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Auteur Albouy, C.; Lasram, F.B.R.; Velez, L.; Guilhaumon, F.; Meynard, C.N.; Boyer, S.; Benestan, L.; Mouquet, N.; Douzery, E.; Aznar, R.; Troussellier, M.; Somot, S.; Leprieur, F.; Le Loc'h, F.; Mouillot, D.
Titre FishMed: traits, phylogeny, current and projected species distribution of Mediterranean fishes, and environmental data Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology
Volume 96 Numéro 8 Pages 2312-2313
Mots-Clés climate change; coastal fishes; functional diversity; Mediterranean fish species; Mediterranean Sea; Nemomed8; phylogenetic diversity; species distribution models; taxonomic diversity
Résumé The FishMed database provides traits, phylogeny, current and projected species distribution of Mediterranean fishes, and associated sea surface temperature (SST) from the regional oceanic model NEMOMED8. Data for the current geographical distributions of 635 Mediterranean fish species were compiled from a published expert knowledge atlas of fishes of the northern Atlantic and the Mediterranean (FNAM) edited between 1984 and 1986 and from an updated exotic fish species list. Two future sets of projected species distributions were obtained for the middle and end of the 21st century by using an ensemble forecasting approach for 288 coastal Mediterranean fish species based on SST according to the IPPC/SRES A2 scenario implemented with the Mediterranean climatic model NEMOMED8. The functional part of the database encompasses 12 biological and ecological traits (maximal and common lengths, vertical distribution, habitat, migration type, mode of reproduction, sex shift, semelparity, diet type (larvae and adults), social behavior, species origin, and depth) for the 635 fish species. To build the phylogeny we inferred the timing and geographic origins of Mediterranean teleost species diversity using nucleotide sequences collected from GenBank including 62% of Mediterranean teleost species plus nine outgroups. Maximum likelihood Bayesian phylogenetic and dating analyses were calibrated using 20 fossil species. An additional 124 fish species were grafted onto the chronogram according to their taxonomic affinity to obtain a phylogenetic tree including 498 species. Finally we also present the associated SST data for the observed period (1961–1980) and for the middle (2040–2059) and the end of the 21st century (2080–2099) obtained from NEMOMED8 according to the IPCC A2 scenario. The FishMed database might be of interest in the context of global anthropogenic changes as coastal Mediterranean ecosystems are currently recognized as one of the most impacted ecosystems on earth.
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ISSN 1939-9170 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel (up) MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1471
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Auteur Seddon, N.; Mace, G.M.; Naeem, S.; Tobias, J.A.; Pigot, A.L.; Cavanagh, R.; Mouillot, D.; Vause, J.; Walpole, M.
Titre Biodiversity in the Anthropocene: prospects and policy Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.
Volume 283 Numéro 1844 Pages 20162094
Mots-Clés environment; productivity; functional diversity; ecosystem; conservation; land-use; species richness; extinction; ecosystem services; plant diversity; values; biodiversity services; ecological resilience; interdisciplinary; sustainable development
Résumé Meeting the ever-increasing needs of the Earth's human population without excessively reducing biological diversity is one of the greatest challenges facing humanity, suggesting that newapproaches to biodiversity conservation are required. One idea rapidly gaining momentum-as well as opposition-is to incorporate the values of biodiversity into decision-making using economic methods. Here, we develop several lines of argument for how biodiversity might be valued, building on recent developments in natural science, economics and science-policy processes. Then we provide a synoptic guide to the papers in this special feature, summarizing recent research advances relevant to biodiversity valuation and management. Current evidence suggests that more biodiverse systems have greater stability and resilience, and that by maximizing key components of biodiversity we maximize an ecosystem's long-term value. Moreover, many services and values arising from biodiversity are interdependent, and often poorly captured by standard economic models. We conclude that economic valuation approaches to biodiversity conservation should (i) account for interdependency and (ii) complement rather than replace traditional approaches. To identify possible solutions, we present a framework for understanding the foundational role of hard-to-quantify ` biodiversity services' in sustaining the value of ecosystems to humanity, and then use this framework to highlight new directions for pure and applied research. In most cases, clarifying the links between biodiversity and ecosystem services, and developing effective policy and practice for managing biodiversity, will require a genuinely interdisciplinary approach.
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ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel (up) MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2248
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Auteur Goni-Urriza, M.; Moussard, H.; Lafabrie, H.; Carré, C.; Bouvy, M.; Sakka Hlaili, A.; Pringault, O.
Titre Consequences of contamination on the interactions between phytoplankton and bacterioplankton Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Chemosphere
Volume 195 Numéro Pages 212-222
Mots-Clés bizerte lagoon; bacterial communities; polycyclic aromatic-hydrocarbons; surface sediments; functional diversity; ecosystem; sediment resuspension; coastal lagoon; nutrient enrichment; tropical lagoon
Résumé Sediment resuspension can provoke strong water enrichment in nutrients, contaminants, and microorganisms. Microcosm incubations were performed in triplicate for 96 h, with lagoon and offshore waters incubated either with sediment elutriate or with an artificial mixture of contaminants issued from sediment resuspension. Sediment elutriate provoked a strong increase in microbial biomass, with little effects on the phytoplankton and bacterioplankton community structures. Among the pool of contaminants released, few were clearly identified as structuring factors of phytoplanktdn and bacterioplankton communities, namely simazine, Cu, Sn, Ni, and Cr. Effects were more pronounced in the offshore waters, suggesting a relative tolerance of the lagoon microbial communities to contamination. The impacts of contamination on the microbial community structure were direct or indirect, depending on the nature and the strength of the interactions between phytoplankton and bacterioplankton. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0045-6535 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel (up) MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2265
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Auteur Mouton, T.L.; Matheson, F.E.; Stephenson, F.; Champion, P.D.; Wadhwa, S.; Hamer, M.P.; Catlin, A.; Riis, T.
Titre Environmental filtering of native and non-native stream macrophyte assemblages by habitat disturbances in an agricultural landscape Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci. Total Environ.
Volume 659 Numéro Pages 1370-1381
Mots-Clés Agricultural impacts; classification; ecological impacts; eutrophication; Functional diversity; functional diversity measures; Functional traits; land-use; management; metaanalysis; Non-native flora; restoration; RLQ and fourth-corner analyses; species traits; trait responses
Résumé Understanding how inter-specific variation in functional traits affects native and non-native species responses to stream disturbances, is necessary to inform management strategies, providing tools for biomonitoring, conservation and restoration. This study used a functional trait approach to characterise the responses of macrophyte assemblages to reach-scale disturbances (measured by lack of riparian shading, altered hydromorphology and eutrophication), from 97 wadeable stream sites in an agriculturally impacted region of New Zealand. To determine whether macrophyte assemblages differed due to disturbances, we examined multidimensional assemblage functional structure in relation to eleven functional traits and further related two functional diversity indices (entropy and originality) to disturbances. Macrophyte assemblages showed distinct patterns in response to disturbances, with riparian shading and hydromorphological conditions being the strongest variables shaping macrophyte functional structure. In the multidimensional space, most of the non-native species were associatedwith disturbed conditions. These species had traits allowing faster colonisation rates (higher number of reproductive organs and larger root-rhizome system) and superior competitive abilities for resources (tall and dense canopy, heterophylly and greater preferences for light and nitrogen). In addition, lack of riparian shading increased the abundance of functionally distinct species (i.e. entropy), and eutrophication resulted in the growth of functionally unique species (i.e. originality). We demonstrated that stream reach-scale habitat disturbances were associated to a dominance of more productive species, equating to a greater abundance of non-native species. This, can result in a displacement of native species, habitat alterations, and changes to higher trophic level assemblages. Our results suggests that reachscale management efforts such as the conservation and restoration of riparian vegetation that provides substantial shading and hydromorphologically diverse in-stream habitat, would have beneficial direct and indirect effects on ecosystem functioning, and contribute to the mitigation of land-use impacts. (C) 2018 Published by Elsevier B.V.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel (up) MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2571
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Auteur Benedetti, F.; Ayata, S.-D.; Irisson, J.-O.; Adloff, F.; Guilhaumon, F.
Titre Climate change may have minor impact on zooplankton functional diversity in the Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Divers. Distrib.
Volume 25 Numéro 4 Pages 568-581
Mots-Clés biogeography; calanus-helgolandicus; climate change; communities; conservation; fish assemblages; framework; functional diversity; future; marine biodiversity; Mediterranean Sea; niche modelling; null model; ocean; trait; zooplankton
Résumé Aim To assess the impact of climate change on the functional diversity of marine zooplankton communities. Location The Mediterranean Sea. Methods We used the functional traits and geographic distributions of 106 copepod species to estimate the zooplankton functional diversity of Mediterranean surface assemblages for the 1965-1994 and 2069-2098 periods. Multiple environmental niche models were trained at the global scale to project the species habitat suitability in the Mediterranean Sea and assess their sensitivity to climate change predicted by several scenarios. Simultaneously, the species traits were used to compute a functional dendrogram from which we identified seven functional groups and estimated functional diversity through Faith's index. We compared the measured functional diversity to the one originated from null models to test if changes in functional diversity were solely driven by changes in species richness. Results All but three of the 106 species presented range contractions of varying intensity. A relatively low decrease of species richness (-7.42 on average) is predicted for 97% of the basin, with higher losses in the eastern regions. Relative sensitivity to climate change is not clustered in functional space and does not significantly vary across the seven copepod functional groups defined. Changes in functional diversity follow the same pattern and are not different from those that can be expected from changes in richness alone. Main conclusions Climate change is not expected to alter copepod functional traits distribution in the Mediterranean Sea, as the most and the least sensitive species are functionally redundant. Such redundancy should buffer the loss of ecosystem functions in Mediterranean zooplankton assemblages induced by climate change. Because the most negatively impacted species are affiliated to temperate regimes and share Atlantic biogeographic origins, our results are in line with the hypothesis of increasingly more tropical Mediterranean communities.
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ISSN 1366-9516 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel (up) MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2582
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