on the extent-of-occurrence maps of 7,964 bird species, and nine ecological traits reflecting six key aspects of bird ecology (diet, habitat use, thermal preference, migration, dispersal and body size). We used quantile regression and model selection to quantify the influence of biomes, environment (temperature, precipitation, altitudinal range, net primary productivity, Quaternary temperature and precipitation change) and human impact (human influence index) on bird turnover. ResultsBird taxonomic and trait turnover were highest in the north African deserts and boreal biomes. In the tropics, taxonomic turnover tended to be higher, but trait turnover was lower than in other biomes. Taxonomic and trait turnover exhibited markedly different or even opposing relationships with climatic and topographic gradients, but at their upper quantiles both types of turnover decreased with increasing human influence. Main conclusionsThe influence of regional, environmental and anthropogenic factors differ between bird taxonomic and trait turnover, consistent with an imprint of niche conservatism, environmental filtering and topographic barriers on bird regional assemblages. Human influence on these patterns is pervasive and demonstrates global biotic homogenization at a macroecological scale.  
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  ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2212  
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