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Auteur Tribot, A.-S.; Deter, J.; Claverie, T.; Guillhaumon, F.; Villeger, S.; Mouquet, N. doi  openurl
  Titre Species diversity and composition drive the aesthetic value of coral reef fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Lett.  
  Volume 15 Numéro 11 Pages (down) 20190703  
  Mots-Clés aesthetics; biodiversity; conservation; coral reef fish; ecosystem services; functional diversity; human interest; landscape; nature's contribution to people; quality  
  Résumé Cultural and recreational values of biodiversity are considered as important dimensions of nature's contribution to people. Among these values, the aesthetics can be of major importance as the appreciation of beauty is one of the simplest forms of human emotional response. Using an online survey, we disentangled the effects of different facets of biodiversity on aesthetic preferences of coral reef fish assemblages that are among the most emblematic assemblages on Earth. While we found a positive saturating effect of species' richness on human preference, we found a net negative effect of species abundance, no effect of species functional diversity and contrasting effects of species composition depending on species' attractiveness. Our results suggest that the biodiversity-human interest relationship is more complex than has been previously stated. By integrating several scales of organization, our study is a step forward in better evaluating the aesthetic value of biodiversity.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000504840300013 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2713  
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Auteur Seddon, N.; Mace, G.M.; Naeem, S.; Tobias, J.A.; Pigot, A.L.; Cavanagh, R.; Mouillot, D.; Vause, J.; Walpole, M. doi  openurl
  Titre Biodiversity in the Anthropocene: prospects and policy Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.  
  Volume 283 Numéro 1844 Pages (down) 20162094  
  Mots-Clés environment; productivity; functional diversity; ecosystem; conservation; land-use; species richness; extinction; ecosystem services; plant diversity; values; biodiversity services; ecological resilience; interdisciplinary; sustainable development  
  Résumé Meeting the ever-increasing needs of the Earth's human population without excessively reducing biological diversity is one of the greatest challenges facing humanity, suggesting that newapproaches to biodiversity conservation are required. One idea rapidly gaining momentum-as well as opposition-is to incorporate the values of biodiversity into decision-making using economic methods. Here, we develop several lines of argument for how biodiversity might be valued, building on recent developments in natural science, economics and science-policy processes. Then we provide a synoptic guide to the papers in this special feature, summarizing recent research advances relevant to biodiversity valuation and management. Current evidence suggests that more biodiverse systems have greater stability and resilience, and that by maximizing key components of biodiversity we maximize an ecosystem's long-term value. Moreover, many services and values arising from biodiversity are interdependent, and often poorly captured by standard economic models. We conclude that economic valuation approaches to biodiversity conservation should (i) account for interdependency and (ii) complement rather than replace traditional approaches. To identify possible solutions, we present a framework for understanding the foundational role of hard-to-quantify ` biodiversity services' in sustaining the value of ecosystems to humanity, and then use this framework to highlight new directions for pure and applied research. In most cases, clarifying the links between biodiversity and ecosystem services, and developing effective policy and practice for managing biodiversity, will require a genuinely interdisciplinary approach.  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2248  
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Auteur Escalas, A.; Hale, L.; Voordeckers, J.W.; Yang, Y.; Firestone, M.K.; Alvarez-Cohen, L.; Zhou, J. doi  openurl
  Titre Microbial functional diversity: From concepts to applications Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Evol.  
  Volume 9 Numéro 20 Pages (down) 12000-12016  
  Mots-Clés bacterial communities; biodiversity; biogeography; differentiation; functional diversity; functional traits; genes; microbial communities; niche space; redundancy; soil; taxonomy; theoretical frameworks of diversity; trait-based ecology; traits  
  Résumé Functional diversity is increasingly recognized by microbial ecologists as the essential link between biodiversity patterns and ecosystem functioning, determining the trophic relationships and interactions between microorganisms, their participation in biogeochemical cycles, and their responses to environmental changes. Consequently, its definition and quantification have practical and theoretical implications. In this opinion paper, we present a synthesis on the concept of microbial functional diversity from its definition to its application. Initially, we revisit to the original definition of functional diversity, highlighting two fundamental aspects, the ecological unit under study and the functional traits used to characterize it. Then, we discuss how the particularities of the microbial world disallow the direct application of the concepts and tools developed for macroorganisms. Next, we provide a synthesis of the literature on the types of ecological units and functional traits available in microbial functional ecology. We also provide a list of more than 400 traits covering a wide array of environmentally relevant functions. Lastly, we provide examples of the use of functional diversity in microbial systems based on the different units and traits discussed herein. It is our hope that this paper will stimulate discussions and help the growing field of microbial functional ecology to realize a potential that thus far has only been attained in macrobial ecology.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000488395500001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2649  
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Auteur Mouillot, D.; Parravicini, V.; Bellwood, D.R.; Leprieur, F.; Huang, D.; Cowman, P.F.; Albouy, C.; Hughes, T.P.; Thuiller, W.; Guilhaumon, F. doi  openurl
  Titre Global marine protected areas do not secure the evolutionary history of tropical corals and fishes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat. Commun.  
  Volume 7 Numéro Pages (down) 10359  
  Mots-Clés Biodiversity; conservation; extinction risk; functional diversity; management; patterns; phylogenetic diversity; reef fisheries; species richness; vulnerability  
  Résumé Although coral reefs support the largest concentrations of marine biodiversity worldwide, the extent to which the global system of marine-protected areas (MPAs) represents individual species and the breadth of evolutionary history across the Tree of Life has never been quantified. Here we show that only 5.7% of scleractinian coral species and 21.7% of labrid fish species reach the minimum protection target of 10% of their geographic ranges within MPAs. We also estimate that the current global MPA system secures only 1.7% of the Tree of Life for corals, and 17.6% for fishes. Regionally, the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific show the greatest deficit of protection for corals while for fishes this deficit is located primarily in the Western Indian Ocean and in the Central Pacific. Our results call for a global coordinated expansion of current conservation efforts to fully secure the Tree of Life on coral reefs.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1506  
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Auteur McLean, M.; Mouillot, D.; Lindegren, M.; Villeger, S.; Engelhard, G.; Murgier, J.; Auber, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Fish communities diverge in species but converge in traits over three decades of warming Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.  
  Volume 25 Numéro 11 Pages (down) 3972-3984  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; biotic homogenization; climate change; climate-change; community ecology; consequences; ecological traits; ecology; ecosystem functioning; fisheries; functional diversity; north-sea; patterns; plant traits; regime shift; shelf seas; spatio-temporal dynamics  
  Résumé Describing the spatial and temporal dynamics of communities is essential for understanding the impacts of global environmental change on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Trait-based approaches can provide better insight than species-based (i.e. taxonomic) approaches into community assembly and ecosystem functioning, but comparing species and trait dynamics may reveal important patterns for understanding community responses to environmental change. Here, we used a 33-year database of fish monitoring to compare the spatio-temporal dynamics of taxonomic and trait structure in North Sea fish communities. We found that the majority of variation in both taxonomic and trait structure was explained by a pronounced spatial gradient, with distinct communities in the southern and northern North Sea related to depth, sea surface temperature, salinity and bed shear stress. Both taxonomic and trait structure changed significantly over time; however taxonomically, communities in the south and north diverged towards different species, becoming more dissimilar over time, yet they converged towards the same traits regardless of species differences. In particular, communities shifted towards smaller, faster growing species with higher thermal preferences and pelagic water column position. Although taxonomic structure changed over time, its spatial distribution remained relatively stable, whereas in trait structure, the southern zone of the North Sea shifted northward and expanded, leading to homogenization. Our findings suggest that global environmental change, notably climate warming, will lead to convergence towards traits more adapted for novel environments regardless of species composition.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000482780600001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2639  
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