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Auteur Seddon, N.; Mace, G.M.; Naeem, S.; Tobias, J.A.; Pigot, A.L.; Cavanagh, R.; Mouillot, D.; Vause, J.; Walpole, M. doi  openurl
  Titre Biodiversity in the Anthropocene: prospects and policy Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.  
  Volume 283 Numéro 1844 Pages 20162094  
  Mots-Clés environment; productivity; functional diversity; ecosystem; conservation; land-use; species richness; extinction; ecosystem services; plant diversity; values; biodiversity services; ecological resilience; interdisciplinary; sustainable development  
  Résumé Meeting the ever-increasing needs of the Earth's human population without excessively reducing biological diversity is one of the greatest challenges facing humanity, suggesting that newapproaches to biodiversity conservation are required. One idea rapidly gaining momentum-as well as opposition-is to incorporate the values of biodiversity into decision-making using economic methods. Here, we develop several lines of argument for how biodiversity might be valued, building on recent developments in natural science, economics and science-policy processes. Then we provide a synoptic guide to the papers in this special feature, summarizing recent research advances relevant to biodiversity valuation and management. Current evidence suggests that more biodiverse systems have greater stability and resilience, and that by maximizing key components of biodiversity we maximize an ecosystem's long-term value. Moreover, many services and values arising from biodiversity are interdependent, and often poorly captured by standard economic models. We conclude that economic valuation approaches to biodiversity conservation should (i) account for interdependency and (ii) complement rather than replace traditional approaches. To identify possible solutions, we present a framework for understanding the foundational role of hard-to-quantify ` biodiversity services' in sustaining the value of ecosystems to humanity, and then use this framework to highlight new directions for pure and applied research. In most cases, clarifying the links between biodiversity and ecosystem services, and developing effective policy and practice for managing biodiversity, will require a genuinely interdisciplinary approach.  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition (up)  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2248  
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Auteur Carteron, A.; Jeanmougin, M.; Leprieur, F.; Spatharis, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Assessing the efficiency of clustering algorithms and goodness-of-fit measures using phytoplankton field data Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Inform.  
  Volume 9 Numéro Pages 64-68  
  Mots-Clés 2-norm; Beta diversity; Cophenetic correlation coefficient; Dendrogram; Upgma; Ward's algorithm; beta-diversity; blooms; classification; communities; cophenetic correlation; environment; forest; functional diversity; som  
  Résumé Investigation of patterns in beta diversity has received increased attention over the last years particularly in light of new ecological theories such as the metapopulation paradigm and metacommunity theory. Traditionally, beta diversity patterns can be described by cluster analysis (i.e. dendrograms) that enables the classification of samples. Clustering algorithms define the structure of dendrograms, consequently assessing their performance is crucial. A common, although not always appropriate approach for assessing algorithm suitability is the cophenetic correlation coefficient c. Alternatively the 2-norm has been recently proposed as an increasingly informative method for evaluating the distortion engendered by clustering algorithms. In the present work, the 2-norm is applied for the first time on field data and is compared with the cophenetic correlation coefficient using a set of 105 pairwise combinations of 7 clustering methods (e.g. UPGMA) and 15 (dis)similarity/distance indices (e.g. Jaccard index). In contrast to the 2-norm, cophenetic correlation coefficient does not provide a clear indication on the efficiency of the clustering algorithms for all combinations. The two approaches were not always in agreement in the choice of the most faithful algorithm. Additionally, the 2-norm revealed that UPGMA is the most efficient clustering algorithm and Ward's the least. The present results suggest that goodness-of-fit measures such as the 2-norm should be applied prior to clustering analyses for reliable beta diversity measures. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition (up)  
  ISSN 1574-9541 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 457  
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Auteur Mazel, F.; Guilhaumon, F.; Mouquet, N.; Devictor, V.; Gravel, D.; Renaud, J.; Cianciaruso, M.V.; Loyola, R.; Diniz, J.A.F.; Mouillot, D.; Thuiller, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Multifaceted diversity-area relationships reveal global hotspots of mammalian species, trait and lineage diversity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Biogeography  
  Volume 23 Numéro 8 Pages 836-847  
  Mots-Clés Conservation biogeography; Hill's numbers; biodiversity hotspots; congruent; conservation priorities; diversity indices; ecoregions; endemism; evolutionary; functional diversity-area; histories; mammals; phylogenetic diversity; phylogenetic diversity-area; relationship; richness gradients; spatial-patterns; species-area relationship  
  Résumé Aim To define biome-scale hotspots of phylogenetic and functional mammalian biodiversity (PD and FD, respectively) and compare them with 'classical' hotspots based on species richness (SR) alone. Location Global. Methods SR, PD and FD were computed for 782 terrestrial ecoregions using the distribution ranges of 4616 mammalian species. We used a set of comprehensive diversity indices unified by a recent framework incorporating the relative species coverage in each ecoregion. We built large-scale multifaceted diversity-area relationships to rank ecoregions according to their levels of biodiversity while accounting for the effect of area on each facet of diversity. Finally we defined hotspots as the top-ranked ecoregions. Results While ignoring relative species coverage led to a fairly good congruence between biome-scale top ranked SR, PD and FD hotspots, ecoregions harbouring a rich and abundantly represented evolutionary history and FD did not match with the top-ranked ecoregions defined by SR. More importantly PD and FD hotspots showed important spatial mismatches. We also found that FD and PD generally reached their maximum values faster than SR as a function of area. Main conclusions The fact that PD/FD reach their maximum value faster than SR could suggest that the two former facets might be less vulnerable to habitat loss than the latter. While this point is expected, it is the first time that it has been quantified at a global scale and should have important consequences for conservation. Incorporating relative species coverage into the delineation of multifaceted hotspots of diversity led to weak congruence between SR, PD and FD hotspots. This means that maximizing species number may fail to preserve those nodes (in the phylogenetic or functional tree) that are relatively abundant in the ecoregion. As a consequence it may be of prime importance to adopt a multifaceted biodiversity perspective to inform conservation strategies at a global scale.  
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  ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 722  
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Auteur Granger, V.; Fromentin, J.-M.; Bez, N.; Relini, G.; Meynard, C.; GAERTNER, J.-C.; Maiorano, P.; Garcia Ruiz, C.; Follesa, C.; Gristina, M.; Peristeraki, P.; BRIND'AMOUR, A.; Carbonara, P.; Charilaou, C.; Esteban, A.; Jadaud, A.; Joksimovic, A.; Kallianiotis, A.; Kolitari, J.; Manfredi, C.; Massuti, E.; Mifsud, R.; Quetglas, T.; Refes, W.; Sbrana, M.; Vrgoc, N.; SPEDICATO, M.T.; Mérigot, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Large-scale spatio-temporal monitoring highlights hotspots of demersal fish diversity in the Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Progress in Oceanography Revue Abrégée  
  Volume 130 Numéro Pages 65-74  
  Mots-Clés Functional diversity; Phylogenetic diversity; Rao’s quadratic entropy; Regression tree; Large scale  
  Résumé Increasing human pressures and global environmental change may severely affect the diversity of species assemblages and associated ecosystem services. Despite the recent interest in phylogenetic and functional diversity, our knowledge on large spatio-temporal patterns of demersal fish diversity sampled by trawling remains still incomplete, notably in the Mediterranean Sea, one of the most threatened marine regions of the world. We investigated large spatio-temporal diversity patterns by analysing a dataset of 19,886 hauls from 10 to 800 m depth performed annually during the last two decades by standardized scientific bottom trawl field surveys across the Mediterranean Sea, within the MEDITS program. A multi-component (eight diversity indices) and multi-scale (local assemblages, biogeographic regions to basins) approach indicates that only the two most traditional components (species richness and evenness) were sufficient to reflect patterns in taxonomic, phylogenetic or functional richness and divergence. We also put into question the use of widely computed indices that allow comparing directly taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional diversity within a unique mathematical framework. In addition, demersal fish assemblages sampled by trawl do not follow a continuous decreasing longitudinal/latitudinal diversity gradients (spatial effects explained up to 70.6% of deviance in regression tree and generalized linear models), for any of the indices and spatial scales analysed. Indeed, at both local and regional scales species richness was relatively high in the Iberian region, Malta, the Eastern Ionian and Aegean seas, meanwhile the Adriatic Sea and Cyprus showed a relatively low level. In contrast, evenness as well as taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional divergences did not show regional hotspots. All studied diversity components remained stable over the last two decades. Overall, our results highlight the need to use complementary diversity indices through different spatial scales when developing conservation strategies and defining delimitations for protected areas.  
  Adresse Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries, Split, Croatia  
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  Editeur Elsevier BV Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition (up)  
  ISSN 0079-6611 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ 32743 collection 980  
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Auteur Goni-Urriza, M.; Moussard, H.; Lafabrie, H.; Carré, C.; Bouvy, M.; Sakka Hlaili, A.; Pringault, O. doi  openurl
  Titre Consequences of contamination on the interactions between phytoplankton and bacterioplankton Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Chemosphere  
  Volume 195 Numéro Pages 212-222  
  Mots-Clés bizerte lagoon; bacterial communities; polycyclic aromatic-hydrocarbons; surface sediments; functional diversity; ecosystem; sediment resuspension; coastal lagoon; nutrient enrichment; tropical lagoon  
  Résumé Sediment resuspension can provoke strong water enrichment in nutrients, contaminants, and microorganisms. Microcosm incubations were performed in triplicate for 96 h, with lagoon and offshore waters incubated either with sediment elutriate or with an artificial mixture of contaminants issued from sediment resuspension. Sediment elutriate provoked a strong increase in microbial biomass, with little effects on the phytoplankton and bacterioplankton community structures. Among the pool of contaminants released, few were clearly identified as structuring factors of phytoplanktdn and bacterioplankton communities, namely simazine, Cu, Sn, Ni, and Cr. Effects were more pronounced in the offshore waters, suggesting a relative tolerance of the lagoon microbial communities to contamination. The impacts of contamination on the microbial community structure were direct or indirect, depending on the nature and the strength of the interactions between phytoplankton and bacterioplankton. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
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  ISSN 0045-6535 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2265  
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