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Auteur McLean, M.; Auber, A.; Graham, N.A.J.; Houk, P.; Villeger, S.; Violle, C.; Thuiller, W.; Wilson, S.K.; Mouillot, D.
Titre Trait structure and redundancy determine sensitivity to disturbance in marine fish communities Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication (down) Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.
Volume 25 Numéro 10 Pages 3424-3437
Mots-Clés biodiversity; climate change; climate-change; coral reefs; coral-reef fish; diversity stability; ecological traits; ecosystem functioning; ecosystem productivity; egg buoyancy; English Channel; functional diversity; functional redundancy; north-sea; regime shifts; response diversity; vulnerability
Résumé Trait diversity is believed to influence ecosystem dynamics through links between organismal traits and ecosystem processes. Theory predicts that key traits and high trait redundancy-large species richness and abundance supporting the same traits-can buffer communities against environmental disturbances. While experiments and data from simple ecological systems lend support, large-scale evidence from diverse, natural systems under major disturbance is lacking. Here, using long-term data from both temperate (English Channel) and tropical (Seychelles Islands) fishes, we show that sensitivity to disturbance depends on communities' initial trait structure and initial trait redundancy. In both ecosystems, we found that increasing dominance by climatically vulnerable traits (e.g., small, fast-growing pelagics/corallivores) rendered fish communities more sensitive to environmental change, while communities with higher trait redundancy were more resistant. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the influence of trait structure and redundancy on community sensitivity over large temporal and spatial scales in natural systems. Our results exemplify a consistent link between biological structure and community sensitivity that may be transferable across ecosystems and taxa and could help anticipate future disturbance impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000486150200018 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2652
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Auteur McLean, M.; Mouillot, D.; Villeger, S.; Graham, N.A.J.; Auber, A.
Titre Interspecific differences in environmental response blur trait dynamics in classic statistical analyses Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication (down) Revue Abrégée Mar. Biol.
Volume 166 Numéro 12 Pages 152
Mots-Clés climate-change; community composition; ecology; framework; functional diversity; impact; rules
Résumé Trait-based ecology strives to better understand how species, through their bio-ecological traits, respond to environmental changes, and influence ecosystem functioning. Identifying which traits are most responsive to environmental changes can provide insight for understanding community structuring and developing sustainable management practices. However, misinterpretations are possible, because standard statistical methods (e.g., principal component analysis and linear regression) for identifying and ranking the responses of different traits to environmental changes ignore interspecific differences. Here, using both artificial data and real-world examples from marine fish communities, we show how considering species-specific responses can lead to drastically different results than standard community-level methods. By demonstrating the potential impacts of interspecific differences on trait dynamics, we illuminate a major, yet rarely discussed issue, highlighting how analytical misinterpretations can confound our basic understanding of trait responses, which could have important consequences for biodiversity conservation.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0025-3162 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000496131000001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2660
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Auteur Jeanbille, M.; Gury, J.; Duran, R.; Tronczynski, J.; Ghiglione, J.-F.; Agogué, H.; Ben Said, O.; Taib, N.; Debroas, D.; Garnier, C.; Auguet, J.-C.
Titre Chronic Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Contamination Is a Marginal Driver for Community Diversity and Prokaryotic Predicted Functioning in Coastal Sediments Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication (down) Revue Abrégée Front. Microbiol.
Volume 7 Numéro Pages Unsp-1303
Mots-Clés archaeal communities; bacterial communities; benthic biodiversity; chronic contamination; coastal sediment; deep-sea; degrading bacteria; functional diversity; gulf-of-mexico; harbor sediments; horizon oil-spill; microbial communities; pah; polycyclic aromatic-hydrocarbons
Résumé Benthic microorganisms are key players in the recycling of organic matter and recalcitrant compounds such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coastal sediments. Despite their ecological importance, the response of microbial communities to chronic PAH pollution, one of the major threats to coastal ecosystems, has received very little attention. In one of the largest surveys performed so far on coastal sediments, the diversity and composition of microbial communities inhabiting both chronically contaminated and non-contaminated coastal sediments were investigated using high throughput sequencing on the 18S and 16S rRNA genes. Prokaryotic alpha-diversity showed significant association with salinity, temperature, and organic carbon content. The effect of particle size distribution was strong on eukaryotic diversity. Similarly to alpha-diversity, beta diversity patterns were strongly influenced by the environmental filter, while PAHs had no influence on the prokaryotic community structure and a weak impact on the eukaryotic community structure at the continental scale. However, at the regional scale, PAHs became the main driver shaping the structure of bacterial and eukaryotic communities. These patterns were not found for PICRUSt predicted prokaryotic functions, thus indicating some degree of functional redundancy. Eukaryotes presented a greater potential for their use as PAH contamination biomarkers, owing to their stronger response at both regional and continental scales.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1664-302x ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1662
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Auteur Tribot, A.-S.; Deter, J.; Claverie, T.; Guillhaumon, F.; Villeger, S.; Mouquet, N.
Titre Species diversity and composition drive the aesthetic value of coral reef fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication (down) Revue Abrégée Biol. Lett.
Volume 15 Numéro 11 Pages 20190703
Mots-Clés aesthetics; biodiversity; conservation; coral reef fish; ecosystem services; functional diversity; human interest; landscape; nature's contribution to people; quality
Résumé Cultural and recreational values of biodiversity are considered as important dimensions of nature's contribution to people. Among these values, the aesthetics can be of major importance as the appreciation of beauty is one of the simplest forms of human emotional response. Using an online survey, we disentangled the effects of different facets of biodiversity on aesthetic preferences of coral reef fish assemblages that are among the most emblematic assemblages on Earth. While we found a positive saturating effect of species' richness on human preference, we found a net negative effect of species abundance, no effect of species functional diversity and contrasting effects of species composition depending on species' attractiveness. Our results suggest that the biodiversity-human interest relationship is more complex than has been previously stated. By integrating several scales of organization, our study is a step forward in better evaluating the aesthetic value of biodiversity.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000504840300013 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2713
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Auteur Villeger, S.; Grenouillet, G.; Brosse, S.
Titre Functional homogenization exceeds taxonomic homogenization among European fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication (down) Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Biogeography
Volume 23 Numéro 12 Pages 1450-1460
Mots-Clés beta-diversity; exotic species; functional diversity; Non-native species; taxonomic dissimilarity; translocation
Résumé Aim Human activities and the consequent extirpations of native species and introductions of non-native species have been modifying the composition of species assemblages throughout the world. These anthropogenic impacts have modified the richness of assemblages as well as the biological dissimilarity among them. However, while changes in taxonomic dissimilarity (i.e. accounting for species composition) have been assessed intensively during the last decade there are still few assessments of changes in functional dissimilarity (i.e. accounting for the diversity of biological traits). Here, we assess the temporal changes in both taxonomic and functional dissimilarities for freshwater fish assemblages across Europe. Location Western Palaearctic, 137 river basins. Methods The Jaccard index was used to quantify the changes in both taxonomic and functional dissimilarity. We then partitioned dissimilarity to extract its turnover component and measured the changes in the contribution of turnover to dissimilarity. Results Functional homogenization exceeded taxonomic homogenization six-fold. More importantly, we found only a moderate positive correlation between these changes. For instance, 40% of assemblages that experienced taxonomic differentiation were actually functionally homogenized. Taxonomic and functional homogenizations were stronger when the historical level of taxonomic dissimilarity among assemblages was high and when a high number of non-native species were introduced in the assemblages. Moreover, translocated species (i.e. non-native species originating from Europe) played a stronger role than exotic species (i.e. those coming from outside Europe) in this homogenization process, while extirpation did not play a significant role. Main conclusions Change in taxonomic diversity cannot be used to predict changes in functional diversity. In addition, as functional diversity has been proven to be a better indicator of ecosystem functioning and stability than taxonomic diversity, further studies are required to test the potential effects of functional homogenization at the local scale.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1466-8238 ISBN Médium
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Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1178
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