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Auteur (up) Dias, M.S.; Oberdorff, T.; Hugueny, B.; Leprieur, F.; Jezequel, C.; Cornu, J.F.; Brosse, S.; Grenouillet, G.; Tedesco, P.A.
Titre Global imprint of historical connectivity on freshwater fish biodiversity Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology Letters
Volume 17 Numéro 9 Pages 1130-1140
Mots-Clés Alpha diversity; Beta diversity; Biogeography; Quaternary climate changes; africa; climate changes; contemporary; diversity patterns; endemism; evolution; freshwater fish; global; history; north-america; richness; river systems; scale; sea-level changes; species turnover; species-richness
Résumé The relative importance of contemporary and historical processes is central for understanding biodiversity patterns. While several studies show that past conditions can partly explain the current biodiversity patterns, the role of history remains elusive. We reconstructed palaeo-drainage basins under lower sea level conditions (Last Glacial Maximum) to test whether the historical connectivity between basins left an imprint on the global patterns of freshwater fish biodiversity. After controlling for contemporary and past environmental conditions, we found that palaeo-connected basins displayed greater species richness but lower levels of endemism and beta diversity than did palaeo-disconnected basins. Palaeo-connected basins exhibited shallower distance decay of compositional similarity, suggesting that palaeo-river connections favoured the exchange of fish species. Finally, we found that a longer period of palaeo-connection resulted in lower levels of beta diversity. These findings reveal the first unambiguous results of the role played by history in explaining the global contemporary patterns of biodiversity.
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ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 631
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Auteur (up) Duponchelle, F.; Pouilly, M.; Pecheyran, C.; Hauser, M.; Renno, J.-F.; Panfili, J.; Darnaude, A.M.; Garcia-Vasquez, A.; Carvajal-Vallejos, F.; Garcia-Davila, C.; Doria, C.; Berail, S.; Donard, A.; Sondag, F.; Santos, R.V.; Nunez, J.; Point, D.; Labonne, M.; Baras, E.
Titre Trans-Amazonian natal homing in giant catfish Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Appl. Ecol.
Volume 53 Numéro 5 Pages 1511-1520
Mots-Clés Amazon; anthropogenic activities; brachyplatystoma-rousseauxii; Brachyplatystoma spp.; fisheries; fish otoliths; freshwater fish; giant catfish; hydroelectric dams; hydropower; isotopic signatures; markers; mass spectrometry; migration; migratory catfish; otoliths; pimelodidae; river; Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios
Résumé 1. Knowledge of fish migration is a prerequisite to sustainable fisheries management and preservation, especially in large international river basins. In particular, understanding whether a migratory lifestyle is compulsory or facultative, and whether adults home to their natal geographic area is paramount to fully appraise disruptions of longitudinal connectivity resulting from damming. 2. In the Amazon, the large migratory catfishes of the Brachyplatystoma genus are apex predators of considerable interest for fisheries. They are believed to use the entire length of the basin to perform their life cycle, with hypothesized homing behaviours. Here, we tested these hypotheses, using the emblematic B. rousseauxii as a model species. 3. We sampled adults close to major breeding areas in the Amazon basin (upper Madeira and upper Amazonas) and assessed their lifetime movements by measuring variations in Sr-87/Sr-86 along transverse sections of their otoliths (ear stones) using laser ablation multicollector mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICPMS). 4. We demonstrate that larvae migrate downstream from the Andean piedmont to the lower Amazon, where they grow over a protracted period before migrating upstream as adults. Contrary to prevailing inferences, not all fish spend their nursery stages in the Amazon estuary,. By contrast, the passage in the lower or central Amazon seems an obligate part of the life cycle. We further evidence that most adults home to their natal geographic area within the Madeira sub-basin. Such long-distance natal homing is exceptional in purely freshwater fishes. 5. Synthesis and applications. By using otolith microchemistry, we were able to demonstrate a seemingly compulsory basin-wide migratory life cycle of large Amazonian catfishes. This makes them the organisms performing the longest migrations ( >8000 km) in fresh waters. This exceptional life history is already jeopardized by two dams recently built in the Madeira River, which block a major migration route and access to a substantial part of their spawning grounds. Major impacts can be anticipated from the current and forthcoming hydroelectric development in the Amazon basin, not only on the populations and fisheries of this apex predator, but also on Amazonian food webs through trophic cascades.
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ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1693
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Auteur (up) Leprieur, F.; Oikonomou, A.
Titre The need for richness-independent measures of turnover when delineating biogeographical regions Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Biogeography
Volume 41 Numéro 2 Pages 417-420
Mots-Clés Beta diversity; bioregionalization; clustering; compositional dissimilarity; freshwater fishes; species richness; species turnover; β-3 index; βsim index
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ISSN 1365-2699 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 896
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Auteur (up) Leroy, B.; Dias, M.S.; Giraud, E.; Hugueny, B.; Jezequel, C.; Leprieur, F.; Oberdorff, T.; Tedesco, P.A.
Titre Global biogeographical regions of freshwater fish species Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés actinopterygians; biogeographical regions; biogeography; bioregionalization; bioregions; connectivity; dispersal; diversity; evolution; freshwater fish; history; homogenization; network; patterns; richness; transition zones; vicariance; world; zoogeographical regions
Résumé Aim To define the major biogeographical regions and transition zones for freshwater fish species. Taxon Strictly freshwater species of actinopterygian fish (i.e. excluding marine and amphidromous fish families). Methods We based our bioregionalization on a global database of freshwater fish species occurrences in drainage basins, which, after filtering, includes 11,295 species in 2,581 basins. On the basis of this dataset, we generated a bipartite (basin-species) network upon which we applied a hierarchical clustering algorithm (the Map Equation) to detect regions. We tested the robustness of regions with a sensitivity analysis. We identified transition zones between major regions with the participation coefficient, indicating the degree to which a basin has species from multiple regions. Results Our bioregionalization scheme showed two major supercontinental regions (Old World and New World, 50% species of the world and 99.96% endemics each). Nested within these two supercontinental regions lie six major regions (Nearctic, Neotropical, Palearctic, Ethiopian, Sino-Oriental and Australian) with extremely high degrees of endemism (above 96% except for the Palearctic). Transition zones between regions were of limited extent compared to other groups of organisms. We identified numerous subregions with high diversity and endemism in tropical areas (e.g. Neotropical), and a few large subregions with low diversity and endemism at high latitudes (e.g. Palearctic). Main conclusions Our results suggest that regions of freshwater fish species were shaped by events of vicariance and geodispersal which were similar to other groups, but with freshwater-specific processes of isolation that led to extremely high degrees of endemism (far exceeding endemism rates of other continental vertebrates), specific boundary locations and limited extents of transition zones. The identified bioregions and transition zones of freshwater fish species reflect the strong isolation of freshwater fish faunas for the past 10-20 million years. The extremely high endemism and diversity of freshwater fish fauna raises many questions about the biogeographical consequences of current introductions and extinctions.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2637
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Auteur (up) Oikonomou, A.; Leprieur, F.; Leonardos, I.D.
Titre Ecomorphological diversity of freshwater fishes as a tool for conservation priority setting: a case study from a Balkan hotspot Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Environ. Biol. Fishes
Volume 101 Numéro 7 Pages 1121-1136
Mots-Clés assemblages; Balkan peninsula; communities; Conservation; Ecomorphology; environmental-factors; Freshwater fishes; functional diversity; future challenges; habitat gradients; life-history strategies; Originality; species richness; stream; traits
Résumé Biodiversity studies commonly focus on taxonomic diversity measures such as species richness and abundance. However, alternative measures based on ecomorphological traits are also critical for unveiling the processes shaping biodiversity and community assembly along environmental gradients. Our study presents the first analysis of habitat-trait-community structure in a Balkan biodiversity hotspot (Louros river, NW Greece), through the investigation of the relationships among freshwater fish assemblages' composition, morphological traits and habitat features. In order to provide a hierarchical classification of species' priority to protection measures, we highlight the most ecomorphologically distinct species using originality analysis. Our results suggest that the longitudinal changes of habitat variables (water temperature, depth, substrate, altitude) drive the local fish assemblages' structure highlighting the upstream-downstream gradient. We also present evidence for environmental filtering, establishing fish assemblages according to their ecomorphological traits. The calculation of the seven available indices of ecomorphological originality indicates that Valencia letourneuxi and Cobitis hellenica, which are endemic to Louros and threatened with extinction, exhibited the highest distinctiveness; thus their protection is of great importance. The methodological approach followed and the patterns described herein can contribute further to the application of community ecology theory to conservation, highlighting the need to use ecomorphological traits as a useful 'tool'.
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ISSN 0378-1909 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2379
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