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Auteur Parravicini, V.; Villeger, S.; McClanahan, T.R.; Arias-Gonzalez, J.E.; Bellwood, D.R.; Belmaker, J.; Chabanet, P.; Floeter, S.R.; Friedlander, A.M.; Guilhaumon, F.; Vigliola, L.; Kulbicki, M.; Mouillot, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Global mismatch between species richness and vulnerability of reef fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology Letters  
  Volume 17 Numéro 9 Pages (down) 1101-1110  
  Mots-Clés Vulnerability; biodiversity; biodiversity loss; conservation; coral-reefs; extinction; fisheries; functional diversity; hotspots; macroecology; marine; patterns; protected areas; risk assessment; sensitivity  
  Résumé The impact of anthropogenic activity on ecosystems has highlighted the need to move beyond the biogeographical delineation of species richness patterns to understanding the vulnerability of species assemblages, including the functional components that are linked to the processes they support. We developed a decision theory framework to quantitatively assess the global taxonomic and functional vulnerability of fish assemblages on tropical reefs using a combination of sensitivity to species loss, exposure to threats and extent of protection. Fish assemblages with high taxonomic and functional sensitivity are often exposed to threats but are largely missed by the global network of marine protected areas. We found that areas of high species richness spatially mismatch areas of high taxonomic and functional vulnerability. Nevertheless, there is strong spatial match between taxonomic and functional vulnerabilities suggesting a potential win-win conservation-ecosystem service strategy if more protection is set in these locations.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 630  
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Auteur Colin, N.; Villeger, S.; Wilkes, M.; de Sostoa, A.; Maceda-Veiga, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Functional diversity measures revealed impacts of non-native species and habitat degradation on species-poor freshwater fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci. Total Environ.  
  Volume 625 Numéro Pages (down) 861-871  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; ecosystems; community; life-history traits; Non-native species; 4th-corner problem; Functional diversity; Fish assemblages; Biomonitoring; ecological quality; flow regime; Human disturbance; mediterranean rivers; Mediterranean rivers; stream; traits-environment relationships  
  Résumé Trail-based ecology has been developed for decades lo infer ecosystem responses to stressors based on the functional structure of communities, yet its value in species-poor systems is largely unknown. Here, we used an extensive clataset in a Spanish region highly prone to non-native fish invasions (15 catchments, N 389 sites) to assess for the first time how species-poor communities respond to large-scale environmental gradients using a taxonomic and functional trait-based approach in riverine fish. We examined total species richness and three functional trait-based indices available when many sites have <= 3 species (specialization, FSpe; onginaliy, FOri and entropy, FEnt). We assessed the responses of these taxonomic and functional indices along gradients of altitude, water pollution, physical habitat degradation and non-native fish biomass. Whilst species richness was relatively sensitive to spatial effects, functional diversity indices were responsive across natural and anthropogenic gradients. All four diversity measures declined with altitude but this decline was modulated by physical habitat degradation (richness, FSpe and FEnt) and the non-native total fish biomass ratio (FSpe and FOri) in ways that varied between indices. Furthermore, FSpe and FOri were significantly correlated with Total Nitrogen. Non-native fish were a major component of the taxonomic and functional structure of fish communities, raising concerns about potential misdiagnosis between invaded and environmentally-degraded river reaches. Such misdiagnosis was evident in a regional fish index widely used in official monitoring programs. We recommend the application of FSpe and FOri to extensive clatasets from monitoring programs in order to generate valuable cross-system information about the impacts of non-native species and habitat degradation, even in species-poor systems. Scoring non-native species apart from habitat degradation in the indices used to determine ecosystem health is essential to develop better management strategies. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.  
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  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Médium  
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Auteur Mazel, F.; Guilhaumon, F.; Mouquet, N.; Devictor, V.; Gravel, D.; Renaud, J.; Cianciaruso, M.V.; Loyola, R.; Diniz, J.A.F.; Mouillot, D.; Thuiller, W. url  doi
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  Titre Multifaceted diversity-area relationships reveal global hotspots of mammalian species, trait and lineage diversity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Biogeography  
  Volume 23 Numéro 8 Pages (down) 836-847  
  Mots-Clés Conservation biogeography; Hill's numbers; biodiversity hotspots; congruent; conservation priorities; diversity indices; ecoregions; endemism; evolutionary; functional diversity-area; histories; mammals; phylogenetic diversity; phylogenetic diversity-area; relationship; richness gradients; spatial-patterns; species-area relationship  
  Résumé Aim To define biome-scale hotspots of phylogenetic and functional mammalian biodiversity (PD and FD, respectively) and compare them with 'classical' hotspots based on species richness (SR) alone. Location Global. Methods SR, PD and FD were computed for 782 terrestrial ecoregions using the distribution ranges of 4616 mammalian species. We used a set of comprehensive diversity indices unified by a recent framework incorporating the relative species coverage in each ecoregion. We built large-scale multifaceted diversity-area relationships to rank ecoregions according to their levels of biodiversity while accounting for the effect of area on each facet of diversity. Finally we defined hotspots as the top-ranked ecoregions. Results While ignoring relative species coverage led to a fairly good congruence between biome-scale top ranked SR, PD and FD hotspots, ecoregions harbouring a rich and abundantly represented evolutionary history and FD did not match with the top-ranked ecoregions defined by SR. More importantly PD and FD hotspots showed important spatial mismatches. We also found that FD and PD generally reached their maximum values faster than SR as a function of area. Main conclusions The fact that PD/FD reach their maximum value faster than SR could suggest that the two former facets might be less vulnerable to habitat loss than the latter. While this point is expected, it is the first time that it has been quantified at a global scale and should have important consequences for conservation. Incorporating relative species coverage into the delineation of multifaceted hotspots of diversity led to weak congruence between SR, PD and FD hotspots. This means that maximizing species number may fail to preserve those nodes (in the phylogenetic or functional tree) that are relatively abundant in the ecoregion. As a consequence it may be of prime importance to adopt a multifaceted biodiversity perspective to inform conservation strategies at a global scale.  
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  ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium  
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Auteur Loiseau, N.; Gaertner, J.-C.; Kulbicki, M.; Mérigot, B.; Legras, G.; Taquet, M.; Gaertner-Mazouni, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Assessing the multicomponent aspect of coral fish diversity: The impact of sampling unit dimensions Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecological Indicators  
  Volume 60 Numéro Pages (down) 815-823  
  Mots-Clés Evenness; Functional diversity; Index sensitivity; Sampling unit dimensions; species richness; Visual censuses  
  Résumé The influence of variations in sampling unit dimensions on the assessment of fish species structuring has been widely documented. However, this issue has been restricted to a very limited range of community and population indices (mainly species richness and density). Here, we have investigated this issue through the analysis of 13 diversity indices related to 3 diversity components (number of species, evenness and functional diversity). We analyzed a large set of 257 standardized underwater visual census (UVC) transects dealing with 254 coral fish species. The sensitivity of the indices to the variation in sampling unit dimensions was studied by comparing a range of 55 couples of transect length and width representing 34 sampling surfaces. We found that the extent and profile of the sensitivity to changes in transect dimensions strongly varied both from one index to another and from one dimension to another (length and width). The most sensitive indices were more strongly impacted by variation in length than width. We also showed that for a fixed transect surface, the couple of chosen length and width may alter the assessment of indices related to each of the three main diversity components studied. Some widely used diversity indices, such as species richness and Shannon index, appeared to be very sensitive to changes in transect length and width. In contrast, while still very little used in coral fish studies, two functional diversity indices (FDiv, FEve), and to a lesser extent an evenness index (Berger–Parker), remained robust in the face of change in sampling dimensions. By showing that the variation in sampling dimensions (length, width and surface) may impact diversity indices in a contrasting manner, we stress the need to take into account the sensitivity of the indices to this criterion in the process of selection of the indices to be analyzed in diversity studies. Finally, we found that 30 m long*5 m wide transects might be a suitable compromise size for assessing the patterns of each of the three major complementary components of coral fish diversity.  
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  ISSN 1470-160x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1320  
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Auteur Zupan, L.; Cabeza, M.; Maiorano, L.; Roquet, C.; Devictor, V.; Lavergne, S.; Mouillot, D.; Mouquet, N.; Renaud, J.; Thuiller, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Spatial mismatch of phylogenetic diversity across three vertebrate groups and protected areas in Europe Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Diversity and Distributions  
  Volume 20 Numéro 6 Pages (down) 674-685  
  Mots-Clés Europe; Species diversity; approach; biodiversity; climate-change; communities; ecological; evolutionary diversity; functional diversity; global patterns; hotspots; nature conservation; phylogenetic diversity; protected areas; spatial biodiversity congruence; species richness; terrestrial vertebrates; unified  
  Résumé Aim We investigate patterns of phylogenetic diversity in relation to species diversity for European birds, mammals and amphibians to evaluate their congruence and highlight areas of particular evolutionary history. We estimate the extent to which the European network of protected areas (PAs) network retains interesting evolutionary history areas for the three groups separately and simultaneously. Location Europe Methods Phylogenetic (QE(PD)) and species diversity (SD) were estimated using the Rao's quadratic entropy at 10 ' resolution. We determined the regional relationship between QE(PD) and SD for each taxa with a spatial regression model and used the tails of the residuals (QE(RES)) distribution to identify areas of higher and lower QE(PD) than predicted. Spatial congruence of biodiversity between groups was assessed with Pearson correlation coefficient. A simple classification scheme allowed building a convergence map where a convergent pixel equalled to a QE(RES) value of the same sign for the three groups. This convergence map was overlaid to the current PAs network to estimate the level of protection in convergent pixels and compared it to a null expectation built on 1000 randomization of PAs over the landscape. Results QE(RES) patterns across vertebrates show a strong spatial mismatch highlighting different evolutionary histories. Convergent areas represent only 2.7% of the Western Palearctic, with only 8.4% of these areas being covered by the current PAs network while a random distribution would retain 10.4% of them. QE(RES) are unequally represented within PAs: areas with higher QE(PD) than predicted are better covered than expected, while low QE(PD) areas are undersampled. Main conclusions Patterns of diversity strongly diverge between groups of vertebrates in Europe. Although Europe has the world's most extensive PAs network, evolutionary history of terrestrial vertebrates is unequally protected. The challenge is now to reconcile effective conservation planning with a contemporary view of biodiversity integrating multiple facets.  
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  ISSN 1366-9516 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 856  
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