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Auteur Pool, T.K.; Cucherousset, J.; Boulêtreau, S.; Villeger, S.; Strecker, A.L.; Grenouillet, G. url  doi
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  Titre Increased taxonomic and functional similarity does not increase the trophic similarity of communities Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Biogeography  
  Volume 25 Numéro 1 Pages 46-54  
  Mots-Clés Alpha diversity; Beta diversity; compositional similarity; functional diversity; trophic diversity  
  Résumé Aim Despite a long-standing research interest in the association between the biodiversity (i.e. taxonomic and functional composition) and trophic structure of communities, our understanding of the relationship remains limited. Community assembly theory predicts that niche partitioning will result in communities with a diverse array of functional traits, which in turn may facilitate a correspondingly diverse array of trophic interactions that define the trophic niche of those communities. The aim of our study is to test this prediction. Location North America. Methods We built a database composed of functional traits and stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N) for 63 freshwater fish communities containing 109 species in 34 lentic and 29 lotic ecosystems. First, using linear mixed models (i.e. an alpha-diversity approach), we tested whether the taxonomic diversity of communities was positively associated with their functional diversity and if their functional diversity was positively associated with their trophic diversity. Second, we assessed the taxonomic, functional and trophic similarity of communities using multiple regression on distance matrices (MRM) and their respective ‘turnover’ and ‘nestedness-resultant’ components to test if the taxonomic similarity of communities was positively correlated with their functional similarity and if their functional similarity was positively associated with their trophic similarity (i.e. a beta-diversity approach). Results We found that the functional diversity of communities increased as their taxonomic diversity increased. Similarly, the trophic diversity of communities increased as their functional diversity increased. The pairwise taxonomic and functional similarity of communities were also positively associated, but there was a weak relationship between the functional and trophic similarities of communities. Main conclusions Our study demonstrates that communities with similar functional characteristics can have disparate food web structures, suggesting that additional site-specific factors influence community variation in trophic niche geometry. Determining the relative importance of functional characteristics and site-specific factors in shaping trophic interactions is crucial for a better understanding of how future species loss and species introductions will affect food web structure and ecosystem functioning.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-8238 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1540  
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Auteur Colin, N.; Villeger, S.; Wilkes, M.; de Sostoa, A.; Maceda-Veiga, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Functional diversity measures revealed impacts of non-native species and habitat degradation on species-poor freshwater fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Sci. Total Environ.  
  Volume 625 Numéro Pages 861-871  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; ecosystems; community; life-history traits; Non-native species; 4th-corner problem; Functional diversity; Fish assemblages; Biomonitoring; ecological quality; flow regime; Human disturbance; mediterranean rivers; Mediterranean rivers; stream; traits-environment relationships  
  Résumé Trail-based ecology has been developed for decades lo infer ecosystem responses to stressors based on the functional structure of communities, yet its value in species-poor systems is largely unknown. Here, we used an extensive clataset in a Spanish region highly prone to non-native fish invasions (15 catchments, N 389 sites) to assess for the first time how species-poor communities respond to large-scale environmental gradients using a taxonomic and functional trait-based approach in riverine fish. We examined total species richness and three functional trait-based indices available when many sites have <= 3 species (specialization, FSpe; onginaliy, FOri and entropy, FEnt). We assessed the responses of these taxonomic and functional indices along gradients of altitude, water pollution, physical habitat degradation and non-native fish biomass. Whilst species richness was relatively sensitive to spatial effects, functional diversity indices were responsive across natural and anthropogenic gradients. All four diversity measures declined with altitude but this decline was modulated by physical habitat degradation (richness, FSpe and FEnt) and the non-native total fish biomass ratio (FSpe and FOri) in ways that varied between indices. Furthermore, FSpe and FOri were significantly correlated with Total Nitrogen. Non-native fish were a major component of the taxonomic and functional structure of fish communities, raising concerns about potential misdiagnosis between invaded and environmentally-degraded river reaches. Such misdiagnosis was evident in a regional fish index widely used in official monitoring programs. We recommend the application of FSpe and FOri to extensive clatasets from monitoring programs in order to generate valuable cross-system information about the impacts of non-native species and habitat degradation, even in species-poor systems. Scoring non-native species apart from habitat degradation in the indices used to determine ecosystem health is essential to develop better management strategies. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.  
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  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Médium  
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Auteur Oikonomou, A.; Leprieur, F.; Leonardos, I.D. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecomorphological diversity of freshwater fishes as a tool for conservation priority setting: a case study from a Balkan hotspot Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Environ. Biol. Fishes  
  Volume 101 Numéro 7 Pages 1121-1136  
  Mots-Clés assemblages; Balkan peninsula; communities; Conservation; Ecomorphology; environmental-factors; Freshwater fishes; functional diversity; future challenges; habitat gradients; life-history strategies; Originality; species richness; stream; traits  
  Résumé Biodiversity studies commonly focus on taxonomic diversity measures such as species richness and abundance. However, alternative measures based on ecomorphological traits are also critical for unveiling the processes shaping biodiversity and community assembly along environmental gradients. Our study presents the first analysis of habitat-trait-community structure in a Balkan biodiversity hotspot (Louros river, NW Greece), through the investigation of the relationships among freshwater fish assemblages' composition, morphological traits and habitat features. In order to provide a hierarchical classification of species' priority to protection measures, we highlight the most ecomorphologically distinct species using originality analysis. Our results suggest that the longitudinal changes of habitat variables (water temperature, depth, substrate, altitude) drive the local fish assemblages' structure highlighting the upstream-downstream gradient. We also present evidence for environmental filtering, establishing fish assemblages according to their ecomorphological traits. The calculation of the seven available indices of ecomorphological originality indicates that Valencia letourneuxi and Cobitis hellenica, which are endemic to Louros and threatened with extinction, exhibited the highest distinctiveness; thus their protection is of great importance. The methodological approach followed and the patterns described herein can contribute further to the application of community ecology theory to conservation, highlighting the need to use ecomorphological traits as a useful 'tool'.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0378-1909 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2379  
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Auteur Zupan, L.; Cabeza, M.; Maiorano, L.; Roquet, C.; Devictor, V.; Lavergne, S.; Mouillot, D.; Mouquet, N.; Renaud, J.; Thuiller, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Spatial mismatch of phylogenetic diversity across three vertebrate groups and protected areas in Europe Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Diversity and Distributions  
  Volume 20 Numéro 6 Pages 674-685  
  Mots-Clés Europe; Species diversity; approach; biodiversity; climate-change; communities; ecological; evolutionary diversity; functional diversity; global patterns; hotspots; nature conservation; phylogenetic diversity; protected areas; spatial biodiversity congruence; species richness; terrestrial vertebrates; unified  
  Résumé Aim We investigate patterns of phylogenetic diversity in relation to species diversity for European birds, mammals and amphibians to evaluate their congruence and highlight areas of particular evolutionary history. We estimate the extent to which the European network of protected areas (PAs) network retains interesting evolutionary history areas for the three groups separately and simultaneously. Location Europe Methods Phylogenetic (QE(PD)) and species diversity (SD) were estimated using the Rao's quadratic entropy at 10 ' resolution. We determined the regional relationship between QE(PD) and SD for each taxa with a spatial regression model and used the tails of the residuals (QE(RES)) distribution to identify areas of higher and lower QE(PD) than predicted. Spatial congruence of biodiversity between groups was assessed with Pearson correlation coefficient. A simple classification scheme allowed building a convergence map where a convergent pixel equalled to a QE(RES) value of the same sign for the three groups. This convergence map was overlaid to the current PAs network to estimate the level of protection in convergent pixels and compared it to a null expectation built on 1000 randomization of PAs over the landscape. Results QE(RES) patterns across vertebrates show a strong spatial mismatch highlighting different evolutionary histories. Convergent areas represent only 2.7% of the Western Palearctic, with only 8.4% of these areas being covered by the current PAs network while a random distribution would retain 10.4% of them. QE(RES) are unequally represented within PAs: areas with higher QE(PD) than predicted are better covered than expected, while low QE(PD) areas are undersampled. Main conclusions Patterns of diversity strongly diverge between groups of vertebrates in Europe. Although Europe has the world's most extensive PAs network, evolutionary history of terrestrial vertebrates is unequally protected. The challenge is now to reconcile effective conservation planning with a contemporary view of biodiversity integrating multiple facets.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1366-9516 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 856  
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Auteur Wasof, S.; Lenoir, J.; Hattab, T.; Jamoneau, A.; Gallet-Moron, E.; Ampoorter, E.; Saguez, R.; Bennsadek, L.; Bertrand, R.; Valdes, A.; Verheyen, K.; Decocq, G. doi  openurl
  Titre Dominance of individual plant species is more important than diversity in explaining plant biomass in the forest understorey Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée J. Veg. Sci.  
  Volume 29 Numéro 3 Pages 521-531  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; biomass; biomass ratio hypothesis; community biomass; current knowledge; deciduous forests; ecosystem productivity; forest understorey; functional diversity; ivy; multiple traits; niche conservatism; phylogenetic diversity; phylogeny; production; richness  
  Résumé QuestionsHow does plant community diversity influence variation in plant biomass? There are two competing hypotheses: the biomass ratio' hypothesis, where biomass is influenced by the abundance and traits of the most dominant species, and the diversity' hypothesis, where the diversity of organisms influences biomass through mechanisms such as niche complementarity. However, no studies have tested which one of these two hypotheses better explains the variation in plant biomass in the forest understorey. LocationTemperate deciduous forests in northern France. MethodsFor the forest understorey, we assessed species diversity and biomass as well as soil and light conditions in 133 forest plots of 100m(2) each. Using mixed-effect models and after controlling for potential confounding factors, we tested the biomass ratio' hypothesis by relating the relative abundance of the most dominant species across our study sites and the CWM of plant traits (leaf area and plant height) to biomass. The diversity' hypothesis was tested by relating biomass to various measures of taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic diversity. ResultsBiomass of the forest understorey was mainly related to the relative abundance and the trait values of the most dominant species, supporting the biomass ratio' hypothesis. In contrast to the diversity' hypothesis, functional diversity indices had a negative impact on biomass. We found no contribution of taxonomic or phylogenetic diversity indices. ConclusionThe abundance and traits of the most dominant species matter more than taxonomic, functional or phylogenetic diversity of the forest understorey in explaining its biomass. Thus, there is a need for experiments that aim to fully understand keystone species' responses to on-going changing biotic and abiotic conditions and to predict their effects on ecosystem functioning and processes.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1100-9233 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2397  
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