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Auteur Villeger, S.; Grenouillet, G.; Brosse, S. url  doi
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  Titre Decomposing functional β-diversity reveals that low functional β-diversity is driven by low functional turnover in European fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Global Ecology and Biogeography  
  Volume 22 Numéro 6 Pages 671-681  
  Mots-Clés Europe; Functional richness; beta-diversity; convex hull volume; freshwater fish; functional diversity; functional traits; overlap  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-8238 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 507  
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Auteur Loiseau, N.; Legras, G.; Kulbicki, M.; Mérigot, B.; Harmelin-Vivien, M.; Mazouni, N.; Galzin, R.; Gaertner, J.C. doi  openurl
  Titre Multi-component β-diversity approach reveals conservation dilemma between species and functions of coral reef fishes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) J. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 44 Numéro 3 Pages 537-547  
  Mots-Clés assemblages; Beta diversity; Beta-diversity; biodiversity; climate; coral reef fish; environmental dissimilarity; functional diversity; global patterns; models; nestedness; null; partitioning; turnover; vulnerability  
  Résumé AimWe applied a multicomponent approach based on the decomposition of taxonomic (both presence-absence and abundance) and functional beta diversity to determine the influence of ecological factors in shaping spatial distribution diversity of coral reef fishes, and the implications for conservation decisions. LocationLagoons of ten atolls characterized by low human pressure but with contrasted geomorphology in the Tuamotu Archipelago, French Polynesia. MethodsWe computed beta diversities and their partitioning components, both at local (inter-transect, from 200m to 10km) and large (among atolls, from 22 to 350km) spatial scales. Null models were applied to test whether the observed beta diversity differed from random expectation. Multiple generalized dissimilarity models were run to test which environmental factors were the best predictors of observed beta diversities. ResultsBeta diversity was indistinguishable from randomness at both spatial scales. Species remained generally interchangeable among transects within an atoll and to some extent among atolls. However, strong deviance explained by models showed that the number of species, the number of individuals and functional traits present in transects and atolls were determined by deterministic factors (i.e. environmental factors). Modelling each beta diversity component separately also revealed partial mismatch among atolls and among species and functional dissimilarities. The influence of environmental variables strongly varied among atolls, species and functional dissimilarities. Main conclusionsBy revealing the spatial scaling of ecological factors and partial congruence among species and functional diversity, assessment of beta diversity provides insight into conservation planning. Our results support the idea that conservation planning applied to protect taxonomic diversity cannot be fully extended to functional diversity. We have addressed the dilemma of which diversity component should be favoured in conservation strategies.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2117  
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Auteur Wasof, S.; Lenoir, J.; Hattab, T.; Jamoneau, A.; Gallet-Moron, E.; Ampoorter, E.; Saguez, R.; Bennsadek, L.; Bertrand, R.; Valdes, A.; Verheyen, K.; Decocq, G. doi  openurl
  Titre Dominance of individual plant species is more important than diversity in explaining plant biomass in the forest understorey Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) J. Veg. Sci.  
  Volume 29 Numéro 3 Pages 521-531  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; biomass; biomass ratio hypothesis; community biomass; current knowledge; deciduous forests; ecosystem productivity; forest understorey; functional diversity; ivy; multiple traits; niche conservatism; phylogenetic diversity; phylogeny; production; richness  
  Résumé QuestionsHow does plant community diversity influence variation in plant biomass? There are two competing hypotheses: the biomass ratio' hypothesis, where biomass is influenced by the abundance and traits of the most dominant species, and the diversity' hypothesis, where the diversity of organisms influences biomass through mechanisms such as niche complementarity. However, no studies have tested which one of these two hypotheses better explains the variation in plant biomass in the forest understorey. LocationTemperate deciduous forests in northern France. MethodsFor the forest understorey, we assessed species diversity and biomass as well as soil and light conditions in 133 forest plots of 100m(2) each. Using mixed-effect models and after controlling for potential confounding factors, we tested the biomass ratio' hypothesis by relating the relative abundance of the most dominant species across our study sites and the CWM of plant traits (leaf area and plant height) to biomass. The diversity' hypothesis was tested by relating biomass to various measures of taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic diversity. ResultsBiomass of the forest understorey was mainly related to the relative abundance and the trait values of the most dominant species, supporting the biomass ratio' hypothesis. In contrast to the diversity' hypothesis, functional diversity indices had a negative impact on biomass. We found no contribution of taxonomic or phylogenetic diversity indices. ConclusionThe abundance and traits of the most dominant species matter more than taxonomic, functional or phylogenetic diversity of the forest understorey in explaining its biomass. Thus, there is a need for experiments that aim to fully understand keystone species' responses to on-going changing biotic and abiotic conditions and to predict their effects on ecosystem functioning and processes.  
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  ISSN 1100-9233 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2397  
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Auteur McLean, M.; Mouillot, D.; Villeger, S.; Graham, N.A.J.; Auber, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Interspecific differences in environmental response blur trait dynamics in classic statistical analyses Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Mar. Biol.  
  Volume 166 Numéro 12 Pages 152  
  Mots-Clés climate-change; community composition; ecology; framework; functional diversity; impact; rules  
  Résumé Trait-based ecology strives to better understand how species, through their bio-ecological traits, respond to environmental changes, and influence ecosystem functioning. Identifying which traits are most responsive to environmental changes can provide insight for understanding community structuring and developing sustainable management practices. However, misinterpretations are possible, because standard statistical methods (e.g., principal component analysis and linear regression) for identifying and ranking the responses of different traits to environmental changes ignore interspecific differences. Here, using both artificial data and real-world examples from marine fish communities, we show how considering species-specific responses can lead to drastically different results than standard community-level methods. By demonstrating the potential impacts of interspecific differences on trait dynamics, we illuminate a major, yet rarely discussed issue, highlighting how analytical misinterpretations can confound our basic understanding of trait responses, which could have important consequences for biodiversity conservation.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  ISSN 0025-3162 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000496131000001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2660  
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Auteur Mouillot, D.; Parravicini, V.; Bellwood, D.R.; Leprieur, F.; Huang, D.; Cowman, P.F.; Albouy, C.; Hughes, T.P.; Thuiller, W.; Guilhaumon, F. doi  openurl
  Titre Global marine protected areas do not secure the evolutionary history of tropical corals and fishes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Nat. Commun.  
  Volume 7 Numéro Pages 10359  
  Mots-Clés Biodiversity; conservation; extinction risk; functional diversity; management; patterns; phylogenetic diversity; reef fisheries; species richness; vulnerability  
  Résumé Although coral reefs support the largest concentrations of marine biodiversity worldwide, the extent to which the global system of marine-protected areas (MPAs) represents individual species and the breadth of evolutionary history across the Tree of Life has never been quantified. Here we show that only 5.7% of scleractinian coral species and 21.7% of labrid fish species reach the minimum protection target of 10% of their geographic ranges within MPAs. We also estimate that the current global MPA system secures only 1.7% of the Tree of Life for corals, and 17.6% for fishes. Regionally, the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific show the greatest deficit of protection for corals while for fishes this deficit is located primarily in the Western Indian Ocean and in the Central Pacific. Our results call for a global coordinated expansion of current conservation efforts to fully secure the Tree of Life on coral reefs.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1506  
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