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Auteur Jeanbille, M.; Gury, J.; Duran, R.; Tronczynski, J.; Ghiglione, J.-F.; Agogué, H.; Ben Said, O.; Taib, N.; Debroas, D.; Garnier, C.; Auguet, J.-C.
Titre Chronic Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Contamination Is a Marginal Driver for Community Diversity and Prokaryotic Predicted Functioning in Coastal Sediments Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Microbiol.
Volume 7 Numéro Pages (down) Unsp-1303
Mots-Clés archaeal communities; bacterial communities; benthic biodiversity; chronic contamination; coastal sediment; deep-sea; degrading bacteria; functional diversity; gulf-of-mexico; harbor sediments; horizon oil-spill; microbial communities; pah; polycyclic aromatic-hydrocarbons
Résumé Benthic microorganisms are key players in the recycling of organic matter and recalcitrant compounds such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coastal sediments. Despite their ecological importance, the response of microbial communities to chronic PAH pollution, one of the major threats to coastal ecosystems, has received very little attention. In one of the largest surveys performed so far on coastal sediments, the diversity and composition of microbial communities inhabiting both chronically contaminated and non-contaminated coastal sediments were investigated using high throughput sequencing on the 18S and 16S rRNA genes. Prokaryotic alpha-diversity showed significant association with salinity, temperature, and organic carbon content. The effect of particle size distribution was strong on eukaryotic diversity. Similarly to alpha-diversity, beta diversity patterns were strongly influenced by the environmental filter, while PAHs had no influence on the prokaryotic community structure and a weak impact on the eukaryotic community structure at the continental scale. However, at the regional scale, PAHs became the main driver shaping the structure of bacterial and eukaryotic communities. These patterns were not found for PICRUSt predicted prokaryotic functions, thus indicating some degree of functional redundancy. Eukaryotes presented a greater potential for their use as PAH contamination biomarkers, owing to their stronger response at both regional and continental scales.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1664-302x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1662
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Auteur Barnagaud, J.-Y.; Kissling, W.D.; Tsirogiannis, C.; Fisikopoulos, V.; Villeger, S.; Sekercioglu, C.H.; Svenning, J.-C.
Titre Biogeographical, environmental and anthropogenic determinants of global patterns in bird taxonomic and trait turnover Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.
Volume 26 Numéro 10 Pages (down) 1190-1200
Mots-Clés Anthropocene; Beta diversity; Beta-diversity; biogeographical legacies; biotic homogenization; climate changes; community; components; dispersal; functional diversity; functional diversity; life-history traits; mammal assemblages; net primary production; regional assemblages; specialization; species richness
Résumé AimTo assess contemporary and historical determinants of taxonomic and ecological trait turnover in birds worldwide. We tested whether taxonomic and trait turnover (1) are structured by regional bioclimatic conditions, (2) increase in relationship with topographic heterogeneity and environmental turnover and change according to current and historical environmental conditions, and (3) decrease with human impact. Major TaxaBirds. LocationGlobal. MethodsWe used computationally efficient algorithms to map the taxonomic and trait turnover of 8,040 terrestrial bird assemblages worldwide, based on a grid with 110km x 110 km resolution overlaid on the extent-of-occurrence maps of 7,964 bird species, and nine ecological traits reflecting six key aspects of bird ecology (diet, habitat use, thermal preference, migration, dispersal and body size). We used quantile regression and model selection to quantify the influence of biomes, environment (temperature, precipitation, altitudinal range, net primary productivity, Quaternary temperature and precipitation change) and human impact (human influence index) on bird turnover. ResultsBird taxonomic and trait turnover were highest in the north African deserts and boreal biomes. In the tropics, taxonomic turnover tended to be higher, but trait turnover was lower than in other biomes. Taxonomic and trait turnover exhibited markedly different or even opposing relationships with climatic and topographic gradients, but at their upper quantiles both types of turnover decreased with increasing human influence. Main conclusionsThe influence of regional, environmental and anthropogenic factors differ between bird taxonomic and trait turnover, consistent with an imprint of niche conservatism, environmental filtering and topographic barriers on bird regional assemblages. Human influence on these patterns is pervasive and demonstrates global biotic homogenization at a macroecological scale.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2212
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Auteur Oikonomou, A.; Leprieur, F.; Leonardos, I.D.
Titre Ecomorphological diversity of freshwater fishes as a tool for conservation priority setting: a case study from a Balkan hotspot Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Environ. Biol. Fishes
Volume 101 Numéro 7 Pages (down) 1121-1136
Mots-Clés assemblages; Balkan peninsula; communities; Conservation; Ecomorphology; environmental-factors; Freshwater fishes; functional diversity; future challenges; habitat gradients; life-history strategies; Originality; species richness; stream; traits
Résumé Biodiversity studies commonly focus on taxonomic diversity measures such as species richness and abundance. However, alternative measures based on ecomorphological traits are also critical for unveiling the processes shaping biodiversity and community assembly along environmental gradients. Our study presents the first analysis of habitat-trait-community structure in a Balkan biodiversity hotspot (Louros river, NW Greece), through the investigation of the relationships among freshwater fish assemblages' composition, morphological traits and habitat features. In order to provide a hierarchical classification of species' priority to protection measures, we highlight the most ecomorphologically distinct species using originality analysis. Our results suggest that the longitudinal changes of habitat variables (water temperature, depth, substrate, altitude) drive the local fish assemblages' structure highlighting the upstream-downstream gradient. We also present evidence for environmental filtering, establishing fish assemblages according to their ecomorphological traits. The calculation of the seven available indices of ecomorphological originality indicates that Valencia letourneuxi and Cobitis hellenica, which are endemic to Louros and threatened with extinction, exhibited the highest distinctiveness; thus their protection is of great importance. The methodological approach followed and the patterns described herein can contribute further to the application of community ecology theory to conservation, highlighting the need to use ecomorphological traits as a useful 'tool'.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0378-1909 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2379
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Auteur Parravicini, V.; Villeger, S.; McClanahan, T.R.; Arias-Gonzalez, J.E.; Bellwood, D.R.; Belmaker, J.; Chabanet, P.; Floeter, S.R.; Friedlander, A.M.; Guilhaumon, F.; Vigliola, L.; Kulbicki, M.; Mouillot, D.
Titre Global mismatch between species richness and vulnerability of reef fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology Letters
Volume 17 Numéro 9 Pages (down) 1101-1110
Mots-Clés Vulnerability; biodiversity; biodiversity loss; conservation; coral-reefs; extinction; fisheries; functional diversity; hotspots; macroecology; marine; patterns; protected areas; risk assessment; sensitivity
Résumé The impact of anthropogenic activity on ecosystems has highlighted the need to move beyond the biogeographical delineation of species richness patterns to understanding the vulnerability of species assemblages, including the functional components that are linked to the processes they support. We developed a decision theory framework to quantitatively assess the global taxonomic and functional vulnerability of fish assemblages on tropical reefs using a combination of sensitivity to species loss, exposure to threats and extent of protection. Fish assemblages with high taxonomic and functional sensitivity are often exposed to threats but are largely missed by the global network of marine protected areas. We found that areas of high species richness spatially mismatch areas of high taxonomic and functional vulnerability. Nevertheless, there is strong spatial match between taxonomic and functional vulnerabilities suggesting a potential win-win conservation-ecosystem service strategy if more protection is set in these locations.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 630
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Auteur Colin, N.; Villeger, S.; Wilkes, M.; de Sostoa, A.; Maceda-Veiga, A.
Titre Functional diversity measures revealed impacts of non-native species and habitat degradation on species-poor freshwater fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci. Total Environ.
Volume 625 Numéro Pages (down) 861-871
Mots-Clés biodiversity; ecosystems; community; life-history traits; Non-native species; 4th-corner problem; Functional diversity; Fish assemblages; Biomonitoring; ecological quality; flow regime; Human disturbance; mediterranean rivers; Mediterranean rivers; stream; traits-environment relationships
Résumé Trail-based ecology has been developed for decades lo infer ecosystem responses to stressors based on the functional structure of communities, yet its value in species-poor systems is largely unknown. Here, we used an extensive clataset in a Spanish region highly prone to non-native fish invasions (15 catchments, N 389 sites) to assess for the first time how species-poor communities respond to large-scale environmental gradients using a taxonomic and functional trait-based approach in riverine fish. We examined total species richness and three functional trait-based indices available when many sites have <= 3 species (specialization, FSpe; onginaliy, FOri and entropy, FEnt). We assessed the responses of these taxonomic and functional indices along gradients of altitude, water pollution, physical habitat degradation and non-native fish biomass. Whilst species richness was relatively sensitive to spatial effects, functional diversity indices were responsive across natural and anthropogenic gradients. All four diversity measures declined with altitude but this decline was modulated by physical habitat degradation (richness, FSpe and FEnt) and the non-native total fish biomass ratio (FSpe and FOri) in ways that varied between indices. Furthermore, FSpe and FOri were significantly correlated with Total Nitrogen. Non-native fish were a major component of the taxonomic and functional structure of fish communities, raising concerns about potential misdiagnosis between invaded and environmentally-degraded river reaches. Such misdiagnosis was evident in a regional fish index widely used in official monitoring programs. We recommend the application of FSpe and FOri to extensive clatasets from monitoring programs in order to generate valuable cross-system information about the impacts of non-native species and habitat degradation, even in species-poor systems. Scoring non-native species apart from habitat degradation in the indices used to determine ecosystem health is essential to develop better management strategies. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2309
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